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MACDONALDO 





















































geneal aoy collection 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


BY THE SAME WRITER 


A ROMANTIC CHAPTER IN FAMILY HISTORY 
Privately printed in 1911 (Hatchard) 

THE HOUSE OF THE ISLES 

Privately printed in 1925 (Constable) 







THE GALLERY AT THORPE 




















THE 

FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

(BOSVILLE OF NEW HALL 
GUNTHWAITE AND THORPE) 

THROUGH 

NINE CENTURIES 

BY 

A'fc./M. •• 

LADY MACDONALD OF THE ISLES 


PRIVATELY PRINTED BY 
T. AND A. CONSTABLE LTD. 
EDINBURGH 






o 





Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2018 



https://archive.org/details/fortunesoffamilyOOmacd 



TO 

CELIA 

WHO MADE ME DO IT 
FROM 


HER MOTHER 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


• • • 
vm 

be to destroy the atmosphere of their old world 
charm, and I have tried to let all speak as much 
as possible for themselves. 

It has been truly a labour of love, and it is 
with regret that I lay down my pen. 

ALICE BOSVILLE MACDONALD OF THE ISLES. 

Thorpe Hall, 

November 1927. 


Since this book was ready to print I have learnt 
that a copy of Godfrey Bosville’s Memoirs exists in 
the Wilson Collection at Sheffield, besides other old 
papers belonging to the family. Hunter must have 
consulted all these for his South Yorkshire, so I hope 
I have missed nothing of any great importance by my 
previous ignorance of the existence of these papers, 
the knowledge of which comes too late to use. 

A. E. B. M. 


CONTENTS 


CHAP. PAGE 

I. The Founder of the Family—Eleventh 

Century ...... 1 

II. The First Yorkshire Bosvilles—Twelfth 

Century ...... 7 

III. Settling Down—Thirteenth Century . 12 

IV. Laying Acre to Acre — Fourteenth 

Century ...... 17 

V. Fifteenth - Century Heiresses — Fif¬ 
teenth Century .... 31 

VI. In Tudor Days—Sixteenth Century . 38 

VII. In the Time of the Commonwealth— 

Seventeenth Century . . .61 

VIII. Through Restoration to Revolution— 

Seventeenth Century ... 80 

IX. Eighteenth - Century Bosvilles — Eigh¬ 
teenth Century .... 97 

X. Fashion and Genius — Eighteenth Cen¬ 
tury ....... 180 


IX 


X 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


CRAP. PAGE 

XI. The Last of the Bosvilles—Into the 

Nineteenth Century . . .186 

XII. Other Bosyille Branches . . . 203 

XIII. Notes on the Family Coat . . .211 

XIV. A Contrast in Bosvilles . . . 213 

XV. A Bundle of Old Papers . . . 220 

APPENDICES 

I. Pedigrees ...... 226 

II. 4 A Rentall of Captain Bosville’s Estate, 

1722 ’.241 

250 


III. ‘ Lady Macdonald’s Wedding Cloaths 1768 ’ 

IV. Notes on the Hassell Family 


253 


ILLUSTRATIONS 


THE GALLERY AT THORPE. Frontispiece 

From the picture by Frederick W. Elwell, R.O.I., by his kind 
permission. (The figures in the picture are portraits of 
Sir Alexander Macdonald of the Isles and his family.) 

PAGE 

ALL THAT IS LEFT OF GUNTHWAITE HALL ... 33 

INTERIOR OF PART OF OLD BARN, GUNTH WAITE . . 33 

BODIAM CASTLE, SUSSEX.48 

From Buck's Views. 

COLONEL GODFREY BOSVILLE OF GUNTH WAITE, M.P. . 81 

From the picture at Thorpe. 

GODFREY BOSVILLE AND DIANA WENTWORTH WITH 

HER FAMILY AT BRETTON.96 

From the picture by Philippe Mercier at Thorpe. 

SIR THOMAS WENTWORTH (later BLACKETT) WITH HIS 

NEPHEW, BILLY BOSVILLE.129 

From the picture at Thorpe. 

ANNABELLA WENTWORTH.129 

From the picture by Sir Joshua Reynolds at Thorpe. 

JULIA BOSVILLE, VISCOUNTESS DUDLEY AND WARD . 144 

From the picture by Sir Joshua Reynolds at Thorpe. 

WILLIAM BOSVILLE WITH HIS NEPHEW, CAPTAIN THE 
HON. ARCHIBALD MACDONALD, AND HIS GRAND¬ 
NEPHEW, SIR GEORGE SINCLAIR.193 

From the picture by Hoppner at Bretton , by kind permission of 
Viscount Allendale. 

THORPE HALL IN THE EAST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE . 208 

From the picture by Frederick W. Elwell , R.O.I., at Thorpe. 


XI 







THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


CHAPTER I 

THE FOUNDER OF THE FAMILY- 
ELEVENTH CENTURY 

Not quite ten miles due south of Saint-Valery- 
en-Caux in Normandy is the little village of 
Bosville (in these days a junction on the Rouen 
railway),which is still famous for its market and 
fair and is still surrounded by the fertile pres 
sales , those good sea-mist swept meadows so 
excellent for cattle. Indeed, the oxen of this 
district were so famous that the very name of the 
village tells you so, Bos being Latin for bull and 
villa for a country dwelling. This latter syllable 
has been turned into the French ville= a town. 

From this spot came, in the eleventh cen¬ 
tury, the progenitor of the Bosville family— 
Sir Martin de Bosville, Knight. (I .) 1 

No doubt he had his castle here, where the 
later chateau now stands, close to the little 
church dedicated to St. Samson. 

For Bosville and its lord, the meeting in 

1 The Roman numbers refer to the heads of the family. 

A 


2 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


1065, at Lillebonne Castle, whither Duke 
William of Normandy summoned his vassals 
to consult with them as to his projected inva¬ 
sion of England, must have been thrilling. 
Most of Duke William’s people were not at all 
anxious to make the attempt, and considered 
that they should not be asked to fight beyond 
the sea. Whether Sir Martin agreed with them 
or not, the meeting was big with fate for many 
a Norman. For Duke William prevailed in the 
council and presently led his barons to victory 
over Saxon Harold at Hastings (in 1066), 
and England became a mine of rich gifts for 
them all. 

There is a paper at Thorpe written long 
afterwards by a descendant of the Norman 
knight—the fourth Godfrey Bosville—who com¬ 
posed Memoirs of the Bosvilles , a book which, 
alas ! appears to have vanished, but to which 
reference is made by the historian Hunter in a 
note upon page 283 of his History of Hallamshire. 
The paper at Thorpe is probably part of the 
first rough copy of these Memoirs and is a mere 
fragment, but even so it is a valuable source 
of information as to the founding and growing 
of the family. Its very existence, even in its 
mutilated state, is rather a marvel, as its pages 




THE FOUNDER OF THE FAMILY 


3 


were all thrown about among old papers and 
letters in a box and were little thought of; 
indeed one finds upon them in several places 
the inscription, 4 Of no Use.’ 

Godfrey Bosville writes in a most discursive 
strain, often deserting family records to solilo¬ 
quise over matters such as the wickedness of 
monopolies, the origin of the names of village 
inns, etc. etc.; still, much of interest about 
his family can be gleaned from the few pages 
left. The date of these scattered leaves is fixed 
by the fact that one of them, used on one side 
for the Memoirs, is on the other side a letter 
not addressed to Godfrey Bosville but to 
Mr. Watson, his brother-in-law. This letter is 
chiefly a receipt for a bill of £120, and is dated 
20th July 1758. But Godfrey Bosville evi¬ 
dently did not hurry over his writing, as 
Hunter, in the second volume of his South 
Yorkshire, in a note on page 349, gives a copy 
of the following declaration :— 

4 1, Godfrey Bosville of Gunthwaite, in the 
year 1765, finished this account of the family 
according to the writings and have likewise 
wrote the Catalogue of the writings to which 
it refers, because in my younger days, I em¬ 
ployed an attorney at a guinea a day, for three 



4 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


days ; to destroy such as were useless ; and 
I am afraid that he destroyed several that were 
at least curious. Since that time I have been 
taught, by Mr. John Wilson of Broomhead, to 
understand them in some small degree and 
have wrote upon them what they are, and have 
left this pedigree lest my successors should be 
guilty of the same folly with myself.’ 

Godfrey Bosville seems to have been helped 
by an Alexander Bosville, who, though he 
begins his letters to Godfrey, 4 Honoured Sir,’ 
yet signs himself, 4 Your most affectionate 
kinsman and humble servant.’ A letter of 
his, dated from London on July 19, 1694, is 
addressed to 4 Godfrey Bosville Esq. at Gun- 
thwaite Hall, to be left at Edward Firth’s in 
Sheffield, Yorkshire.’ From Hunter’s pedi¬ 
grees we learn that this Alexander Bosville 

o 

belonged to the Braithwell branch of the family 
and was a printer in London (see page 207). 

The Memoirs seem largely to follow a Pedi¬ 
gree, still at Thorpe, drawn up for Francis 
Bosville of Gunthwaite in the year 1586 by 
Glover, Somerset Herald and Marshal to Norroy 
King-of-Arms ; this Pedigree, emblazoned with 
many coats of arms, is still in excellent preserva¬ 
tion at the present date, 1928. 


THE FOUNDER OF THE FAMILY 


5 


From both Pedigree and Memoirs we learn 
that Sir Martin de Bosville was Treasurer of the 
Conqueror’s army. This assertion is to a cer¬ 
tain extent borne out by the Roll of Battle 
Abbey in the History of Normandy (page 1023), 
which is in the Advocates’ Library, Edin¬ 
burgh, 1 where we are told that the Sieur de 
Bosville had a considerable command in the 
army of William the Conqueror at the memor¬ 
able battle of Hastings, where King Harold 
was slain. Whatever post he held, we find 
that Sir Martin flourished and that he left 
children and lands behind him when he died 
and was buried at Missindry Abbey, which he 
is said to have founded. His wife was the 
daughter of Hugh Lupus, Earl of Chester, and 
they had issue three sons : Anthony, the eldest; 
Richard, ancestor of the Scottish branch of the 
family ; and Clarembald, the Prior of Missindry 
Abbey (since called Faversham) in Kent. 

And the Memoirs go on to state that in 1087 
Sir Martin was Treasurer of England to William 
Rufus the King, and that he died in the fifth 
year of the same king’s reign, 1092, at his 
manor of Chawforth in Buckinghamshire, 
having held the estate twenty-six years—that 

1 See Douglas’s Baronage, page 307. 



6 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


is, since 1066 ; and they go on to say that 
Sir Martin gave lands to his younger children, 

4 which was customary at that time, as money 
was so extremely rare,’ and observe that Ox¬ 
spring in Kent was most likely one of his 
estates, 4 for it was then the method to join 
the name to the nature of the place, as Bosville 
= an ox and a town ; and Oxmuir=an ox and 
a moor;—the place where the Bosvilles first 
settled in Scotland in the Shire of North 
Berwick, Richard his second son going there 
with Queen Margaret in 1068—Oxmuir was 
once called Bosville’s land. The crest, like the 
name of the land, alludes to Bosville—It is a 
Bull in a Bush.’ 

Douglas in his Baronage , under Boswell of 
Balmuto (page 307), remarks, a propos of 
Richard having reached Scotland with Queen 
Margaret, that he more probably came to 
Scotland in the reign of Margaret’s son David, 
who had been educated in England and had 
formed friendships with Normans there and 
had brought back some to Scotland with him, 
bestowing lands on them. The whole article in 
Douglas is very interesting, and so too is the 
one upon Boswell of Auchinleck. 





CHAPTER II 


THE FIRST YORKSHIRE BOSVILLES— 
TWELFTH CENTURY 

(II.) Anthony Bosville, Knight—still to 
quote the Memoirs—son and heir of Sir Martin, 
married Helen, daughter of Thomas Radcliff, 
Knight, and had three sons, William, John, and 
Elias. This latter gave lands to Nostell Abbey 
in Yorkshire, and his gift was confirmed in 
1159, the fifth year of Henry n., according to 
Dugdale’s Monasticon (vol. ii. page 37). This 
benefaction to Nostell by Elias de Bosville, the 
first of that surname to be found in South 
Yorkshire, where Bosvilles were afterwards so 
numerous, was confirmed by William ‘ de 
Warren, 5 son of Prince Henry of Scotland, 
Count of Northumberland, by Ada, a sister of 
the last Earl of Warren of the old line. This 
William c de Warren 5 became in 1165 William 
the Lion, King of Scotland. Hunter, in his 
South Yorkshire (vol. i. pages 376 and 377), 
enters a copy made by him of this confirmation 



8 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


which he found in the great Chartulary of 
Nostell (now in the Cotton Library, Vesp. 
E 19 f. 57). The name of Elias is there recorded 
as Helias de Bossavilla and Nostell is called 
Nostlat. Hunter says that this document 
shows that the Warren part of Barnborough 
was held by Elias de Bosville before the New- 
marches. All this seems a proof of the old 
tradition that a Bosville was the friend of that 
Earl of Warren who became King William the 
Lion of Scotland. 

In vol. i. page 687 of Dugdale’s Monasticon 
we read that King Henry n. confirms 6 from 
William de Bose villa the soccage of the Fee 
in London and Southwark to the Abbey 
of Faversham in Kent, which was founded 
in 1148 the 13th year of King Stephen and 
the lands of Fey which the Abbot Clarembald 
bought. . . .’ Thus the Bosvilles, Clarembald, 
son, and William, grandson, of Sir Martin, are 
connected with the beginnings of Faversham 
Abbey. Their descendant, the writer of the 
Memoirs, notes that the name of William does 
not appear in the Pedigree (Glover), and that 
the only mention of him is in the above con¬ 
firmation grant, but he remarks : c Nor is it of 
any signification as he had no children so was 


THE FIRST YORKSHIRE BOSVILLES 9 


Ancestor to no Family and Benefactor to 
none, for he left his Estate to Charitable Uses; 
that is, to other people’s relations instead of 
his own ; and from that time we hear of no 
Estate y e family had in y e South, where they 
certainly must have had their first settlement 
and might be y 65 reason why we find them so 
immediately settled in y e North, John y* 3 
second son having his Patrimony in Yorkshire 
and from him are my family descended.’ 

This disappointed descendant proceeds to 
remark dryly : 4 Elias, the youngest brother, 
had the same religious zeal to exonerate his 
Father’s descendants from any Incumbrance 
of Gratitude ’ !—referring no doubt to Elias’ 
gift to Nostell—and he adds : 4 The Laity grew 
weak but the Clergy strong ’ by such methods. 

(in.) John de Bosville, Knight, second son 
of Anthony and Helen (Radcliff), married 
Matilda, daughter of Thomas Mounteney, 
Knight, Governor of the Tower of London, 
and had one son, Thomas, and one daughter 
married in the reign of King Stephen to 
Thomas Grimston, Knight, whose grandfather, 
Silvester Grimston, was Standard Bearer to 
William the Conqueror at the battle of 
Hastings, and afterwards his Chamberlain. 



10 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

This John de Bosville is called of Aldersey, an 
evident mistake for Ardesley (Ardsley), of which 
land the chief part, the Manor of New Hall, was 
still retained by the Bosvilles when the Memoirs 
were written and for some time afterwards. 

As the City of London was firmly attached 
to the cause of King Stephen, John de Bosville, 
by his connection with the Governor of the 
Tower, would no doubt share this loyalty and 
may have suffered in consequence, when 
Henry n., the son of Stephen’s rival, the 
Empress Maud, succeeded to the throne. At 
any rate, we next find him giving the name of 
Oxspring, which had belonged to the southern 
estate lost to him, to a tract of barren moor¬ 
land in Yorkshire ; Godfrey Bosville calls this 
the Manor of Oxspring, and says its antiquity 
must be great, being very apparent from the 
4 Modus ’ 1 fixed on it, which was still only ten 
shillings in his day, and remarks 4 the Manor 
was much more considerable at that time than 
it is now, for the suit and service to the Court ’ 
(which probably fixed the Modus) 4 and the 
remaining Chief Rents show that it extended 
over Thurlstone, Carlecoats, Hunshelf and part 

1 A Modus = something paid as a compensation for tithes, on 
the supposition of being a moderate equivalent—Johnson’s 
Dictionary. 


THE FIRST YORKSHIRE BOSVILLES 11 


of Bradfield Chapelry, to Moor Hall and other 
places, as well as to Rough Birch worth. 5 He 
continues : 6 The Townships of Oxspring and 
Hunshelf were not divided till 1686 when two 
Overseers of the Poor were appointed; Edmund 
Stocks for Hunshelf and Richard Willy for 
Oxspring, but in 1685 Jonas Broadhead was 
for both Townships.’ The Manor, he thinks, 
might have been still more extensive originally, 
for it must have been curtailed by the practice 
of giving away portions to younger sons—one 
of these in time assumed the name of 6 de 
Oxspring ’ instead of his own, which was lost; 
and this induced the lord of the manor, who 
afterwards repurchased these lands, to purchase 
the arms too, in case any but a Bosville should 
bear them. These arms, or probably crest, 
seem to have been, for Oxspring, a bull’s head 
in a bush merely, instead of the original whole 
bull of the Bosvilles. 



CHAPTER III 


SETTLING DOWN—THIRTEENTH CENTURY 

(IV.) Thomas de Bosville, Knight, son of 
Sir John and his wife Matilda (Mounteney), 
married the daughter of Hugh de la Nash, 
Knight, of Alisbury, and had a son. 

(V.) John de Bosville of Holme on Spalding 
Moor ; by Riccall in Yorkshire.’ He married 
Agnes, daughter of John, Lord Folyot of Fen¬ 
wick, and had two sons, John and Thomas. 

The fact that John and Agnes did not live at 
Ardsley, as his ancestors had done, is probably, 
the Memoirs tell us, owing to Agnes having a 
better house upon her estate (Holme). Their 
second son, Thomas, had a son, William, who 
married the heiress of John Talun and built a 
house called Bosville, now Bossall, in the North 
Riding of Yorkshire, on the River Derwent. 
This William was Sheriff of Yorkshire for three 
years—forty-ninth, fiftieth, and fifty-first of 
Henry hi. (1266-68). In Drake’s Antiquities 

of York (page 351) he is called William de 
12 


SETTLING DOWN 


13 


Bozale (49 Henry hi. 1266). In Burton’s 
Monasticon Eboracensis (pages 233, 234) there 
is a deed from William de Bosville, Knight, 
and Jane his wife, daughter of John Talun, 
giving the Manor of Kelkparva to the Priory 
of Burlington, which gift was confirmed at 
Westminster by the said William (55 Henry in. 
1271). In this deed he is again named William 
de Bozale. In the List of Sheriffs he is called 
William de Boszall. 

(VI.) John de Bosville, Knight, son and 
heir of John and Agnes (Folyot), married Alice, 
daughter of Hugh and Clarice de Darfield. 
The Memoirs remark of her : 6 Glover calls her 
the heiress, because the following Records name 
two Proprietors for Darfield of the Bosville 
family, therefore I suppose John’s brother 
Thomas married the other daughter and co¬ 
heiress, for William son of Thomas is joint 
owner with his son.’ From this point onwards 
in the Bosville history we get the valuable help 
of the Rev. Joseph Hunter, who has much to 
say of Bosvilles in his History of Hallamshire 
and still more in his History of South Yorkshire , 
and who considers ( S . Yorkshire , vol. ii. page 
109) that with Sir John de Bosville and his 
wife Alice de Darfield begins 4 the authentic 


14 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

and established pedigree of the Bosvilles of 
Yorkshire, an ancient, numerous and influential 
family,’ and quotes an existing charter by 
Alicia, wife of Sir John de Bosville, in which, 
describing herself as 4 Alicia de Boysevil uxor 
D’mi’ Joh’ de Boysevil,’ she grants in her free 
widowhood certain rights to Peter her son, 

4 sicut fecerunt in diebus Hugonis de Derfield 
patris mei.’ This charter Hunter had seen in 
the collection of evidences made by Mr. Wilson 
of Broomhead. 

On the same page Hunter notes that a 
Willielmus de Bossevilla is a witness to a 
charter of Humphrey de Bohun in 1125 ; and 
that Michael, son of William de Bosville, was 
a benefactor to the Abbey of Wardon in Bed¬ 
fordshire, and the same William de Bosville is 
spoken of by Geffery Comes de Maundeville as 
his Knight in the same chartulary. Again, a 
Richard and a Ralph de Bosville were early 
benefactors to the house of de la Pre near 
Northampton (how old Godfrey must have 
groaned over these gifts away from descend¬ 
ants !) ; and in presumption that this Ralph 
was of the same family as the Bosvilles of 
Yorkshire, it is observed that the device upon 
his seal was an ox issuing from a holt or wood, 


SETTLING DOWN 


15 


a badge of distinction used afterwards by the 
Yorkshire family. The name Ralph, too, is 
found later used for younger sons in the York¬ 
shire family. Hunter gives quite a lot of 
charters in which the name of Sir John de 
Bosville appears, and also speaks of a deed in 
which he styles himself 4 Dominus Johannes de 
Bosevil 5 and quit-claims to Thomas de Dichton, 
his seneschal, all demands 4 ab initio mundi 
ad finem seculi 5 ! and he tells of a valuable 
charter making gifts of lands to Peter his son, 
to which John’s seal is still appended. The 
device is a heater shield 1 having the five fusils 
in fess but no charge in chief; there was an 
inscription round it, but it is broken away. 
The seal of Alicia, John’s wife, is also in 
existence ; the device a fleur-de-lis with the 
inscription surrounding it, 4 S ALIC’ D’ 
BOSVIL.’ Part of the deed, to which this 
seal is affixed is a quit-claim in her free 
widowhood to 4 Peter de Boysevil, qui est 
Dominus feodi ’ of a pound of pepper (the word 
is cyminus) which Peter ought to pay for de 
Bykerthorp and Scotrode. 

1 The large elongated f kite-shaped ’ shields of Richard i.’s day 
were in Henry vn.’s reign superseded by the smaller ( heater- 
shaped’ ones. Old Heralds say that the first shield shape was 
copied from Adam’s spade ! 


16 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

Godfrey Bosville remarks that the Bosvilles 
attended the King, as their lands held of 
no baron, ‘ except Brierley, a manor of the 
King’s demesne, of which a temporary gift 
had been made by the King to William le 
Flemming, one of his Low Country com¬ 
manders ’ ; and the King had also made 
William le Flemming patron of the living 
of Darfield, 4 for the first Rector of Darfield 
upon Record was Sir William, son of Robert, 
instituted 1230, presented by William Fland- 
rensis.’ Hunter says (South Yorkshire , vol. ii. 
page 109) that a Swein de Darfield before 1185 
gave eight acres in Ardsley to the monks of 
Bretton. This Swein, Hunter thinks, may be 
an ancestor of Hugh de Darfield, the father of 
Alicia, wife of Sir John Bosville, and says it is 
not impossible that in this line we have the 
progeny of Alsi, the King’s tenant at Darfield 
at the time of the Doomsday survey. Speaking 
of the gift to the Bretton monks, the Memoirs 
record that it was to make a pool or dam in 
the River Durr and to have a mill. Elsewhere 
in the Memoirs we are told that Darfield is 
named from this River Durr flowing through 
fields. 


CHAPTER IV 


LAYING ACRE TO ACRE—FOURTEENTH 

CENTURY 

Sir John and Alicia (Darfield) de Bosville had 
six children. John the eldest married 6 Agnes, 5 
and they had a son, Sir James Bosville of New 
Hall; this son died unmarried and gave New 
Hall to his cousin Robert, Constable of Ponte¬ 
fract. In this Deed of Gift he calls himself Sir 
James Bosville of Middlefield (so says Hunter : 
Godfrey Bosville says of Micklefield), and gives 
to Robert, son of Peter Bosville, all his manors 
of New Hall and all his lands and reversions in 
Darfield, Womb well, Ardsley, Barnsley and 
Gresbrook; dated at New Hall on the Friday 
next after the Feast of the Purification, 3 
Edward hi. 1329. Godfrey Bosville says that 
James leaving so much to Robert can only be 
accounted for by the supposition that Robert 
had married the daughter and heiress of James, 
but Hunter says James died unmarried. 

Of the other six children of John and Alicia, 


18 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

the second son Robert and fourth son William, 
both living in 1296, seem to have left no issue. 
The two daughters were Matilda, who married 
Sir Roger FitzThomas, and Catherine. 

(VII.) It was Peter, the third son, who car¬ 
ried on the family in the early days of the 
fourteenth century when Edward x. was king. 
He had married Beatrix de Furnivall, daughter 
of Gerard, Lord Furnivall, according to the 
Memoirs (and Glover). Huntei' is not so sure, 
but adds, ‘ I would not say that it is on the 
whole improbable that such a marriage should 
have taken place.’ Godfrey Bosville tells us 
that this Lord Furnivall was one of the greatest 
barons of England and that his father was 
one of those who signed Magna Charta. The 
Furnivalls were lords of Hallamshire, and 
Hunter says in his Hallamshire (page 31) that 
Joan Furnivall was the wife of Thomas Bosville 
of Cavil in Yorkshire, and that they have a 
monument in the church at Eastrington in the 
East Riding. Joan was the youngest daughter 
of Thomas Lord Furnivall (who succeeded his 
father and was forty years of age in 1332 ; he 
died at Sheffield in 1339 and was buried in the 
Abbey of Beauchief) and of Joan, the child- 
widow of William de Montacute and eldest 


LAYING ACRE TO ACRE 


19 


daughter and co-heir of Theodore de Verdon, 
a great baron in Staffordshire, by Maud his 
wife, daughter of Edmund Lord Mortimer. 
Lady Furnivall was born 1304, died in childbed 
1334, and was laid with her ancestors in the 
church of Croxden Abbey. It seems likely that 
if one Bosville could marry a Furnivall—and 
Hunter does not dispute Thomas of Cavil’s 
alliance with Joan de Furnivall—another Bos- 
ville’s marriage with another Furnivall is not 
surprising. 

Peter and Beatrix (de Furnivall) had many 
children. Godfrey Bosville’s list differs from 
Hunter’s. He says : c Adam, Beatrice, Dion- 
ysia, Elizabeth, Robert (Constable of Pomfret), 
Philip (living 1325), Edmund (living 9 Edward 
hi.), and Peter.’ Hunter gives the following:— 

1. Adam Bosville, Lord of Ardsley. 

2. Robert Bosville, Constable of Pontefract 

under John of Gaunt. Godfrey Bos¬ 
ville says he married Jane Bosville and 
left only a daughter Elizabeth married 
to yet another Bosville, but Hunter 
shows four generations of his descend¬ 
ants : Sir Thomas Bosville, living 1369 ; 
his son Anthony, living 1383 ; his son, 
another Anthony; and this latter 


20 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

Anthony’s son Robert, who married 
Emma, daughter and heir of John Vesci 
of Coningsborough, of whom the Bos- 
villes of that place and of Warmsworth, 
Braithwell and Ravenfield. 

3 and 4. Philip and Edmund, both living in 
1333. 

5. William, living 1347. 

6 and 7. Isabella and Elizabeth. 

It is a disappointment to hear no more 
of the beautifully-named Dionysia, to say 
nothing of her elder sister Beatrice. Query : 
Can Dionysia possibly have been the wife of 
Elias de Midhope ? of whom we shall hear in 
connection with Penistone Market. In Hunter’s 
South Yorkshire (vol. ii. page 195), in a deed 
dated at Midhope on the Sunday next after the 
Feast of St. Edmund the King, 1299, ‘ Dionysia, 
quandam uxor Domini Elias de Midhope ’ is 
mentioned. Hunter dates Dionysia Bosville s 
father ‘ tempus Edward i.’ who reigned from 
1272 to 1307, so it is just possible. There 
exists at Thorpe a duly attested copy, made 
June 10,1698, and signed by Sir Thomas Trevor, 
of a deed dated 18 Edward i. (1290) which is 
granted by Elias de Midhope of a market for 
Penisale, a town which has utterly vanished. 


LAYING ACRE TO ACRE 


21 


This deed was probably copied for the third 
Godfrey, 6 Justice Bosville,’ who gave a market 
to Penistone in 1699 (see South Yorkshire , vol. ii. 
page 334), for his first idea was to revive the 
Penisale market at Penistone, but this was 
opposed, so he made petition for a new market 
at Penistone, which was granted in 1669. 

To return to the children of Peter and Beatrix. 

(VIII.) Adam, their eldest son, called Lord 
of Ardsley, married Matilda, 4 who brought 
lands at Rykenildthorpe.’ (The marriages of 
the Bosvilles seem ever to have been 4 prudent, 5 
as they consistently enriched the family ; let us 
hope they were also happy !) 

Matilda was dead by 1347, as she is called 
Adam’s 4 late wife ’ in a deed of gift he uttered 
to 4 Roger, son of Thomas Bosville, 5 in that 
year. This deed is witnessed by William, son 
of Adam de Bosville. 

Adam and Matilda had two sons : Thomas, 
mentioned in deeds dated 1344 and 1361 ; and 
William, alive in 1347, as just shown. 

(IX.) The eldest son Thomas married Alicia, 
daughter and heir of John de Gunthwaite and 
Christiana his wife. Hunter, speaking of 
Glover’s 1586 Pedigree, says he has perused a 
large quantity of the evidences of this family 


22 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

(of Bosville), which sustain the said Pedigree 
at so many points that it may reasonably be 
received as throughout correct. He adds that 
the afore-mentioned evidences enable him to 
make some important additions to this Pedigree. 
Thus he inserts the marriage of Thomas and 
Alicia de Gunthwaite on the authority of an 
old pedigree of the Lords of Gunthwaite, sup¬ 
ported by the facts that the Bosvilles were 
allowed to quarter the arms of Gunthwaite, 
and that about the time of this Thomas their 
connection with that manor and family began. 

Godfrey Bosville’s Memoirs, speaking of 
Alicia de Gunthwaite, the wife of Thomas de 
Bosville, observes : 6 Thus ended in an Heiress 
y e Ancient family of Gunilthweyth. The old 
Pedigree names five generations before y 6 
Conquest—four before Roger ante Conquestum. 
The very name shows its Antiquity ; it is in the 
old Celtic language of a great part of Europe 
and of this Island before the Romans or any 
other Strangers invaded it.’ The name means 
the c thwait ’ or plot of ground of Gunn. By 
a much later marriage (1768) the old possession 
of Gunn was carried again into a Celtic family 
—that of Macdonald of the Isles—and it is a 
curious coincidence that one of their line, Hugh 


LAYING ACRE TO ACRE 


28 


of Sleat, married Mary Gunn of Caithness. 
This old property has never been sold since 
the days of Thomas and Alicia, but inherited 
only, though twice through females—Alicia de 
Gunthwaite and Elizabeth Diana Bosville—and 
is still possessed by their descendant, Sir 
Alexander Bosville Macdonald of the Isles. 

When Godfrey Bosville wrote his Memoirs 
the old mansion remained, and he describes 
the old motto over the door, 4 TRY AND 
TRYST,’ and the crest, also over the door and 
on the hall chimney, as a bird on one foot, and 
also speaks of the arms at the north end of 
the house, opposite to the stables, 4 3 red Bends 
in a field ermine,’ and concludes, 4 There is no 
Mark of the Bosvilles, though they have had 
it above 400 years.’ The stables, however, 
were rebuilt by the third Godfrey Bosville, and 
have upon them 

B 

G B 

1690 

for Godfrey and Bridget Bosville; and at 
some time the stone beams of what must have 
been the hall have been carved at the inter¬ 
sections with the arms of the marriages of 
Bosvilles : such as Bosville with Hardwick; 


24 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

with Copley ; with Hotham, etc. There has 
been some difference of opinion as to whether 
the house at Gunthwaite was a good one or 
not—Hunter rather gives the idea that it was 
not; but a letter at Thorpe from Mrs. Clarke 
of Noblethorpe, the nearest place to Gun¬ 
thwaite, written about 1879 to the Hon. Mrs. 
Bosville, tells that she has seen in past days old 
people who remembered the house, and that 
they described it as 4 big enough for anybody, 
with fine rooms,’ and that c there used to be 
great doings there.’ It was stone below, and 
black and white, like the barn, above, the wood 
much carved and decorated, it is said, with 
life-size figures. This interesting old house 
was pulled down almost entirely in the nine¬ 
teenth century, so it is related, by a mad agent 
named Earnshaw. At Thorpe there are some 
pieces of painted glass which were picked up in 
the field below the house of Gunthwaite ; these 
have evidently formed part of a window with 
a plan of Gunthwaite upon it. On these pieces, 
now put together, one reads : 

‘ A Ground Plot of Gunthwaite Hall 
with the outhouses containing 
3 A 1 R 15 P. 

1691.’ 


LAYING ACRE TO ACRE 


25 


A bunch of fine old keys, some with curiously 
interwoven metal-work handles, labelled 6 Gun- 
thwaite 1717,’ remainSat Thorpe. Now, alas ! 
they open nothing. An old stone summer¬ 
house remains in the pleasant garden ; it has 
the Bosville arms, the initials G. B. B. (for 
Godfrey and Bridget Bosville), and the date 
of the year, 1688, above its door. But this is 
anticipating events. It was, however, to this 
actual house that Thomas came courting and 
from which he won his bride, Alicia de Gun- 
thwaite, in the days of Edward hi. Near, too, 
must then, as now, have been Gunthwaite Lane, 
a pretty stone-step path among trees leading 
to the c wishing well ’ ; and at the bottom of 
the field in front of the house there would then 
also be the same small lake as now exists, the 
water of which was considered very beneficial 
to invalids, so that later it received the name 
of Gunthwaite Spa, and even now the old 
custom of visiting it and even bathing in it is 
still observed on the first Sunday in May, to a 
certain extent. The water at the well-spring 
is undoubtedly sulphureous, but in former days 
this taste was considered to have its origin in 
silver ore underground, a little of that metal 
having been found on Gunthwaite land. At 


26 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


one time c Spa Sunday ’ at Gunthwaite was a 
festival attended by thousands of people from 
all quarters, who sang and danced by the edge 
of the water and were fed from stalls purposely 
erected and stocked with festival food. The 
old oak tree, which till the beginning of this 
twentieth century stood behind the old Gun¬ 
thwaite Hall, must have been a glorious tree 
in the days of Thomas and Alicia. It is sup¬ 
posed to date back to very early times. This 
famous old tree measured thirty-six feet round 
the bole ; but now it has, sad to say, com¬ 
pletely vanished. There are a good many 
things preserved at Thorpe made from its 
wood by Hawley of Penistone, 1 a carpenter 
descended from the old house carpenter of 
Gunthwaite ; the most notable of these is a 
frame enclosing an Address from the West 
Riding tenants to Alexander Wentworth Mac¬ 
donald Bosville (the present owner of Gun¬ 
thwaite and Thorpe) upon his coming of age 
in 1886. The top of this frame is copied from 
an old beam found under a garden seat at 
Gunthwaite (it now hangs under the eave of a 
garden barn at Thorpe), and is carved with the 

1 This man was employed to make all the woodwork for the wing 
added to Thorpe Hall in 1886. 


LAYING ACRE TO ACRE 


27 


bird on one foot and the motto, 4 Try and 
Tryst. 5 The Memoirs tell us that Godfrey 
Bosville saw this bird upon a seal belonging 
to John de Gunnildthwayt, the witness of the 
deed on which the seal hangs. Upon this seal 
is inscribed 4 JOH AQUILLA,’ 1 and Godfrey 
suggests that the bird may be an eagle. 

The Gunthwaites appear to have lived at 
Gunthwaite during the days of Lacis, Byrtons 
and Darcys, as their tenants, until a charter, 
now in the British Museum (49 Dl), gave the 
manor from Henry Darcy to John de Gonnild- 
thwaite, eighth year of Edward in. This 
tenancy is shown in a pedigree drawn up in 
the reign of Henry vn., in which there appears 
a series of Byrtons and Gunthwaites. The last 
Byrton was an heiress who married Darcy, 
whose grandson sold the place to John de 
Gunnoldthwaite. Hunter says Godfrey Bos- 

1 Aquila—of this surname, f which was originally assumed from 
the town of Aquila in Normandy, was Gilbert de Aquila, possessed 
of the Honor of Pevensey in Sussex, a faithful servant of the 
Conqueror and of his son, William Rufus. Gilbert’s son Richard 
was one of those who took arms against King Henry the First 
in behalf of Curthose (Robert, Duke of Normandy, eldest son 
of Henry i.). He afterwards came to accord with King Henry n., 
but of his Posterity very little is said after that time, and in 5 
Henry in. this whole Honor was given to Prince Edward and his 
Heirs, Kings of England, so that it should never be separated from 
the Crown.’—From Collins’s Peerage , vol. ii. London, 1714. 


28 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


ville possessed this pedigree, but it cannot now 
be found. 

Thomas de Bosvilie not only added a pro¬ 
perty to his family possessions, but also added 
to his arms. Godfrey in the Memoirs tells us, 
giving as his authority vol. i. of Rapin’s History 
of England , that Thomas de Bosvilie fought in 
the battle of Poitiers in 1356, and on that field 
slew 4 a French knight.’ By itself this does not 
sound a great achievement on a day when so 
many French knights perished, but there must 
have been some special virtue in the deed, for 
on this account Thomas 4 won in battle ’ the 
three black bears’ heads upon the Bosvilie 
shield. 

It is rather curious that, while Thomas was 
fighting for King Edward at Poitiers, another 
ancestor of the present owner of Gunthwaite 
was fighting there for King John of France. 
This was 4 the good ’ John of Isla, Lord of the 
Isles, who was taken prisoner there and brought 
to London. 

Thomas de Bosvilie apparently had to borrow 
money, for Hunter tells us (South Yorkshire , 
vol. ii. page 112) how New Hall and its posses¬ 
sions were 4 delivered out of the hands ’ of 
Sir William de la Pole, the great merchant of 


LAYING ACRE TO ACRE 


29 


Ravensrode and Hull, who had evidently 
advanced cash on the security of the New Hall 
and Ardsley, etc., estate. 

In 1371 we find Thomas called into the 
Court of the Honour of Pontefract to show 
cause why he should not do service for his 
lands at Ardsley ; when he pleaded that the 
moiety of Ardsley was held of the manor of 
New Hall, which was held of the castle of 
Skipton and so not within the fee of the Duke 
of Lancaster; that eight bovates are held of 
the manor of Brierley, which is in the Duke’s 
fee, and that the residue is held of Sir John 
Fitzwilliam, as of his manor of Woodhall, at 
the rent of a pair of spurs, and that Sir John 
holds the manors of the said Duke, etc. 

In 1381 Thomas obtained a grant of free 
warren in all his demesne lands of Denby, 
Gunthwaite, Cawthorne, Barnsley, Keresford, 
Ardsley, Darfield, Wombwell and Worsborough. 
Truly a goodly list of lands to show for the 
three hundred years his family had now lived 
in England. After some complication of deeds 
(all are to be found in Hunter’s South York¬ 
shire, vol. ii. page 112), New Hall was given by 
Thomas in 1388 to Thomas (his grandson, son 
of Roger de Bosville) and Margaret his wife. 


30 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

This deed was made at the New Hall and must 
have been signed just before the death of 
Thomas. He and his wife Alicia de Gunthwaite 
had three sons and a daughter : Roger, the 
eldest, living in 1379 ; Thomas, from whom the 
Bosvilles of Chevet; Richard and Margaret. 

The Memoirs mention a settlement made by 
Sir Thomas de Bosville upon AJicia, widow of 
his son Roger, and then on his grandson William, 
who got New Hall, his elder brother John 
having Ardsley. Thus we see that Roger died 
before his father and that his wife’s Christian 
name was the same as his mother’s ; and upon 
this Alicia, whose maiden surname we are not 
told, Gunth waite was settled. She and Roger 
had three sons : Thomas, living 1388, but must 
soon have died, and he left no heirs ; John, the 
next head of the family ; and William, the 
third son, who got New Hall. He married 
c Joan,’ but evidently had no son, as we 
presently find New Hall and Ardsley together 
again in the possession of William’s nephew 
John. But he apparently had a daughter, 
married to Sir John Nevill of Chevet (see South 
Yorkshire , vol. ii. page 108). 


CHAPTER V 


FIFTEENTH-CENTURY HEIRESSES 

(X.) John Bosville of Ardsley, second son 
of Roger, married Isabel, daughter and co-heir 
(with Agnes, wife of John Wentworth) of Sir 
William Dronsfield, Knight, of West Bretton. 
(Again an heiress !) 

They had one son, named, like his father, 
(XI.) John Bosville of New Hall and Ardsley. 
He was twice married, first, to Mary, daughter 
and co-heir (with Margaret, wife of John Drax) 
of Thomas Barley and Isabel his wife, the 
daughter and heir of John of the Wood Hall. 
By her he had one son, William, of Ardsley and 
New Hall, who married Matilda, daughter of 
Sir John Fitzwilliam of Sprotborough; and 
secondly, to Isabel, daughter of Percival Cres- 
acre of Barnborough, executrix to her husband. 
(She married, secondly, Henry Langton, Esq., 
before 1448, after whose death she took the veil 
of chastity. She was alive in 1480.) 

This Isabel founded the Chantry of St. Mary 

31 


32 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

in Cawthorne Church ; the foundation dates 
from the Feast of St. Margaret (August 20) 
1455, and its dissolution as a chantry took place 
in the first year of Edward vi. (1547). Henry 
Langton, Isabel’s second husband, is named 
with her in the Deed of Foundation, and the 
chantry priest is to pray daily 4 for our good 
estate and the good estate of Henry and Isabel 
while they live and for our souls when we die 
and especially for the soul of the said John 
Boswell and for the souls of his parents, 
ancestors,’ etc., and 4 for all the faithful and 
‘ to be for ever called The Chantry of John 
Boswell at the altar of St. Mary the Virgin in 
the Chapel of St. Michael at Calthorne.’ The 
6 for ever ’ lasted ninety-three years ! but the 
chantry, though now used as the burial-place 
of the Spencer-Stanhope family of Cannon Hall, 
is still called the Bosville Chantry. The founda¬ 
tion ordered that the chaplain was to be con¬ 
stantly resident, and if he went away and 
remained away for twenty-two days he might 
be removed from his office. Such chaplains do 
not seem to have borne a high character, for the 
deed, after arranging for his duties and his 
emoluments and his constant residence, goes on 
to say : 4 But if through age or infirmity he 


























ALL THAT IS LEFT OF GUNTHAVAITE HALL 








FIFTEENTH-CENTURY HEIRESSES 33 


should be unable to officiate in the chapel, or 
shall be thrown into prison (!) except on 
account of felony (!!) or if he be addicted to 
frequent taverns or to play at unlawful games ; 
if after three admonitions he does not forbear, 
it shall be lawful for the said Isabel and her 
heirs to appoint another chaplain in his place.’ 
The chaplain was to be a secular, not a regular, 
nor under the rule of any religious house. The 
chaplain in Henry viii.’s reign was 4 Master 
Richard Wygfall, cantarist.’ At the suppres¬ 
sion of the chantry, £5, 4s. was given from the 
endowment to the parish school, which con¬ 
tinues to receive this grant from the Chancellor 
of the Duchy of Lancaster. 1 

John and Isabel (Cresacre) Bosville had four 
sons and one daughter—Elizabeth, who mar¬ 
ried Thomas Anne. The eldest son, Richard, 
settled by his parents at 4 Gunthwaite-in- 
Peniston,’ became the ancestor of the Bosvilles 
of that place. The second and third sons, 
Percival and James, were alive in 1472. The 
fourth son, John, married a daughter of Rockley 
of Rockley; his line became extinct four 
generations later (see Pedigree, pp. 228-229). 

1 See History of Cawthorne, pp. 140, 143, by the Rev. Charles 
Pratt (1882). 

C 



34 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


John Bosville died on the Friday after the 
Feast of the Assumption, 20 Henry vi. 1441. 
His father’s marriage with the heiress of Drons- 
field brought with it, says Hunter, a consider¬ 
able increase of possessions, and not less his 
own marriage with one of the two heiresses of 
the Lords of Wood Hall; this lady also brought 
with her the nomination to one of the two 
rectories of Darfield, and we find that two of 
the Bosvilles held this living. 

In the pages of the Memoirs we find some 
talk about the price of food in the fifteenth 
century. After remarking that in a book by 
Bishop Fleetwood called Chronicon Portiosum , 
he found that one hundred and eighteen years 
ago a fat ox sold for 6s. 8d., Godfrey Bosville 
goes on to give the price of food as taken from 
a Bill of Fare belonging to the Wax Chandlers’ 
Company, in connection with the Lord Mayor’s 
Feast on 29th October 1478, 17 Edward iv., and 
quotes : 


A Loin of Beef 
A Leg of Mutton 
Two Loins of Veal and\ 
Tv r o Legs of Mutton J 
A Goose 
A Capon 


£ s. d. 
0 0 4 

0 0 2J 

0 14 

0 0 6 
0 0 6 




FIFTEENTH-CENTURY HEIRESSES 35 


A dozen of Pidgeons 
A Pig and a Rabbit 
100 of Eggs . 

A Gallon of Wine . 
A Kilderkin of Ale . 


£ S m dm 

0 0 7 

0 0 6 

0 0 81 

0 0 8 

0 18 


The pig and rabbit seem a very odd com¬ 
bination, and one rabbit in these days of hearty 
appetite sounds absurd. Ale, the old English 
drink, was, I believe, made without hops. On 
the addition of hops, the drink was called beer. 

As this chronicle is chiefly interested in the 
Gunthwaite branch of the Bosville family, we 
will leave William Bosville (the eldest son of 
John Bosville by his first marriage with Mary 
Barley) and his wife Matilda, daughter of Sir 
John Fitzwilliam of Sprotborough, reigning in 
Ardsley, and will follow the fortunes of his half- 
brother Richard at Gunthwaite. (The de¬ 
scendants of William of Ardsley will be found 
in the New Hall Pedigree, pp. 228-230.) But 
first let us quote a letter from the fourth God¬ 
frey Bosville (he of the Memoirs) written from 
Great Russell Street on January 3, 1782 1 to 
Mr. Wilson of Broomhead. He writes : 4 Though 
there was never any lord in my family, yet my 

1 See Notes from Letters to John Wilson, Esq. of Broomhead, 
Add. MSS. 24475, folio 301, British Museum. 

A 


36 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

ancestors were ranked among the gentry when 
the ancestors of many a lord were of low degree. 
New Hall was built in Edward n.’s time, which 
remains with the Manor now, for the old Hall 
and Ardsley were given to three sons of a second 
wife by a Deed in which it is specified that each 
of the three is to have a third part of the Manor. 
I question whether they have not lost the 
counterpart of this Deed for neither Benj. 
Micklethwaite nor his nephew seem to know by 
what claim they hold the Manor. New Hall I 
still have, though by the purchase of my Uncle, 
for it was sold in that time by the last of that 
Branch which was then extinct, yet still it was 
the estate of my Ancestors and had not been 
long out of the Name. Since the time you first 
gave me some idea of old writings and pedigrees, 
you see I have made a tolerable progress, but 
without liking it myself, I should have made 
none at all.’ 

It is difficult not to regret that the grandson 
of the Godfrey who writes, Godfrey the third 
Lord Macdonald, evidently did not share his 
grandfather’s c liking,’ for he, alas ! sold New 
Hall finally out of the family. 

(XII.) Richard, the second son of John 
Bosville but the eldest of those of his second 


FIFTEENTH-CENTURY HEIRESSES 37 


marriage with Isabel Cresacre, had Gunthwaite 
and c other lands 5 (part of these was Cawthorne 
and the Chantry), says Hunter, c by gift of 
his mother,’ upon whom Gunth waite must 
have been settled, and he tells us that Richard 
died in 1501 and was buried at Beighton, where 
his monument may still be seen in the church. 
He had married Jane, daughter of Sir Thomas 
Nevill, Knight, of Liversedge, and they had 
three sons and four daughters. The daughters 
all married: Elizabeth to John Popeley; 

Catherine to John Swift; Edith to-Proctor 

and Alice to-Rowley. Of the second and 

third sons we hear nothing. The eldest belongs 
to the next chapter. 




CHAPTER VI 


IN TUDOR DAYS—SIXTEENTH CENTURY 

This eldest son is described as 

(XIII.) John Bosville of Gunthwaite, Esq., 
living 1516, and with reference to him and his 
successors the fourth Godfrey Bosville remarks : 
4 From this time there were no more knights 
in the Family; nor had Knighthood been 
hitherto a mark of Honour, but of Property. 
Every man was entitled to it that had a 
Knight’s fee. Henceforward few took that 
Title, except such as were knighted by y* 5 King, 
especially after the institution of the Order of 
the Garter by Edward hi., though still Dominus 
or Sir was given to such as had taken a degree, 
which makes many Parsons in Shakespeare’s 
and other old Plays be mistaken for Knights, 
by being called Sir John or Sir Hugh. Even 
now, in 1766, ^ custome remains of adding 
Dominus, which they translate Sir, tho’ it means 
no more than Mr. and add it to their surnames, 
and that only in the University of Cambridge 
and at Queen's College in Oxford.’ 

38 


IN TUDOR DAYS 


39 


John Bosville married Ann, daughter of 
Thomas Clapham of Beamsley and widow of 
Richard Redman of Harwood. 

John is described as 6 of Beighton ’ in 1516, 
when he and his son, also named John, were 
appointed attorneys to receive a certain charter 
from Henry Colombell. 

Richard Bosville, his son John, and his grand¬ 
son John seem all to have lived a good deal 
at Beighton, where, says Hunter, they were 
farmers of the estate to Lord Dacre of the 
South. 

John Bosville and Ann (Clapham) his wife 
had three sons and several daughters. Hunter 
remarks disapprovingly that the daughters all 
married c persons remote from Yorkshire and 
Derbyshire,’ and gives a list as follows : Ellen 
married to Gibson alias Taylor (!); Dionysia 

to Henry Pigot of Croydon; Ann to - 

Denny; Agnes to Thomas Cook of Cam¬ 
bridgeshire ; and Elizabeth to John Sheffield 
of Epworth—he at least had a Yorkshire 
sounding name ! 

The three sons were : John, son and heir; 
Thomas Bosville of Tickhill, who married Ann 
Sanderson ; and Richard, a clerk. 

(XIV.) John, the second of that name, 



40 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


of Gunthwaite, married Muriel, daughter of 
Charles Barnby of Barnby, Esq. This lady’s 
descent from William the Conqueror is shown 
by Baverstock in his 4 Some Account of Maid¬ 
stone, with genealogical tables of the Bosville 
family, 1822 ’ (see Appendix I). John and 
Muriel’s home seems to have been at Beighton, 
for John is described as 4 of Beighton Esq.’ in 
38 Henry viii. (1542) when he had a grant from 
John Boswell of Belhouse Grange near Wel- 
beck, gentleman, of the wardship and marriage 
of his son and heir Christopher; and also in a 
release dated 2 Elizabeth (1560) given by 
Merial Bosville of London to Godfrey Bosville, 
son, heir and executor of the said John. 

John Bosville died February 12, 33 Henry 
viii. John and Muriel (Barnby) Bosville had 
three sons : the Godfrey just mentioned, Ralph, 
and Henry of London, cloth-worker and citizen. 
All that is known of this third son is that he w r as 
placed as apprentice to Sir William Hewet, 
citizen and cloth-worker, and was admitted to 
the freedom of his Company in the first year 
of Queen Elizabeth (1558), and that he was 
living in 1569 and 1580, when he is mentioned 
as executor in his brother Godfrey’s will. 

Ralph, the second son, was twice married, 


IN TUDOR DAYS 


41 


and each time in the south. He seems to have 
gone to London with his younger brother Henry. 
His first wife was Ann, daughter of Sir Richard 
Clement of the Mote, Ightham, Kent; and his 
second wife was Benedicta, daughter of Anthony 
Skinner of London. 

Ralph Bosville was Clerk of the Court of 
Wards, a court established in 1540 to make 
certain inquiries, on the death of a tenant-in¬ 
chief, into the extent of his possessions and the 
age of his heir, in order that the King’s rights 
might be exacted. This court was abolished in 
1660. In this office Ralph made a great for¬ 
tune, and employed part of his wealth to buy 
the rectory manor of Penistone, which he con¬ 
veyed to his eldest brother Godfrey. An inven¬ 
tory of the dues to the Vicar of Penistone exists 
at Thorpe, made and settled at a meeting of 
the parishioners on January 17, 1719. ‘It was 
agreed,’ says this paper, 6 upon a Solemn 
Debate and hearing of all parties ... to put 
an end to all disputes for the future, that the 
dues hereafter mentioned shall, accordinge to 
Custome be taken . . . and entered in the 
Parish Book.’ This pious resolution is signed 
first by 4 Wm. Bosseville ’ and then by nineteen 
other parishioners—two of whom can only 


42 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


make 4 his mark,’ and finally by the Vicar, who 
puts, 4 I doe agree hereto, Edward Jackson, 
Vicar of the said Parish.’ (In the tw T o hundred 
years from 1500 to 1700 we notice that the 
rector has become a vicar.) The dues are : 

£ s. d. 

For a Marriage . . . 00 = 02=4 

For a Certificate of Marriage . 00=00=6 

Burial ..... 00=00=7 

Christening and Churching . 00=00=11J 

But in speaking of Ralph, Hunter tells us that 
4 his great purchases were in Kent, where the 
descendants of his two sons Henry and Sir 
Robert were among the principal gentry of the 
Country, as long as they continued.’ These 
purchases v T ere first Bradbourn, some time in 
Elizabeth’s reign and after he had been 
knighted, then Blackball (now in the Knole 
estate) and Eynsford. A wood still called 
Bowzell (Bosville ?), probably part of this pro¬ 
perty, now belongs to Colin Frederick Campbell, 
Esq., of Everlands, Sevenoaks, the father of the 
wife of Godfrey Bosville Macdonald, the son 
of the writer and Sir Alexander Macdonald of 
the Isles. The only paper at Thorpe referring 
to this property is the original and signed 
petition of 4 Thomas Bosevile of Aynsford, in 


IN TUDOR DAYS 


43 


the county of Kent, Knight,’ about his estate to 
6 the Supream Authority of this Nation, the 
Parliament of the Commonwealth of England.’ 

Ralph’s first wife, Ann Clement, was the 
daughter of Sir Richard Clement (the builder 
of the Moat-house at Ightham) and his wife 
Anne, widow of John Grey, brother of Thomas, 
second Marquis of Dorset, who were grandsons 
of Elizabeth Woodville (by her first marriage 
with Sir John Grey of Groby), Queen Consort 
of Edward rv. 1 Ann (Clement) Bosville was 
the mother of Ralph’s children, who were : 
Henry Bosville, from whom the Bosvilles of 
Bradbourn ; Sir Robert Bosville, from whom 
the Bosvilles of Eynsford; and Ralph Bosville, 
third son, on whom and his issue Gunthwaite 
was settled, and who was a captain of the 
army in Ireland, where he died. His wife was 
Mary, daughter of Christopher Copley of Wad- 
worth. They were married at Sprotborough, 
in Yorkshire, April 10, 1592, and had a son, 
Godfrey, afterwards the second Godfrey Bos¬ 
ville of Gunthwaite. After Ralph’s presumably 
early death in Ireland, his wife Mary Copley 
remarried with Fulke Greville, Esq., of Thorpe 

1 This information is taken from an article by Alfred Rimmer in 
the Manchester Guardian of 1st November 1890; he quotes as 
authority ‘the Lawford Title-deeds.’ 


44 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


Latimer, Co. Lincoln. They also were married 
at Sprotborough, just ten years after Mary’s 
first wedding, on July 15, 1602. They had a 
son, Robert Lord Brooke, slain at Lichfield in 
1643 ; and a daughter, Dorothy, who married 
Sir Arthur Hesilrigge. 

Before returning to the Gunthwaite line, let 
us see what became of the first Sir Ralph Bos- 
ville. He settled at Bradbourn in Kent, and 
was buried at Sevenoaks August 8, 1580. 

Weever in his Funeral Monuments (page 
797) has a notice of him. He says that the 
inhabitants of Sevenoaks (he calls it Sevenoke) 
still spoke of him as 4 having whilst he lived 
been employed upon many occasions for the 
public, and deserving and having the reputation 
of a most worthy patriot ’ ; and he revives the 
epigram, 4 written by some well-wishing versi¬ 
fier of the times,’ in reference to Sir Ralph’s 
grandson, another Ralph : 

4 Dii tibi dent, Bosville, boves, villasque Radolphe, 
Nec villa careat bosve, vel ilia bove,’ 

which may be translated thus : 

‘ May the gods give to thee, Bosville, 

The oxen and country-houses of Ralph, 

And may the house never lack an ox 
Nor the ox an house.’ 


IN TUDOR DAYS 


45 


The will of Henry Bosville, eldest son of Sir 
Ralph, was seen in 1917 by Mr. Charles 
Phillips, who contributed several articles on 
Kentish families, including that of Bosville, to 
the Sevenoaks Chronicle in the spring of that 
year. In this will, three sons and two daugh¬ 
ters are mentioned : Ralph, Lewkner, and 
George ; Frances (died young), and Elizabeth, 
who married Thomas Petley of Halsted. Their 
mother was the daughter of William Morgan by 
his wife Katherine, one of the daughters of Sir 
Roger Lewkenor, Knight, of Bodiam Castle, 
Sussex. Through Katherine Lewkenor, Ralph, 
her grandson, enjoyed a moiety of Bodiam 
Castle. 4 This Sir Ralph Bosville, Knight, was 
born in 1578, was married to Mary Lennard in 
1594, and must have succeeded , 5 says Lord 
Curzon in his 4 Survey of Bodiam Castle , 5 pub¬ 
lished 1926, 4 to his moiety not long afterwards ; 
for I have in my possession Court Rolls showing 
that in 1607, 1608, 1612, 1613, 1614, and 1615 
Courts were held in his name as Lord of the 
Manor, associated with Thomas Levett, gent. ; 
the Steward of the Manor being Richard 
Amherst, who, later, in 1626 is described as 
Serjeant-at-Law. It is clear, therefore, that 
these two persons [Sir Ralph Bosville and 


46 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

Thomas Levett] were joint owners of the 
estate.’ Thomas Levett had bought his share 
from Constance Lewkenor and her second 
husband, Edward Glenham of Chichester. 
Constance and Katherine, Mrs. Morgan, whose 
daughter Elizabeth was the wife of Henry Bos- 
ville and mother of Sir Ralph, were sisters. 

The Bosvilles of Bradbourn had the same 
arms as the Bosvilles of Gunthwaite, except 
that the three bears’ heads appear muzzled or — 
as they are now borne by Sir Alexander Bosville 
Macdonald of the Isles. 

Mary Lennard, Sir Ralph’s wife, was the 
daughter of Sampson Lennard of Knole and 
Chevening and of Lady Margaret Dacre of the 
South, his wife. A very fine full-length por¬ 
trait of this Sir Ralph Bosville hangs in the 
Leicester Gallery at Knole ; it is attributed to 
Van Somer of Antwerp, who arrived in England 
about 1606. The picture measures 85 inches 
by 45 inches, and shows Sir Ralph in Court 
dress. He is mentioned in the Diary of Lady 
Anne Clifford, written when she lived at Knole 
with her first husband, the Earl of Dorset. She 
says he came to see her there, and that 4 he 
played and sung to me in the afternoon,’ 
evidently to cheer her up, as a little time 



IN TUDOR DAYS 


47 


before she writes, 4 I found myself weak and 
ill.’ 1 

There is an old print of 4 Bradborne near 
Sevenoke in the Co. of Kent,’ of which there is 
a copy at Thorpe. It shows a coach and six 
followed by a solitary rider arriving at the 
Hall, which looks a good-sized, comfortable 
country house with a decorative low bell-tower 
near it on the north; the Hall is set in a lawn 
with trees all about it, and seems to lie west 
by east. On the south is a circular projection, 
a later addition probably to the original plan, 
and further south is a stretch of ornamental 
water which, by the description appended to 
the print, is supplied by 4 a fast-running stream ’ 
which skirts the stable yard. The entrance 
porch is at the west end. The house is now 
(1928) all surrounded by railways, and is to 
be sold. No doubt it will fall a victim to the 
builders of bungalows, alas ! 

Sir Ralph’s knighthood was bestowed upon 
him at Whitehall July 23, 1603, 4 about the 
time of His Majesty’s Coronation ’ (James i. and 
vi.), and there was once at Gunthwaite a 
certificate from Camden, Clarencieux, on the 
part and behalf of Sir Ralph, telling of his 

1 See Dr, Williamson’s Lady Anne Clifford, page 129 and note. 


48 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


knighting, and adding that c the said Sir Ralph 
is a gentleman of quality and blood, and fair 
and antient coat armour, and of pure and un¬ 
doubted lineal descent and uninterrupted deri¬ 
vation from antient nobility and from divers 
noble knights and esquires of this kingdom, his 
ancestors, as well of his own surname as also 
of other noble surnames and right worthy 
families ; and that by his marriage with Mary, 
the second daughter of the noble lady Margaret, 
Baroness Dacre of the South, he is allied and 
linked to very many of the most antient, 
worthy and prime blood and nobility of this 
kingdom. All this by the view and examina¬ 
tion of the worthy descents and fair and far- 
extending pedigrees of the said Sir Ralph 
Bosville, Knight, and his ancestors I find plainly 
and evidently proved and demonstrated to me 
by authentic records and evidence.’ Dated 
Sept. 21, 1621. Hunter has preserved this in 
his South Yorkshire (vol. ii. pages 348, 349); it 
no longer exists, and must, sad to say, be one 
of the papers that the fourth Godfrey Bosville 
paid an attorney a guinea a day to destroy ! 
Later, as we know, his repentance of this fatal 
proceeding made him write the Memoirs. 

There were not many more generations at 



BODIAM CASTLE, SUSSEX, FROM RUCK'S VIEWS 



















IN TUDOR DAYS 


49 


Bradbourn, so let us finish the tale of them here. 
Sir Ralph was buried January 22, 1634/35, and 
administration was granted to his eldest son 
Sir Lennard. This son, at the age of only 
fifteen, had in 1613 been married to Anne, 
eldest daughter and co-heir of Sir Thomas 
Ridley, Knight, by whom he had no issue. He 
only survived his father five years, dying 
February 1639/40. His wife Anne renounced 
the succession to Bradbourn, and it passed to 
Lennard’s elder sister Margaret, the wife of 
her kinsman Sir William Bosville, whom she 
had married in 1629. He was British Resident 
at The Hague for twenty-one years for King 
Charles i. He died in April 1650, and Dame 
Margaret, well known for her scholastic bene¬ 
factions to Sevenoaks, died in 1682 after a long 
widowhood. She had suffered eight years’ 
sequestration of her estates by the Common¬ 
wealth, but they were restored to her in 1651, 
after her husband’s death. She left them to 
her kinsman William Bosville, and he to his 
son Henry Bosville, who never married. Dame 
Margaret was buried on July 31, 1682, in St. 
Nicholas’ Church, Sevenoaks. 

We must now return to the eldest son of John 
and Muriel (Barnby) Bosville, who was the first 

d 


50 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

Godfrey Bosville (XV.) of Gunthwaite. He at 
first describes himself in documents as 4 of 
Beighton,’ but later (in 1545, on a receipt for 
tithes) as of Gunth waite ; and also in 1550, 
when he was engaged in a suit respecting lands 
there ; and again as 4 of Ganuldthwayte 5 in a 
receipt given by Thomas Dawnay, for money 
paid to him in the parish church of Snaith, 
according to an award made by Sir Francis 
Hastings and others. This first Godfrey cer¬ 
tainly lived at Gunth waite and did much for the 
property. It was he who obtained from the 
Lord Mounteagle, who then represented the 
Nevills and through them the line of one of the 
co-heirs of Adam fitzSwein, a ratification of a 
charter from Sir Robert Xevill to John Gonnil- 
twayte, to the effect, as there recited, that 
Robert granted to John the manor of Gonnil- 
twayte with its appurtenances and an assart 
in Gonniltwayte called Colmanclif, with all 
commons and liberties, etc., to hold of the said 
Robert at a rent of 5d. The date of this 
charter is not recited, but Hunter says there 
cannot be a doubt that it was coincident with 
the grant by Darcy (see page 27), now in the 
British Museum—8 Edward m. (1280). God¬ 
frey also took a grant twenty-three years later 


IN TUDOR DAYS 


51 


from Sir Thomas Stanley, Lord Mounteagle, 
under the description of Godfrey Bosville, Esq., 
lord of the manor of Gunthwaite and Oxspring 
and Ingbirchworth. He had purchased Ox¬ 
spring and also took a grant from his brother 
Ralph of the rectory, manor, and presentation 
of the church of Peniston, and in various ways 
advanced his family. He it was, too, who 
built the famous Gunthwaite Barn, still stand¬ 
ing and in fine condition, behind the remains of 
the Hall. It is a wooden black and white 
building of eleven bays and with three threshing 
floors, and is 55 yards long by 15 yards wide. 
Mr. Wilson of Broomhead measured it and noted 
this over one hundred years ago. The building 
is all held together by wooden pegs; it contains 
not one single iron nail. Tradition says that an 
apprentice spent the whole of his seven years 
in bond making wooden pegs for Gunthwaite 
Barn! The interior with its great beams is very 
fine, and it and the doors are wide enough, 
says Mr. Wilson, 6 for a wain and six oxen to 
turn in it.’ This first Godfrey Bosville married 
Jane, daughter of John Hardwick of Hardwick, 
Co. Derby. She predeceased him, which may 
explain why we hear so little about her, although 
she was the sister of the much married Elizabeth 


52 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


Hardwick, Countess of Shrewsbury, 4 Building 
Bess,’ the keeper, with her husband, for some 
time of Mary Queen of Scots. One mention we 
do find of her in a letter from Elizabeth—then 
Lady Cavendish—in 1552. She writes to her 
servant Francis Whitfield at Chatsworth, with 
directions about some payments, and orders 
him to 4 Make my syster Jane prevye of itt,’ 
and earlier in the letter she says, 4 1 here that 
my syster Jane cane not have thynges that ys 
needfoulle for hare to have amoungst you : yf 
ytt be trewe, you lacke a great of honeste as 
well as dyscrescyon to deny hare any thynge 
that she hathe a mynde to, beynge in case as 
she hathe bene. I wolde be lothe to have any 
stranger so yoused yn my howse, and then 
assure yourself I cane not lyke ytt, to have 
my Syster so yoused.’ The friendly relations 
between the families continued after the time 
of the sisters, for half a century later we hear 
of compromising Shrewsbury papers kept at 
Gunthwaite by their owner’s request, as is 
proved by a letter dated from Whitehall 4 this 
28th of June 1619,’ from the Lords of the 
Council to 4 our loving freinds Geo. Lassels and 
Fr. Cooke Esquires.’ The Lords are evidently 
both clerical and lay, as the first signature to 
this letter is 4 G. Cantuar.’ and the next 4 Hen. 



IN TUDOR DAYS 


53 


Southampton,’ while the eighth signs the aston¬ 
ishing name of 4 Julius Cesar ’ ! 1 The letter 
tells that certain evidences and writings re¬ 
maining in the castle of 4 Sheaffield ’ and manor 
of 4 Worsoppe 5 have been ordered to be sent 
to London, and that 4 one Swift, servant to the 
Lady Mary, Countess of Shrewsbury,’ having 
notice of these orders, 4 did secretly convey 
away greate number of these writings and 
evidences out of the Castle of Sheaffield and 
delivered the same to a sister of his, the wife 
of one Mr. Bosseville of Gunthwaite, willing her 
for the better conceyling thereof, to locke them 
in her own trunkes,’ where they were believed 
still to be, and the Lords directed their 4 loving 
friends ’ to proceed to the house of the afore¬ 
said Mr. Bosville, taking the help of any of His 
Majesty’s public officials if necessary, and to 
make diligent search for the papers, which, if 
found, were to be sealed up and sent forthwith 
to Shrewsbury House in Broad Street, 4 to the 
end that they may be viewed and disposed of 
as the King might desire.’ But, alas ! no more 
is ever heard of all this! The Mr. Swift 
mentioned was not really brother to Mrs. Bos¬ 
ville but brother-in-law; Mr. Swift, who was 

1 Since above was written, I learn that Sir Julius Caesar was a 
well-known judge. 


54 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

afterwards a knight, having married Elizabeth 
Greville, a daughter of Sir Edward Greville of 
Harold Park, Essex, whose sister, Margaret 
Greville, was the wife of the second Godfrey 
Bosville of Gunthwaite. 

The first Godfrey Bosville made his will on 
July 22, 1580, the day before his death. It 
contains so many interesting details that I 
follow Hunter’s example (South Yorkshire , 
vol. ii. page 347) and give the following extract 
from it. The testator declares that he makes 
his will 4 considering the great ambiguities, 
troubles, suits, traversies and questions that do 
daily arise and grow in last wills.’ He directs 
that he shall be buried in the church at Beigh- 
ton, without any pomp or outward pride of the 
world ; his debts to be paid and reparation 
made for injuries done by him. He gives to 
his son Francis two great carved bedsteads of 
wood at 4 Gonnildwhait,’ a goblet of silver gilt 
and cover, and all other 4 heirlooms, selings and 
stuff as hath been and is known for heirlooms 
at Gonnildthwaite and such as shall be set forth 
as heirlooms ’ (Room here surely for 4 ambigui¬ 
ties, troubles, suits, traversies and questions ’!); 
4 also bed and bedsteads at his Lodge of Ox¬ 
spring and tables and forms there, with all his 


IN TUDOR DAYS 


55 


harness, cross-bows, rack and artillery ’—they 
are to descend as heirlooms to the use of his 
heirs male. He next gives to his son the manor 
of Gunthwaite and the lease of the manor of 
Beighton, which he has of the demise of 
Gregory Fynes, Lord Dacre of the South. If 
his son die without issue male before the 
expiration of the lease, the remainder to his 
brothers Ralph and Henry. He gives to his 
executors for seven years his manors of Ox¬ 
spring, Peniston, Cawthorne, and Keresford, 
to pay debts and raise portions for his daugh¬ 
ters. He makes his brother Henry Bosville and 
his son Francis executors, and his brother Ralph 
Bosville and cousin Thomas Barnby super¬ 
visors. The supervisors were to have the order 
of his son Francis, which he is the bolder to 
appoint, because he knows full well that he 
holds no manner of lands of any person or 
persons by knight-service ; and he ends with 
entreating them to attend to the honest bring¬ 
ing up of this his only son in learning and other 
virtuous education. His inquisition was taken 
at Wakefield on October 5 following, before 
Francis Pover, escheator, when it was found 
that he died seized of :— 

A capital messuage called Gunthwaite Hall, 


56 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


alias Gummaldthwaite-hall, and tenement and 
mill there held by George Earl of Shrewsbury, 
as of his manor of Brierley, by knight-service 
and the rent of 3s. 

A capital messuage called Oxspring Hall held 
of the same. 

Tenements at Cawthorne, held of the 
same. 

Lands at Thurlston, held of Edward Savile, 
Esq. 

Lands at Barnsley, held of the Queen, as of 
her manor of Barnsley. 

Lands and tenements at Penistone, held of 
the Queen, as of the manor of East Greenwich. 

And that Francis is his son and heir and aged 
seventeen years and three months. 

His four daughters were :— 

Frances, married John Savile of Newhall, 
Esq. ; Mary, married Richard, son and heir of 
Henry Burdet of Denby, Esq. ; Dorothy, mar¬ 
ried John Lacey of Brierley, Esq. (a daughter 
of this Dorothy married John Wheatley of 
Woolley); and Elizabeth, married Will Copley 
of Sprotborough, Esq. 

So Francis succeeded to Gunthwaite (XVI.), 
and it was for him that Glover drew up the 
Pedigree before mentioned, in 1586. In the 


IN TUDOR DAYS 


57 


Memoirs we find mention of rents paid to this 
Francis in 1588. 

George Blunt, gent., paid two pairs of broad 
arrows with heads. 

James Bilcliffe paid annually a pair of 
gloves. 

Thomas Wordsworth, for Roughbanks, paid 
‘ a thwittle ’ (which I believe to be a knife). 

In 1572, to Godfrey, father of Francis, as 
lord of the manor of Oxspring, from John 
Waynwright of Wytwell Hall, in Hallam- 
shire (in the manor of Bolderston), 4 two grett 
brode arrows well hedyd and barbyd ordrly.’ 
He received also, as rent for a farm called 
Unshriven Bridge in Hunshelf, the yearly pay¬ 
ment of two broad-headed and feathered arrows, 
and two farms at Carlecoats in the parish of 
Peniston paid as rent, the one a right-hand 
and the other a left-hand glove ; while a farm 
at Brook House, in Langsett, paid yearly to 
him a snowball at midsummer and a red rose 
at Christmas. These rents, or some of them, 
are mentioned in Tenures of Lands and Customs 
of Manors , originally collected by Thomas 
Blount and W. C. Hazlitt (pages 44, 57, 138, 
169, and 237). It is no uncommon thing to 
find snow late in June in caverns and hollows 


58 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


upon the high moors, and roses in Yorkshire 
go on blooming well into December. The 
present writer has often found one or two thert, 
in sheltered spots of the Thorpe gardens ; also 
perhaps a preserved or pressed rose might have 
been accepted. We shall see that in the 
eighteenth century this red rose payment was 
paid at Martinmas, that is in the middle of 
November. 

Francis Bosville was dead before 1596. He 
married Dorothy, daughter of Alvery Copley of 
Batley ; she survived him, and married as her 
second husband Lionel Rolston, Esq., who 
lived many years at Gunthwaite. Francis and 
Dorothy had but one child, a daughter named 
Grace, who, born in 1585, died young. There 
is still at Thorpe the Deed of Settlement drawn 
up by Francis in the form of an indenture, 1 
dated January 8, 28 Elizabeth (1585), by which 
his wife Dorothy had the liferent of Gun- 
thwaite, which was left to his and Dorothy’s 
heirs 4 of his body ’ ; in default to Ralph 
Bosville of London and the heirs male of his 

1 An indenture is a deed drawn up in duplicate upon one sheet 
of parchment, the two copies being then divided by a jagged tear 
across the parchment. Each of the two consenting parties then 
has one copy which fits into the copy held by the other, by 
the serrated teeth-like edges fitting into the corresponding 
indentations. 


IN TUDOR DAYS 


59 


body; in default to Dame Isabel Savile, a 
sister of Dorothy’s, and after her death, to 
Grace Savile, her daughter, for life; after their 
decease, to Robert Bosville of London, gent., 
brother of Ralph, and the heirs male of his 
body ; in default to Henry Bosville of Brad- 
born, Esq., and the heirs male of his body ; 
in default to Thomas Bosville, son and heir 
apparent of Gervas Bosville of New Hall, Esq., 
and the heirs male of his body ; and finally, 
in default, to the right heirs of Francis Bosville, 
who died not long after making this 4 Settle¬ 
ment.’ 

At Thorpe there is an old paper inscribed 
4 Examination in the Spiritual Court between 
Richard Wortley and Thomas Bossville 1588,’ 
which evidently concerns questions made about 
Gunthwaite. This is probably the Thomas of 
the last 4 default ’ but one in the Settlement. 

The widow of Francis lived long at Gun¬ 
thwaite. Her second husband, Lionel Rolston, 
was a 4 Captain of foot in Ireland ’ and in 
other, foreign, service. At Gunthwaite he 
acted as a Justice of the Peace in the latter days 
of Queen Elizabeth. He survived Dorothy, 
and married as his second wife a daughter of 
Cressy of Birkin. 


60 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

On the death of Dorothy the estates of 
Francis Bosville descended to his cousin God¬ 
frey, the grandson of Francis’s uncle Ralph, 
and son of that Ralph Bosville who is described 
in the Settlement as 4 of London, gentleman.’ 

Note .—Another Bosville property in Kent was 
‘ The Little Mote, Eynsford.’ 

Margaretta, daughter and heir of Thomas Bosville 
of that place, married, on December 12, 1681, Sir 
Robert Marsham, fourth Baronet of Bushy Hall, 
Hertford. Their son Robert was the first 4 Baron of 
Romney,’ whose grandson was created Earl of 
Romney. This family, says Baverstoke, now repre¬ 
sents this branch of the Bosvilles of Kent. 


CHAPTER VII 


IN THE TIME OF THE COMMONWEALTH- 
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY 

(XVII.) This second Godfrey Bosville was 
destined to play a prominent part in the 
troubles of his time. But he must have had 
a share of business in Yorkshire before he pos¬ 
sessed his cousin’s estates, for though it is the 
name of the first Godfrey which is found on 
one of the earliest 4 Court barons 5 papers re¬ 
maining at Thorpe, a court held at Oxspring 
by Godfrey Bosville in the seventeenth year of 
Queen Elizabeth (1575), there are also Mid¬ 
hope Court Rolls in this second Godfrey’s name; 
and still later ones belonging to the third God¬ 
frey in 1696, and even to the fourth Godfrey 
in 1741 for Oxspring and Midhope, and in 1747 
for Oxspring. They appear to be simply lists of 
names and sums of money, but they are gener¬ 
ally headed as 4 held by Godfrey Bosville,’ and 
under that is written 4 The Homage to the 

Lord.’ Perhaps Godfrey acted as his cousin’s 

61 


62 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

agent. However that may be, he became 
Lord of Gunthwaite in 1619, for he is described 
on December 3 of 16 James i. as Godfrey Bos- 
ville of Gunthwaite, Esq., in an indenture to 
which Lionel Rolston was a party. He was 
then about twenty-three years of age. 

Owing to this second Godfrey’s mother 
having married her second husband, Fulke 
Greville of Thorpe Latimer in Lincolnshire, 
while her son was a child, he was brought up 
among the Grevilles, and when he became a 
man he connected himself still further with that 
family by marrying Margaret, daughter of Sir 
Edward Greville (uncle to his stepfather) by 
his wife Jane, daughter of John Lord Grey, 
brother of the Duke of Suffolk. His step¬ 
father’s cousin, another Fulke Greville, was 
created Lord Brooke, with remainder to God¬ 
frey’s half-brother. The influence of Lord 
Brooke and of his brother-in-law, Sir Arthur 
Hesilrigge, no doubt interested Godfrey in the 
assertion of popular rights. He fixed himself 
at Wroxall, in Warwickshire, with his wife, 
abandoning Gunthwaite as a residence, and he 
was returned as Member for the borough of 
Warwick to the famous Long Parliament in 
1640 and became one of the association for the 


TIME OF THE COMMONWEALTH 63 

defence of that county 4 against the plunder¬ 
ing thereof by Papists and other disaffected 
persons/ 1642. 

In a list of the names of Members of the 
House of Commons who advanced horse, money, 
and plate for the defence of Parliament in 
1642, we find that 4 Mr. Bose vile will either 
bring in one horse or an hundred pounds . 5 When 
civil war broke out he was named one of the 
Deputy Lieutenants for Warwickshire, June 28, 
1642 ; a Lieut.-Colonel, January 27, 1643 ; and 
Colonel of a Regiment of Foot, March 3 fol¬ 
lowing. In the autumn of 1642 he was at the 
defending of Warwick Castle against the King, 
and also in Lord Brooke’s successful action at 
Coventry. He was entrusted with the com¬ 
mand of a party who recovered the Speaker’s 
house at Besils-lee. But he seems to have 
kept in touch with Gunthwaite all this time. 
There are two letters of his at Thorpe and a 
third is printed by Hunter. This latter is the 
earlier (of the two to his agent) in date, and 
runs thus :— 

4 Honest John,— You will, before you re¬ 
ceive this letter, further understand the present 
state of affaires of this Kingdome, than I can 


64 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

now relate, and that I cannot bee without 
money to supplie extraordinary occasions. I 
pray therefore acquaint my tenants that I now 
expect them (as they value my respect) to pay 
in the rent without delay, wch. I would have 
you forthwith to pay over to my good friend 
Mr. Webster, who will take care to return it to 
me in my own time without fade. He hath oft 
been beforehand in disbursements and I desire 
now to have something in his hand aforehand. 
I know I can receive it from him with more 
safety than you can return it otherwise. 

c The Lord direct us in our loyalty to the 
King and care for the safety of the Kingdome. 
I have no more but this, that I am Yor very 
loving friend, 

4 Godfrey Bossevile. 

‘London, 30 May 1642.’ 

The next is still about money, and evidently 
his respect for his tenants has not received 
enough encouragement. It was written during 
his campaign with Lord Brooke. It, like the 
other, begins :— 

4 Honest John,— Truely I did well hope that 
all y e last rents had been pay’d in to you before 
this, I now doubt of it. 



TIME OF THE COMMONWEALTH 


65 


4 1 pray send mee a note of such as are in 
arreare and who made default att this rent day, 
for I propose that if we have any law in 
England, I will presently make Use of yt to 
gett my owne of them, for I now clearly see, 
they grossly abuse my respect to them. 

4 1 pray as my munie comes in unto you, pay 
it over to my good freind Mr. Webster.—I rest 
y r . very loving freind, 

4 Godfrey Bosville. 

(Dated) 4 Coventry, 28 No. 1642. 

(And addressed) 4 To his very lovinge friend 

John Shirt at Cawthorne. Del.’ 

There is still another similar letter at Thorpe 
from him, beginning 4 Honest Freind. 5 

John Shirt was one of those who held Peni- 
stone Church when it was garrisoned by the 
Parliament in 1643. The others in charge there 
were Captain Rich of Bullhouse; Captain Adam 
Eyre of Hazlehead, under Sir Francis Wortley 
of Wortley ; and Sir Thomas Wentworth of 
Bretton (see Captain Eyre’s Diary , published 
by the Surtees Society). So John, honest man, 
was not always able to go round peaceably 
collecting rents and distributing the landlord’s 
4 respect.’ 

E 


66 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


In December 1642 Godfrey was attending to 
his duty in Parliament, and was deputed by the 
House of Commons to wait on Lord Brooke to 
give him thanks for the excellent speech he had 
delivered in the House of Peers against an 
Accommodation. In 1643 he was named one 
of the Commissioners of the West Riding of 
Yorkshire to put in force the Act for the 
punishment of scandalous clergymen and 
others, and also for the speedy raising and 
levying of money. In 1648 he was named one 
of the High Court of Justice for the trial of 
the King, at which trial, however, he never 
sat; and in the next year (1649) he was one 
of the thirty-seven Treasurers at War. This 
reminds us of Sir Martin de Bosville, his 
forbear ! 

There is an interesting passage in the Memoirs 
of John Horne Tooke, by Alexander Stephens 
(1813), where, in vol. ii. page 309, we are told 
that c As he (Colonel Bosville) observed that 
Puritanism extended among the troops and 
praying came into fashion, he, like Sir Harry 
Vane, resolved to pray too. Perceiving that 
the Puritanical ministers began to possess great 
influence, he at length became a candidate for 
that office and, prevailing on his own battalion 


TIME OF THE COMMONWEALTH 67 

to elect him, he from that moment governed 
and taught his men in the double capacity 
of Colonel and Chaplain . 5 

Mr. Stephens here implies an hypocrisy of 
mind which might have been the mode of the 
time but does not strike one as characteristic of 
any of the Bosville men. Colonel Bosville was, 
however, like all his predecessors, most tena¬ 
cious of what he considered his rights, and we 
find him going to law with his neighbours at 
Denby about a right of way from Denby to the 
parish church of Penistone. A bill setting 
forth the complaints of the Denby inhabitants 
was exhibited in the Court of the Lord Presi¬ 
dent of the North, telling that this right of 
way had been enjoyed until c one Godfrey Bos¬ 
ville of Gunthwaite, gentleman, of his extort 
might and power , 5 stopped both this path and 
one leading to Thurlstone ; and praying for 
redress on the grounds that while they them¬ 
selves are poor people, their opponent is c a man 
of great maister-shippe and frendshipe . 5 We 
are not told whether this petition was granted, 
and one might fancy that had Colonel Bosville 
been brought up at Gunthwaite he would have 
been more in sympathy with his neighbours ; 
but as late as 1749 there was another petition 


68 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


of the same sort, when another Godfrey Bosville 
reigned at Gunthwaite, and this time counsel’s 
opinion was taken, and c John Spencer’s ’ 
written opinion was in favour of Mr. Bosville, 
and that the desired way was ‘ no road.’ 

The picture of Colonel Godfrey Bosville, 
which hangs at Thorpe, agrees well with the 
idea of the man suggested by his doings ; he 
has a most thoughtful, firm, almost sad face, 
with the long almond-shaped eyes which dis¬ 
tinguish the Bosville pictures extant and with 
their dark complexion. He is represented in 
armour; the picture is a three-quarter length 
full size, and gives the impression of a man very 
sturdy in build and about 5 feet 10 inches in 
height. 

Some of his accounts are still at Thorpe and 
are interesting. I copy the following :— 

For the Wor sh Captaine Boswel, his bill for your mixt 
codling coller cloth suit 13 of Decemb r 1648— 

fb g. d. 

for 2 y ds J of Cloth to a Suit at 25 s a yard 02 16 3 

for 2 y ds | of Scarlet coullor Taffatie to 
lion the doublet and face the pocckets 
and Lienens at 5 s 6 d a yard . . 00 16 3 

for 1 y d of peach Coller Taffatie to the 
Roufs on the Sleuf bands and to the 
gloufs and face the gloufs . . 00 06 0 


TIME OF THE COMMONWEALTH 69 



ft) s. 

d. 

for dimitie to lion the hose . 

00 05 

0 

for callicoo to the hose 

00 03 

0 

for 3 oz. of silver lace to the gloufs and 



sleuf-bands at 4 s 8 d an ounce . 

00 14 

0 

for Canvis and stiffening 

00 04 

0 

for poockets, hoocks and eyes 

00 02 

4 

for gallone and Lupe Lace . 

00 01 

6 

for 4 dozen | of brest buttons 

00 01 

6 

for drawing of the suit 

00 01 

4 

for 2 trumpoynts .... 

00 00 

8 

for 3 dozon of poynts and ribon to the 



hose ...... 

00 18 

0 

for 6 yards of read and mingled skie 



coullor Ribon and red ribento the hose 

00 03 

0 

for silk ...... 

00 02 

0 

for 3 y ds | of Scarlet coullor riben to bind 



the Lienens ..... 

00 01 

6 

for Making the suit and gloufs 

00 15 

0 

same is 

07 11 

7 

received in part 

02 05 

0 


Rest due 5 11 1. 


(The arithmetic seems odd.) 

On the back is :— 

Receved in foul of this bil the some of 5lb 11 s by 

me Receved. Andrew Varley. 

The worshipful Captain Bosville evidently 
dressed more after the fashion of a Cavalier 
than a Roundhead ! The suit, with its hose 
and gloves, its ruffles and scarlet-bound linings, 




70 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


its galloon (braid) and silver lace, its ribbons of 
mingled sky-blue and red, its scarlet lining to 
the doublet and peach colour at the wrists, 
sounds very smart indeed. Neither tailor nor 
customer seem to have been able to add up 
or subtract! and the lb mark for £ looks very 
quaint to modern eyes. 

It was not only Captain Bosville who had 
fine clothes. We get a glimpse of his daughter- 
in-law’s gowns, as a bill for that Mrs. Bosville’s 
dress has survived. This would be made at 
home by a tailor, as was then the fashion ; the 
materials all being supplied by the customer. 
This bill is headed, 4 Mrs. Bossevill hir bil ffeb 
20. 1654,’ and continues as follows (the £ mark 
here is right) :— 


Imp 0 for Stais for ye silke dress and wast 

£ 

s. 

d. 

coate ...... 

00 

04 

00 

for Silke and Galome .... 

00 

01 

06 

for lynings for the bodis and sieves 

00 

02 

03 

for bordering and binding . 

00 

02 

02 

for Colored Taffaty .... 

00 

03 

00 

for stiffenning for the Sleevs and Coffes 

00 

00 

06 

for making of ye sute 

00 

10 

00 

for silke and Galome .... 

00 

02 

03 

for sieve lynings .... 

00 

01 

06 

for 3 yards of Ribboning 

00 

01 

06 

for houkes and eye .... 

00 

00 

03 


TIME OF THE COMMONWEALTH 


71 


£ 

s. 

d. 

for making of ye Coat 

00 

08 

00 

for stais for ye blacke wastcoate . 

00 

03 

06 

for silke and Galome .... 

00 

00 

04 

for one yard of black calico 

00 

00 

04 

for linings for ye bodis and sieves 

00 

02 

03 

for steffinnings for ye sieves and coffes . 

00 

00 

08 

for making of yat sute 

00 

09 

00 

for silke for ye 3 mantells . 

00 

01 

04 

for lynings and galome for y e litell sieves 

00 

00 

08 

for making ye mantells and sieves 

00 

05 

00 

for 2 yards and one quarter of red lase . 

00 

18 

00 

for silke and galome for the peticoats . 

00 

02 

00 

for 2 yards of ffeurt Ribben [is this 




flowered ?] 

00 

00 

06 

for 2 pockets ..... 

00 

00 

06 

for 2 demmety wastcoates . 

00 

03 

04 

for 3 yards of Taffaty Ribben . 

00 

01 

06 


some is £4. 4. 4 


At the bottom of this bill is mysteriously 
added the following :— 

for 3 dozen of Candells . . . 0 14 0 

Can the tailor have had to work by night ? 
And on the back are various other entries which 
seem rather to suggest that they may be a note 
of the tailor’s board and of his expenses in 
coming to his work. Some of the items read 
amazingly to-day ; for instance :— 

for a shoulder of muton . . .024 

for a breast of veal . . . .026 



72 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


£ S. 

for a quarte of lam . . . .02 

for bread . . . . . .00 

for oranges and lemons . . .01 

for milk . . . . . .00 

for buter . . . . . .00 

for broth . . . . . .00 

for ale . . . . . .00 

for laces . . . . . .02 

for a comb . . . . .02 

for gloves . . . . . .01 

for thrid . . . . . .02 

for going by road . . . .01 

for a coach hir . . . . .01 

for ale and bread . . . .00 

for drink at morlack (?) . . . 0 0 


d. 

6 

4 

6 

1 

7 

3 
2 
0 
0 

4 

8 
0 
0 
2 
6 


The whole bill is emphatically receipted in 
the following words :— 


Feb. the 26th, 1654. 


Received then of William Bosseville' 
Esq r the sum of eleven pounds* 
four shillings in full of this bill of all 
deeds and amounts from the begin¬ 
ning of the world untill the day of 
the date hereof of Febry received 
by me 

John Gale 


£11. 4s. 


Colonel Godfrey Bosville died in 1658. By 
his wife, Margaret Greville, he had one son, 
William, and two daughters, Elizabeth, who 









TIME OF THE COMMONWEALTH 


73 


married Herbert Pelham, Esq., of Fewer, Co. 
Essex; and Mary, who married George James 
Sedascue, a Bohemian, an officer in the Parlia¬ 
ment Army. This George Sedascue, described 
as of Gunthwaite Hall, Esq., gave by will £20 
to the Master of Penistone Grammar School. 
This money lay for some time at interest, but 
was finally spent in part payment for the erec¬ 
tion of a dwelling-house for the Master. The 
memory of this benefactor is preserved by the 
following inscription over the schoolhouse 
door :— 

Georgius Sedascue, arm: 

XX £ in usam hujus scholae legavit 
quas Gulielmus Bossville, arm: 
aedibus hisce reaedificandis impendit. 

An 0 D ml 1717. 

At Thorpe there is a beautiful parchment roll 
consisting of maps of all the English counties, 
very finely engraved and coloured by hand. 
This is inscribed with the name of the third 
Godfrey Bosville 6 Armig: 5 and that it is c ex 
dono George Sedascue Armig: 30th August 
1678.’ 

(XVIII.) William Bosville of Gunthwaite, 
the only son of Colonel Godfrey Bosville and 
his successor in 1658, was aged twelve in 1632 ; 


74 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

he was an officer in the Parliament Army, and 
is named by Ludlow in his Memoirs as one of 
a hundred gentlemen belonging to the Inns of 
Court who with himself were formed volun¬ 
tarily into a body of horse under Sir Philip 
Stapleton, as guards to the Earl of Essex. 
William Bosville held the rank of Captain in 
the Parliament Army 1643, and was desperately 
wounded in the fight at Aylesford between Sir 
William Waller and Sir Ralph Hopton on 
March 30, 1644. He afterwards held the rank 
of Major, and finally of Colonel. He was em¬ 
ployed in several Commissions during the 
Commonwealth, as in that for selling the fee 
farm rents of the duchies of Lancaster and Corn¬ 
wall, and in 1656 for the sale of the forests of 
Sherwood, Needwood, Kingswood, and Enfield. 

After the Restoration he made the Declara¬ 
tion required on May 25, 1660, and received 
his pardon. Upon this his wife and he re¬ 
turned to Gunthwaite. 

At Thorpe there is a sheet of writing about 
Cromwell and some of his followers. It must 
be the work of a Loyalist, as he has nothing 
but abuse for every one he writes of. He calls 
Cromwell 4 a man made great by other men’s 
actions lathered on him,’ and goes on to say : 


TIME OF THE COMMONWEALTH 


75 


‘ At Marston Moor, though Sir Thomas Fairfax, 
Lieut.-General Middleton, Major-General Craw¬ 
ford deserved farre above him, yett Cromwell 
must be bellowed abroad the Saviour of the 
three kingdoms, the Great Deliverer: ’Tis 
truth,’ the paper goes on, 4 if Craford had not 
whispered in his ear he had delivered himself 
out of ye field in ye beginning of the day at 
Naisbee.’ After mentioning Wilson (Colonel in 
the Orange Regt.) as 4 a man that hath more 
money than wit or Valour, but he may serve,’ 
and Camfield, the paper last of all mentions 
4 Captain Hey Day Boswell, a fellow lately put 
out for caning Train-Band Souldiers, but it 
seems he must come to it and this Prick-Louse 
employed to begin the Work.’ In spite of all 
this abuse the writer adds: ‘All these I dare 
say will never be guilty of high Treason in 
raising a new Warr, nor except ye last, be angry 
to be kick’d or affronted in any manner.’ So 
we conclude that such aspersions might be 
written but probably left unsaid in the presence 
of 4 Captain Hey Day Boswell.’ No doubt 
William entered with enjoyment into schemes 
which his father had begun at Gunthwaite, for 
instance the new chapel at Denby, which owed 
ts building chiefly to the exertions of Colonel 


76 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

Godfrey Bosville. The then nearest church to 
Gunthwaite was at Penistone, and in the 
winter floods often made an attempt to reach 
that place of worship dangerous, though it is 
only three miles farther on from Denby to 
Penistone. A very zealous Puritan minister, 
Mr. Charles Broxholme, had been placed to 
serve Denby Chapel. He had been much 
patronised by the Greville relations of the Bos- 
villes, especially by Lady Brooke, wife of Robert 
Lord Brooke. A provision was made for this 
chapel partly by a fine out of the rectory of 
Seaton-Rosse, which fine gave £100 to be paid 
annually by Sir Edward Osborne of Kiveton 
(£50 to Gunthwaite and £50 to Denby). This 
fine, levied in 1647, was paid irregularly, and at 
last £1000 down was paid by the heirs of 
Edward Osborne 4 to be placed to the augmenta¬ 
tion of the living.’ The mysterious payments 
which have to be made by the present owner 
of Thorpe and Gunthwaite to Seaton Ross may 
be the repayment of this Commonwealth fine, 
or rather the interest of that half-share of the 
£1000. These payments were evidently noticed 
bv the third Lord Macdonald at Thorpe, as he 
puts down in some notes still in the house, 4 The 
payment half yearly of the Seaton Ross curate 


TIME OF THE COMMONWEALTH 


77 


was Feb. 24, 1740, £12, 10s., and May 22, 1748, 
the same 5 ; and that it has a connection with 
the old fine is borne out by the following letter 
at Thorpe to the third Godfrey Bosville, which 
is dated Thorpe Salvine, August 18, 1704, and 
is from the representative of the original person 
fined, Sir Edward Osborne :— 

4 Sr, — I understand by the Vicar of Pockling- 
ton that upon some discourse betwixt you and 
him ab* the Twenty-five Pounds a yeare which 
you pay to the Curate of Seaton-Rosse, you 
owned to him that your ffather indeed Received 
Five Hundred pounds, for which you pay the 
said 25. But, that rather than Charge y r 
Estate therewith, you would pay in the said 
Five Hundred pounds ; now if you continue to 
be of the same mind of Paying the five hundred 
Pounds rather than charge y r Estate with the 
s d yearly Payment, I am willing and ready to 
receive the said sum of 500 1 and to settle the 
25. Anned (sic) upon some other Family, but I 
desire I may speedily know yo r mind herein,— 
that the Church may not depend upon any 
Precarious Settlement.—I am S r Yo r Most 
humble Serv* Leeds. 5 

The 4 your ffather ’ referred to in this letter 





78 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

is William Bosville of Gunthwaite, in whose 
time the £500 payment for Denby and Gun- 
thwaite Chapels seems to have been arranged. 

William Bosville had presumably met his 
future wife when he was at the Inns of Court in 
London, for she was Mary Wilkinson, daughter 
and heir of Roger Wilkinson, citizen of London 
(but the possessor of a coat of arms), and step¬ 
daughter of Sir Isaac Pennington, Lord Mayor 
of London. In a letter, dated at Chesterfield 
on March 24, 1642, Mr. Webster—that friend of 
Colonel Godfrey Bosville to whom he told his 
Honest John Shirt to send his rents—writing 
to that very John Shirt, adds this postscript to 
his letter : Y oung Mr. Bossevile is married to 
the Lord Mayor of London’s wife’s daughter.’ 
One would like to know more of this London 
girl than the bill for some of her clothes ; she 
must have had rather a chequered existence, 
and perhaps did not enjoy very much being 
taken by her husband eighteen years after their 
marriage to live in so remote a spot as Gun- 
thwaite. However, they had six children, two 
sons and four daughters, to keep the old house 
alive. But they did not stay there for long, 
for whether it was dulness which killed the 
city lass or not, Mary died on June 10, 1661, 


TIME OF THE COMMONWEALTH 


79 


and was buried at Penistone ; and her husband 
did not long survive her, for he departed this 
life on April 3, 1662, and was buried beside his 
wife. In earlier days they had lived at Rich¬ 
mond in Surrey, as we gather from a licence 
granted by the Bishop of Winchester, allowing 
William, his wife, his family, and his guests to 
eat meat during Lent, dated March 2, 1660. 
Their children were :— 

1. Godfrey, to whom we shall later return. 

2. William Bosville of Heath, born 2 March 

1655, who died before his elder brother. 
His wife was Benedicta Fisher, widow 
of John Hudson, both of Bristol. She 
died in 1719. They had two sons, 
Henry and William, and a daughter, 
Susan, who died young. 

The four daughters were :— 

1. Mary, married at Penistone Nov. 15,1664, 

to Edward Bunny of Newland, Esq. 

2. Elizabeth, married, first, John Allot of 

Bentley, gent. ; second, Thomas Bow¬ 
den of Bowden, Esq., Co. Derby, buried 
at Emley January 7, 1706. 

3. Margaret, died unmarried after 1694. 

4. Priscilla, married, first, Jervas Armitage, 

gent.; second, Richard Hartley. 



CHAPTER VIII 


THROUGH RESTORATION TO REVOLUTION- 
SEVENTEENTH CENTURY ( continued ) 

(XIX.) Godfrey Bosville of Gunthwaite, 
Esq., well known in his time as Justice Bosville, 
the son of William and Mary (Wilkinson) Bos¬ 
ville, must have been born in 1654 . He was about 
seven years old when left an orphan in 1662 . 
This third Godfrey’s rents were paid during his 
minority to George Barnby, a devoted friend 
of his family, and to George Sedascue, his uncle 
by marriage. There is a paper at Thorpe, drawn 
up later on by Justice Bosville himself, contain¬ 
ing a full list of all these rents ; he calls it, ‘ A 
Copy of a Rentall made since my ffather’s death 
about ye year 1663 .’ The list includes rents 


for Gunthwaite .... 

for Calthorn (Cawthorne) 

for Oxspring ..... 

for copyholds in Penistone 

for Chief rents in Oxspring Rough- 

birchworth, Thurlston and Ellswhere 
80 


£310 15 9 

127 13 0 

179 3 6 

2 6 10 

14 6 









COLONEL GODFREY BOSVILLE OF GUNTH WAITE, M.P. 
(From the picture at Thorpe) 



RESTORATION AND REVOLUTION 81 


and ends : 

The summ of all y e rents, both of my 
Grandfather and father besides 
Chief rents and copyhold, is . . £620 11 4 

When he came of age he settled at Gunthwaite 
and busied himself in improving the place, both 
by building and also by the purchase of lands 
at Ingbirchworth and Micklethwaite fields to 
enlarge the Park. He also bought the manor 
of Midhope and the manor of New Hall, the 
ancient inheritance of his family but which had 
passed from them on the extinction of the 
elder branch, which occurred on the death of 
Thomas Bosville of New Hall, whose will was 
proved on December 12, 1639. The lands were 
then sold and were for some time possessed by 
the Wortleys, but by 1713 they were the pro¬ 
perty of William Marsden, who sold them in 
that year 4 to Godfrey Bosville of Gunthwaite 
Esq. for £2,400.’ 

It must have been this third Godfrey Bos¬ 
ville who, on May 16, 1678, signs a paper, still 
at Thorpe, which is an account of the 4 Rental 
of Lands belonging to the Free Grammar School 
at Penistone made by the feoffees.’ This rental 
in all amounted to £18, 12s. yearly. Another 
similar paper, dated May 8 of the same year, 

F 


82 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


gives a list of the tenants occupying the above- 
mentioned lands or houses, in all, twenty-six 
persons. Some of the rents are classified as 
4 Improveable.’ The highest of these rents is 
19s. 8d., and is paid by 4 M rls ’ (evidently 
the earliest contraction of Mistress) Shaw 
for one dwelling-house, yard, and garden, 
and certain parcels of land in Denby ; also 
Stoneyhouse, barn and croft in Penistone. 
(In these papers there is always an 4 e ’ at the 
end of Penistone, which we do not find 
earlier.) 

This Godfrey Bosville, like his predecessors, 
held Court Barons, and at Thorpe there is a 
parchment 4 admitting Francis Burdett and 
Rachel his wife ’ at one of these courts. In 
1705 he served as High Sheriff for his county, 
and there are some pages inscribed 4 Lammas 
Assizes 1705,’ with his name following this, 
bound up at Thorpe in two old pieces of parch¬ 
ment cut from a deed temp. Charles n. Before 
Godfrey’s name there is a word which looks 
like 4 scrip 1 ,’ so these may be the notes he took 
during these assizes, but the crabbed old 
writing is too hard to make out. This Godfrey 
also signs a deed of gift of lands to Francis 
Oiley (such an odd name !), Vicar and School - 


RESTORATION AND REVOLUTION 83 


master at Penistone, 14 James i. But we are 
anticipating events. 

On October 13, 1681, Godfrey Bosville and 
Bridget, daughter of Sir John Hotham of Scor- 
brough, Baronet, and his wife, the sister and 
heir of Sapcote, Viscount Beaumont, were mar¬ 
ried in the old Scorbrough Church. This 
church has since been pulled down and a new 
edifice erected. It still contains a beautiful 
fourteenth-century tomb to a young Canon 
Henry Middleton. The marriage of Godfrey 
and Bridget is commemorated in a stained-glass 
window in Penistone Church, which shows the 
arms of both families and the date, 1681. 

We have always believed that this Bridget 
Hotham brought to the Bosvilles the first land 
ever owned by them in the East Riding; this 
consists of a moiety of the farms of Eastburn 
Warren and Battlebourn, which farms are still 
jointly held by the present Lord Hotham and 
the present owner of Gunthwaite and Thorpe. 
The family of the present tenant of these farms, 
whose name is Jordan, have held them now for 
three generations. They built the dwelling- 
house at Eastburn and have made a beautiful 
garden. Through the place runs the famous 
1 Driffield trout steam,’ which is cared for and 


84 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

fished by a very celebrated club, to which, of 
course, the owners belong ex officio. There are 
papers at Thorpe which show that the rents 
and expenses of these farms have always been 
jointly shared by the two owners. The agent, 
Wm. Wight,’ lived at Scorbrough, where the 
Hothams no longer dwelt, having built the 
large Hall at Dalton and gone to live there 
after the destructive fire at Scorbrough House 
in the eighteenth century. On Nov. 23, 1756, 
Mr. Wight writes from Scorbrough : 4 I have 
carefully examined all the Eastburn documents 
and it appears to me that you [he is writing to 
the fourth Godfrey] have paid £1268= 03= 00J 
since the moiety of the estate was bequeathed.’ 
In this letter he mentions that 4 Sir Charles 
Hotham returned from his travels 3 months 
agoe.’ Also there is a bill at Thorpe, paid by 
Sir C. Hotham and the fourth Godfrey Bosville 
in 1758, for 4 a new pailing ’ (fencing) at East- 
burn and Southburn ; this whole bill is for 
£78, 17s. 3d., and each of the two owners gives 
£30, 8s. 7^d. There are also—to finish about 
this bit of property—receipts for Rotsea rents 
with Eastburn and Battlebourn in 1759 ; and 
in 1742, 1746, 1747, and 1748, when the tenant 
of Eastburn, etc., was Wm, Boyes. The 




RESTORATION AND REVOLUTION 85 


original lease to Wm. Boyes is at Thorpe and 
is signed by (Lady) Gertrude Hotham, Beau¬ 
mont Hotham, James Gee, and Godfrey Bos- 
ville, in January 13 George n. At Thorpe, too, 
is another lease of Eastburn Warren, in 1773, 
and one in 1843 ; Francis Best, who says he is 
suffering from paralysis, sends 6 Mr. Boyes’ 
half-year’s Interest Money.’ 

Before leaving Eastburn, etc., it must be 
recorded that in a List of Justices of the Peace 
for 1771, still at Thorpe, the name of William 
Bosville of Eastburn is found. This must be 
he who was finally the last male in the line of 
Bosville of Gunthwaite, and suggests that he 
had a house at Eastburn before his parents 
inherited Thorpe. 

Godfrey and Bridget (Hotham) Bosville 
seem to have made their home entirely at Gun¬ 
thwaite, and they occupied themselves partly 
in improving the place. It was they who added 
the new piece of the stables, who built the 
summer-house in the garden, and who planned 
to replace the old Hall itself with a new build¬ 
ing. The plans for this proposed new Hall at 
Gunthwaite are all still at Thorpe, and are 
dated 1690. Perhaps the unsettled times and 
the disappointing fact that no children came 


86 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

to bless their marriage combined to make 
Godfrey and Bridget give up the idea of a new 
home in the old place. This seems a pity, as 
one looks over the fascinating plans and draw¬ 
ings of the proposed Hall, which show a very 
dignified, well-proportioned, and pleasing Queen 
Anne house. The front has a centre with two 
not very prominent wings, between which 
extends a portico supported by graceful Ionic 
columns in pairs, along the top of which a pretty 
balustrade edges a balcony which extends across 
the windows of the first floor centre. The bal¬ 
cony serves to shelter the front door, which is 
at the top of seven steps inside the portico. 
These steps are necessary, for the house has an 
under-storey partly below the ground level. 
The top of the house has a bold Doric frieze 
and cornice, and the roof is high with steep 
gables over the wings, and the chimneys are 
arranged as graceful arches with frieze and cor¬ 
nice, a larger stack in the centre and two 
slighter but equally tall ones over the wings. 
The plans show on the top storey a long gallery 
running the whole length of one side of the 
house; this would be the c prospect room,’ 
where the daintily clad ladies of that date 
could admire the view while taking exercise, 


RESTORATION AND REVOLUTION 87 


when the country ways were too muddy for 
them. The other half of this storey has rooms 
along it. The gallery is wide and at either end 
has the extra breadth and the windows of the 
two wings under the gables. There are two 
staircases, one at each side of the house, in 
the wing parts, with a passage on each floor 
connecting these stairs. Charming, well-pro¬ 
portioned rooms are shown on the two middle 
floors, and in the basement enormous cellars— 
needed no doubt in those days—besides a good 
kitchen, pantry, and 4 still house.’ The build¬ 
ing, judging from a 4 Scale of Feete,’ seems to 
measure about 55 feet by 45 feet, so the house 
is quite small, but so admirably proportioned 
that it gives the idea of much larger size. 
These plans are initialed 4 FR. 5 

Godfrey seems always to have been known as 
Justice Bosville. There is a paper at Thorpe 
about some dispute between him, 4 Mosley ’ and 
others as to some legacy. The paper is labelled 
4 Case,’ and tells all about this, but is difficult 
to decipher. However, it is interesting, as at 
the end is what must be a counsel’s opinion, 
as it begins, 4 1 am of opinion ’ ; this is signed 
4 D. Ryder,’ and dated 1708. 

The happy home life at Gunthwaite was 




88 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

several times disturbed by war and rumours of 
war, as some letters at Thorpe still show ; for 
instance, those to Bridget from her mother’s 
brother, Colonel John Beaumont, who seems to 
have adored his 4 dear Neice.’ From London, 
on July 9, 1685, he writes to her husband :— 

4 Sr,— I got to London the Wednesday after 
I parted from yu. I was welcomed with the 
news of Monmouth’s party being absolutely 
routed and since I came to towne its seconded 
with the taking of those 2 Rebels Monmouth 
and Gray who was both taken by the Militia 
horse under the command of my L d Lumley 
and Sir William Portman within half a mile of 
one another upon the edge of new forrest and 
both will be brought up to this towne by Sunday 
night to receive the rewarde of Traytors ; our 
army consisted not of half the number of them, 
they being 7000 foot and 1200 Horse. 2000 of 
the enemy are killed, our loss but inconsider¬ 
able, one Capt: wounded, 4 L ts killed and 9 
Ensigns and near Twenty or thirty wounded 
men, not 60 killed, the enemy totally routed, 
so that we hope we shall have no further dis¬ 
turbance of this nature, but that we may live 
in peace for the future, present my affectionate 


RESTORATION AND REVOLUTION 89 


searvis to my dear Neice.—I am your ffaithful 
Serv*, John Beaumont . 5 

This letter is franked ‘ John Beaumont , 5 and 
has an interesting address on the back of the 
double sheet:— 

6 This to Godfrey Boseville at his 
house in Gunthwaite to be left with 
Mr. Tobias Sils at his house in Wake¬ 
field and to be sent forward with 
speed. Wakefield Bag. 

4 ffrank John Beaumont . 5 

It is painful to remember how unlike a king’s 
was the behaviour of James ii. to Monmouth. 
He had listened to all his nephew’s entreaties 
only to refuse them. Monmouth was equally 
unlike a prince or any sort of Stuart in the 
grovelling nature of these entreaties, which 
shamed him so and yet availed him nothing. 
He was executed in due course (on July 15). 
At Thorpe there is a little portrait, believed to 
be by Lely, painted on panel, of Henrietta, Lady 
Wentworth, the love of Monmouth, who died of 
grief a few months after his execution. He was 
much adored by many, and his wife, Anna, 
Duchess of Buccleuch, to whom Charles ii. had 
married him in 1663, never ceased to mourn 



90 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

him, though he had shown her but little affec¬ 
tion. To mark her grief at his beheading, she 
cut off the heads of all the trees on the estate 
where she lived (Moor Park, Herts). 1 

Poor Colonel Beaumont’s hope that after the 
suppression of Monmouth’s Rebellion there 
would be no further disturbance could not be 
fulfilled under such a rule as that of James n., 
and the next letter at Thorpe shows what had 
happened to him by September 25, 1688 :— 

‘ Dear Neice ’ (he writes), ‘ Of late I have 
been so roling about and have had such changes 
in my fortune, as I was unwilling to acquaint 
you with, least your kindness to me should give 
you an unnecessary trouble, it is true as yu 
have heard, I have lost my comand and place, 
but neither Honour nor a good Conscience, 
though I have not left so much as to live 
splendidly, yet I hope enough to be independ¬ 
ant and contented, the general distraction all 
the Nation is in with the Alarum of the Dutch 
invading us, makes it difficult for me to take 
any measures how I shall dispose of my Selfe, 
being desirous to Se the Nation settled before 

1 However, after three years of widowhood, she married secretly 
Charles, third Lord Cornwallis. 



RESTORATION AND REVOLUTION 91 


I betake my Selfe to that sorte of life I propose 
w h is Privacy. I have freed my Selfe of all my 
incumbrances, dismissed my servants, sold my 
Goods, one Servant and my Selfe is all my 
family in a private lodging ; and I doe not 
dought but I shall find more content than ever 
I have experienced in my best condition, I have 
lost a thousand pound a yeare income within 
this sixteen months, doe not bemoane me for 
I esteem my Selfe happier than ever, I thank 
God my mind is equall to my fortune, and he 
that hath enough can never want, I thank God 
[you] that hath been my chiefest concern, hath 
a good Husband and plentifull fortune and that 
is satisfaction enough to me, I have not been 
well this 6 months but my distemper is in my 
lims not Harte, so soon as this Storme that 
threatens is bloune over (if I live) I will [at] 
once if able make a journey to see you, the 
God of Heaven presearve you, the first North 
East wind we expect the Dutch will land but I 
hope the Business will be soon decided, and we 
may see Happy Dayes, Make much of your 
Good Husband, praise God and presarve your 
Religion and recken me to be as long as I live 
Your affectionate Unckle and faithfull servant, 

c John Beaumont.’ 


92 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

This leaves a sad impression, but in the next 
of Colonel Beaumont’s letters at Thorpe, dated 
‘ June ye 15th, 89,’ we hear a different story. 
‘ I have been in a Hurry of Business,’ he says, 
and in spite of ‘ very imperfect health ’ he is 
‘ now just moving towards my Regiment, which 
I hope to meet at Milford Haven and so to goe 
for Ireland.’ He adds : ‘ I am in despaire of 
seeing my Deare Neice to bid her farewell; if I 
live to return I will see her with joy, if not, she 
shall have a testimony of the true effection I 
have ever had for her. I pray God to bless you 
Both togather. . . .’ 

Though he went to Ireland, it is doubtful 
whether Colonel Beaumont was at the Battle of 
the Boyne, fought on July 1,1690, when William 
in. finally defeated James n., for we find him 
back in London by August, on the 16th of which 
month he writes from there :— 

‘ Deare Neice, —You will wonder to find a 
letter dated from this place, but of the 3 Regi¬ 
ments that the King [William in.] sent out of 
Ireland, mine was one of them, but before I 
left that Kingdome all things tended to a happy 
reducement and I hope the next news we have 
from thence it will be that it’s perfected, Never 
since Caesar any Prince hath had the like sue- 


RESTORATION AND REVOLUTION 93 


cess, nor any prince ventured more in person 
than ours hath done, I hope we shall have him 
retourne speedyly crowned with Laurell to us 
and that Popery will never take root again 
amongst us. 

4 Never Army ’ (he continues) 4 hath suffered 
more fatigue in so little a time as ours. I thank 
God I have had my health better than I could 
have hoped. Bread and water (and that but 
ill) hath been our food for some dayes, and the 
bare Ground our Beds, a Soldjer’s life is a life 
of a prince, but a Beggar would not live it, but 
God be thanked, all our sufferings are well 
recovered in the prospect to be delivered from 
Popish Bondage.’ 

In November he writes again, full of grati¬ 
tude for his safe return from Ireland, and 
reiterating his hope of shortly retiring into 
4 Privacy.’ He tells his niece of a terrible 
disaster, writing : 4 1 presume you have heard 
of a 3 rate ship that was blowne up in Cork 
Harbour, it was the Ship I went over in, the 
Captain my particular ffriend, with whom I 
had left aboard in money and Goods to the 
Vallew of £700, wh. with him Selfe and 420 
brave seamen was all blowne up or sunk.’ 


94 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


In Colonel Beaumont’s last letter (at Thorpe) 
to his niece one gathers that he has found his 
longed-for 4 Privacy,’ for the letter is dated, 
on March 12, 172f, 4 at my house in frith street 
near So Hoe Square,’ and in it he says : 4 1 dare 
assure you I have a wife so much to my Humour 
as you may promise Your Selfe all the respect 
and friendship in the World from her, as an 
earnest she desires me to present you and your 
Husband with her Humble Searvis.’ 

Two other letters, which illuminate the feel¬ 
ings of contemporaries as to the coming of 
Dutch William, are also at Thorpe. These are 
written to ‘Justice Bosville,’ and are from a 
neighbour, 4 S. Wortley,’ and both are written 
from Wortley and sent to Gunthwaite by 
hand. 

The first is dated November 9, 1688, and is 
as follows :— 

4 Sr, —Having received very considerable 
news last night, I thought you and Mrs. Boswill 
would be willing to share it. 

4 I had from very good hands that the Prince 
of Orange landed at Dartmouth, within twelve 
miles of Exeter, in Devonshire—It is said the 
fleet that carried him thither was a very great 




RESTORATION AND REVOLUTION 95 

one ; that he brought many land soldiers with 
him. 

6 Pray God send us soon rid of ill guests and 
that we may enjoy quietnesse again.—I am 
S r Your humble servant 

‘ S. WORTLEY.’ 

The second letter, dated November 18, 
1688, and evidently written in haste, runs as 
follows :— 

c Sr,— I cannot possibly waite on you upon 
Tuesday, I know you will excuse me when I 
tell you the occasion. 

4 1 had news this night that 8 of the King’s 
Regim ts were gone over to ye Prince of O. and 
am summoned to be at York on Tuesday next, 

4 pray come as soon as yu can possibly 
thither it is very necessary that all Gentlemen 
should be there to consider what is best to be 
done at this juncture.—I am Y r most obliged 
humble Servant 

4 S. Wortley.’ 

4 1 and all with me present you their service 
to y r Lady Sister and Selfe.’ 

No doubt this news was pleasing to the 
grandson of the Member, famous in the family, 
of the Long Parliament, and that the Hotham 




96 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


wife sympathised we know by her uncle’s 
letters. Indeed, Justice Bosville and his wife 
settled down happily under the new govern¬ 
ment, and, as before said, Mr. Bosville was 
High Sheriff in 1705 ; and Hunter describes 
him as having passed 4 a busy and useful life.’ 
He died, aged only fifty-eight, on June 18, 
1714, and was buried beside his wife, who had 
predeceased him in December 1708, in his 
parish church at Penistone, where two marble 
monuments in the chancel commemorate them. 



GODFREY BOSVILLE AND DIANA WENTWORTH WITH HER FAMILY AT BRETTON 












CHAPTER IX 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 

Justice Bosyille was succeeded at Gun- 
thwaite by his nephew William (XX.), the 
second son of his brother William and Bene- 
dicta (Fisher), their elder son Henry having 
died before his uncle. This Henry, called 4 of 
Kensington 5 in the Pedigree, married a daugh¬ 
ter of 4 Captain Richardson of the Powder Mills 
on Hounslow Heath, 5 but apparently they had 
no children. 

William, having been born the younger son 
of a younger son, 4 was intended for merchan¬ 
dise/ which sounds as if he were to be sold 
into slavery, and perhaps 4 merchandise 5 felt 
like that to him, for he discovered, when 
4 placed with Mr. Briggs, a merchant of Liver¬ 
pool, 5 that he greatly disliked his occupation. 
So his Uncle Godfrey bought him a commission 
in Lord Shannon’s Marines in 1709, and he 
presumably got on well as a soldier, for we 
find him later a captain in Colonel Stanhope’s 

G 


98 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


Regiment of Foot. There are letters at Thorpe 
from William to his Uncle Godfrey full of grati¬ 
tude to him for being so ready to pay for his 
commission, and also some correspondence 
about a commission between Godfrey and 
E. Burgess, dated 1710. But William seems 
to have left the Army when in 1714 he suc¬ 
ceeded his uncle in his estates. These he found 
encumbered for the moment by his predeces¬ 
sor’s land purchases, which, however, were in 
the end of great value to the family. William 
therefore sold Rodmore, also a share in the 
Aire and Calder Canal, and having, says Hunter, 
succeeded in his great suit respecting the right 
of presentation to the church of Penistone, he 
died at Gunthwaite in 1724, aged only forty-two. 
In 1722 he had made out a complete 4 Rentall 
of Captain Bosville’s estate for Martinmas 
1722.’ This is printed in Appendix II. p. 241. 

Apparently this Captain Bosville was also 
known, like his uncle, by the name of Justice 
Bosville, for Thoresby has this entry in his 
Diary :— 

‘June 19, 1724.—At Mr. Boulter’s, Mr. 
Bennet’s and Mr. Bosville’s; heard of the 
sudden death of his kinsman, Justice Bosville 
of Gunthwaite, of four hours’ sickness.’ 




• EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 99 


The c Mr. Bosville 5 must have been one of 
the Kent family. 

William’s wife was Bridget, daughter of John 
Wheatley of Royston, gentleman, a younger son 
of John Wheatley of Wolley. (Actually not an 
heiress!) After his death she married, in 
Midhope Chapel, September 29, 1729, Hugh 
Bosville of Gray’s Inn, Esq., a younger son of 
Thomas Bosville of Braithwell. By this second 
marriage she had a daughter, Mary Bosville, 
who afterwards married Thomas Place of Green 
Hammerton, Esq. 

The only surviving son of Captain William 
Bosville and his wife Bridget (Wheatley) now 
inherited Gunthwaite. (XXI.) He was Godfrey 
Bosville, the fourth of that name. Evidently his 
father had named him after his uncle, for whom 
he felt such gratitude. 

The fourth Godfrey Bosville was born in 
1717, and baptized in Denby Chapel, and was 
only seven years old when his father died so 
suddenly. As the author of the Memoirs, he 
is already an old friend. His life saw many 
changes, and during it the family increased 
greatly in prosperity and possessions. During 
his minority his estates were managed, as he 
tells us himself, c very honestly by two non- 


100 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


jurors and a Roman Catholic,’ to whose care 
he had been committed by his father. These 
were: Mr. Hodgson, who was steward to the 
Earl of Cardigan, under whose administration 
(says Hunter) of the Earl’s affairs in Yorkshire 
Howley Hall was destroyed; Mr. Matthewman ; 
and Mr. Blackburn, who was afterwards steward 
to the Duke of Norfolk. All encumbrances had 
been cleared from the property and the estate 
of Broad Oak, in Gunthwaite, bought, in 1720, 
before he succeeded. He himself in 1748 added 
the estate of Thurlstone, called Shepherd’s 
Castle, to the family acres. In 1762 he suc¬ 
ceeded to Biana, a house and estate in Stafford¬ 
shire, by the will of Charles Bosville of that 
place, a descendant of a younger son of Ralph 
Bosville, Kt., Clerk of the Court of Wards ; and 
eleven years later this fourth Godfrey Bosville 
also succeeded to the house and estate of Thorpe 
Hall in the East Riding, by the bequest of 
Thomas Hassell, Esq., the husband of an aunt 
of Mrs. Bosville, both these ladies having been 
born Wentworths of Bretton. 

As regards Biana, this property, according 
to some rough notes written by the third Lord 
Macdonald and preserved at Thorpe, was first 
owned by Sir Robert Bosville, who was uncle 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 101 


to Colonel Bosville of Cromwellian fame. This 
Sir Robert was afterwards of Eynsford in 
Kent. 

Biana is in the parish of Eccleshall, and the 
Church Registers contain a good many Bosville 
entries, beginning in 1651 and ending in 1762, 
when Mr. Charles Bosville’s burial is recorded. 

Upon a long, narrow roll of parchment 
at Thorpe is written out: c A true and perfect 
Inventary of all and singular the Goods, 
Chattells and Creditts of Robert Bos vile, late 
of Biana in the Co. of Stafford, Esq.’ It is not 
dated, but has a paper bearing Queen Anne’s 
cipher and crown attached to it. Robert was 
probably the father of Charles. This inventory 
begins by putting down Robert’s 4 wearing 
apparell ’ and 4 money in Pockett,’ which come 
to £20. Quite a lot of furniture is mentioned, 
of which three tables and a screen are valued 
at £2 ; two looking-glasses and four 4 glasses 
frontes ’ at £8 ; a picture at £12 ; 4 Clock and 
the rest of the furniture ’ at £3, 10s. All these 
in the parlour. The hall furniture is all grouped 
together and valued at £4, but the kitchen 
brass and pewter is worth £10, while its 4 Jack- 
grate and rest of the furniture ’ is put down at 
£2, the same sum being specified for the glass 


102 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

in the pantry. But the 4 Sellar ’ contains 
‘ Beare and Ale 5 value £16. 

The 4 Parlour Chamber,’ i.e. best bedroom, 
was very smart. It contained a bed and furni¬ 
ture value £10 ; 4 Glasses frontes and a Dressing 
Box,’ £2 ; 4 Chaires, Tables and Standes ’ worth 
£2, 5s., and a 4 great Chaire, Skreen and rest 
of the furniture ’ value £6. The other rooms 
are the hall chamber, the chamber next the 
parlour chamber, the 4 Staire Head Chamber,’ 
which contains 4 Clok,’ the kitchen chamber, 
and the 4 Garretts.’ 

The 4 Nappery ’ (linen) in the house was 
valued at £30, and the 4 Clossett ’ contained 
furniture value £3, and silver plate worth 
£44, 10s. 

The Brew House had two coppers and a 
mill, besides furniture, the whole put down 
at £8. 

The 4 Cattle,’ including three saddle horses, 
are valued at £8; nine 4 cowes ’ at £22, 10s.; 
two oxen at £9 ; three heifers at £4, 10s.; also 
4 three storkes and six calves,’ ten ewes, two 
lambs and swine, the whole worth £51. 4 A 

Chariott and a pair of Horses ’ are also on the 
list, value £40 ; so are 4 things out of sight and 
forgott,’ £6, 10s., which seems a large sum in 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 103 


proportion. The whole value reaches the 
amount of £413, 5s, and is attested— 


4 By us John Cramner 

John Partington 


Prizers. 5 


As the roll of parchment upon which this list 
of homely human possessions is inscribed curls 
up again, one feels that a vivid peep into a 
comfortable, secure home of long ago has been 
vouchsafed, and a regret lingers that Godfrey 
Bosville, only ten years later, sold the little 
inheritance. But he seems to have had mort¬ 
gages on other lands, which no doubt the money 
for Biana helped to pay off. No books are 
mentioned in the list, but at Thorpe there are 
still a few volumes with 4 Biana 5 written on 
the flyleaf. 

Mr. Charles Bosville also owned Ulverstone 
Abbey in Leicestershire, which Hunter tells us 
was left to Mr. Thomas Bosville 4 of London, 5 
one of the Braithwell branch of the family and 
father to William Parkin Bosville. (See the 
Braithwell Pedigree in Appendix, pp. 239-240.) 

A note left by the third Lord Macdonald tells 
us that when his grandfather, the fourth God¬ 
frey Bosville, sold Biana, it fetched £16,613,15s. 

Godfrey Bosville was also placed heir to the 



104 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

estate of Bradbourn in Kent, by Henry Bos- 
ville, a man he had never seen. But he had 
received a letter from him, for it is still at 
Thorpe. It is dated from 4 Bradbourne near 
Sevenoke, March 30, 1760, 5 and gives an account 
of the first Ralph Bosville 4 of your family,’ 
who came from Yorkshire to Kent, and was 
Chief Clerk of the Court of Wards in the second 
year of Queen Elizabeth, and tells that when 
Ralph’s grandson sold many of his lands it was 
the occasion of his writings being dispersed. 
No doubt these were family records. 

This fourth Godfrey, in the oft-quoted 
Memoirs, remarks how little people value old 
deeds until taught to understand them. He 
must have sighed over Henry’s information as 
to 4 writings.’ He himself was evidently a man 
highly cultivated and even polished, and at 
his house in London he entertained many of 
the wits and wiseacres of the day. He wrote 
verses, some of which Hunter has thought worth 
quoting (in his South Yorkshire , vol. ii. page 
198). This poem is called 4 The Moors,’ and 
shows the love of that day for dragging in every 
possible classical allusion while professing to 
write in admiration of Nature ; but the lines 
run pleasantly, and show that Godfrey loved 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 105 


his home scenery ; for instance, in talking of 

the landscape there which greets a traveller’s 

view, he says :— 

A cultivated vale his eye shall bless, 

Midhope, a garden in a wilderness ! 

And further on :— 

How pleasing to the eye the meadows green, 

The rural features and the sylvan scene; 

The frequent cottages dispers’d around 
The rising hills that villages have crown’d; 

Here single oaks with mighty branches spread 
Invite the cattle to the cooling shade. 

(This last rhyming end is not his best!) 

The fourth Godfrey appears to have kept 
hounds. There are various references to these 
scattered about the old papers. 4 Robin the 
huntsman ’ says he hears 4 they have worried 
100 sheep since Christmas, and that Echo is at 
last hanged.’ And there are solemn papers 
about trespass and the right to hunt hares ; 
a Thomas Roebuck, convicted of hunting one, 
promises under his seal and signature, which are 
duly witnessed, never to do so again ! 

This fourth Godfrey, too, it was who restored 
the chapel at Midhope ; it is built of roughly 
indented stones, and has a small turret for a 
bell at the west end. The chapel and also a 



106 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


well in the corner of the yard are dedicated 
to St. Janies. In former days the clergyman 
who officiated there used to say in his prayer 
before the sermon, c But especially let us pray 
for Godfrey Bosville, Esq., and his good lady. 5 
In 1657 the third Godfrey appointed to this 
chapel Nathaniel Shirt, M.A., one of the Shirts 
of Cawthorne, and a relation of the John Shirt 
of Cromwell’s time who helped to defend Peni- 
stone Church in 1643, and no doubt also of 
John Shirt, Colonel Godfrey Bosville’s agent. 
The living of Midhope was a donative, and 
belonged to the Bosvilles; but when Sir Alex¬ 
ander Macdonald of the Isles gave the living 
of Penistone to the diocese of Wakefield, 
Midhope was added to Penistone. 

The fourth Godfrey Bosville’s wife was Diana, 
eldest daughter of Sir William Wentworth, 
Baronet, of West Bretton, and sister of Sir 
Thomas Blackett, Baronet, who took his 
mother’s name on succeeding to her Northum¬ 
brian property, but who lived on his Went¬ 
worth estate of West Bretton. Diana was a 
worthy mate, in mind as well as in other ways, 
for Godfrey, as may be seen from a volume 
which she has left at Thorpe, where it is care¬ 
fully preserved, and which is an old-fashioned 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 107 


parchment book filled with writings. These 
are in turn interesting, amusing, and historical 
as regards passing events. Also, in the fashion 
of her day, they sometimes show what seems 
to us a coarse humour. A delightful paper 
upon this 6 Georgian scrapbook 5 has been 
written by Mrs. Stirling (author of Coke of Nor¬ 
folk, Macdonald of the Isles , etc.), and is the first 
article in her book entitled A Painter of Dreams 
(published by John Lane at the Bodley Head 
in 1915). Tne second article in this book is 
called 4 A Friend of Freedom,’ and is a sketch 
of Diana’s elder son William. 

Diana counted among her friends the cele¬ 
brated Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, in whose 
Letters we find a mention of her, written from 
Avignon on June 1, new style, 1743 (vol. ii. 
of the Letters , page 120). Godfrey and Diana 
had gone abroad, and passed by Avignon, 
where the friends met. 4 Mrs. Bosville,’ says 
Lady Mary, 4 is gone to Turin, where they intend 
to reside ; she had the good fortune to meet 
an English man-of-war on the coast, without 
which she would have found the passage very 
difficult. She had so much her journey at 
heart, that she undertook to ride over the 
mountains from Nissa to Savona, but I believe 


108 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

(notwithstanding her youth and spirits) she 
would have found the execution impossible. 
She has chosen the most agreeable Court in 
Europe, where the English are extremely 
caressed. But it is necessary to be young and 
gay for such projects.’ 

The Bosvilles spent at least one winter at 
Turin, where we hear she was welcomed at the 
Court as a great ornament to the circle. 

4 Nissa 5 or Nice remained for long a danger¬ 
ous way by which to pass over the mountains 
into Italy. Augustus Hare, in his South- 
Western France , tells us of the adventure of 
Lady Bute in the days of the great Napoleon. 
She was stopped by bandits in the mountains 
above Nice, and had all she carried taken from 
her—not only diamonds, but also a bottle of 
laudanum which she used medicinally. This 
was thought by the bandits to be a new kind 
of liqueur, and they all drank it, with the result 
that sleep overpowered them in a cornfield, 
where they were found and captured by the 
gendarmerie , much to the delight of the neigh¬ 
bourhood, which had long suffered from them. 
But judge of the shock felt by the good citizens 
of Nice when it was discovered that most of these 
brigands were young men belonging to the best 



EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 109 


and most honoured families of the town! 
Probably they had met Lady Bute at a Nice 
entertainment and admired her diamonds ! 

Diana and Godfrey settled at Gunthwaite, 
and also had a London house. The historian 
Hunter calls Diana 6 this amiable and ingenious 
lady 5 ; and nearly twenty years after her 
eulogy by Lady Mary, another and a greater 
celebrity paid her his tribute—no less a person 
than the venerated Dr. Johnson. Boswell has 
recorded the meeting between these two as 
having happened in March 1772 at the Pan¬ 
theon, where he and Dr. Johnson were walking, 
and where they were 4 joined by Mrs. Bosville 
of Gunthwaite, in Yorkshire. 5 It is a pity that 
he has not recorded their conversation nor any 
utterance of the lady’s, but he does tell us Dr. 
Johnson’s comment upon her after she had 
passed on. He pronounced her to be 4 a 
mighty intelligent lady.’ One wishes one could 
know exactly how the great Doctor struck the 
lively lady ! Boswell claimed kinship with the 
Bosvilles, and later visited them at Thorpe, 
where still remains his gift to Godfrey of an 
inscribed copy of his History of Corsica . He had 
desired to be Godfrey’s son-in-law ! but the 
object of his devotion had married in 1768—as 




110 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


we shall see. Later, too, there is a letter of his 
to Godfrey which will be found on page 183. 
Both it and Corsica are safely preserved at 
Thorpe. 

When Godfrey succeeded to Biana, in 1762, 
he and Diana seem to have spent a good part 
of their time there, as well as at Gunthwaite, 
and in the London house in Great Russell Street. 
But in 1773 the home they chose to inhabit 
above all others was left to them. This was 
Thorpe in the East Riding. They seem at once 
to have let Gunthwaite to tenants, and to have 
removed to Thorpe. 

This estate of Thorpe, bequeathed by Mr. 
Hassell, consisted in 1773 only of 1340 acres, 
but these lay all together and surrounded what 
was then considered a far more comfortable 
and modern house than that of Gunthwaite. 
Other property, however, besides Thorpe was 
included in Mr. Hassell’s legacy ; there was 
some land in Brandesburton and a little in 
Rotsea, and two farms in Hutton Ambo, which 
came originally through a Mrs. Hassell, great- 
great-great-grandmother of the testator, who 
was born a Mansfield, and inherited from her 
childless brother the manor of Hutton Bardolph 
in East Hutton on Derwent, in the North 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 111 


Riding of Yorkshire. (See Hassell Notes in 
Appendix, p. 253.) 

The will of John Mansfield is at Thorpe ; it 
is a large deed, in parchment, with four seals 
hanging to it, and is dated February 18, 45th 
Elizabeth (1603). Another large deed is with it, 
which is a lease of Helmsley Castle, out-buildings, 
etc., to William Watson of Cockfield, co. Durham ; 
this is dated August 4,16th Charles n. (1664), and 
is twice signed by the second Duke of Bucking¬ 
ham (Pope’s Villiers). William Watson’s wife 
was Elizabeth Hassell, daughter of Thomas 
Hassell of Hutton-upon-Derwent, Esq., and a 
barrister-at-law, and his wife Elizabeth, daugh¬ 
ter of Barney Wood of Thorpe, in the county 
of York, Esq., also a barrister-at-law. Here we 
have the first link of Thorpe to Hutton, and so 
Hutton to Thorpe eventually. William Wat¬ 
son himself sounds a picturesque figure in the 
Hassell Pedigree; he is ‘ Gentleman of the 
Horse to George Villiers, Duke of Buckingham, 
and likewise one of the equerries of King 
Charles n.’ But Helmsley Castle, unlike Hutton 
Bardolph, remained remote from Hassell pos¬ 
session. The Duke’s two signatures upon the 
above-mentioned deed are beautiful examples 
of penmanship, not at all what one would 


112 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

have expected from a dissolute courtier of 
Charles n. 

Godfrey and Diana (Wentworth) Bosville had 
two sons and two daughters. Of the elder son 
William, as of the two daughters Elizabeth 
Diana and Julia, an account will be given 
presently. The second son, Thomas Blackett, 
entered the Army. The ‘ Warrant of his Com¬ 
mission as Captain in A Company of the Cold¬ 
stream Foot Guards,’ dated May 26, 1789, is 
signed by His Majesty’s command, ‘ W. W. 
Grenville,’ and is preserved at Thorpe. But by 
1789 he had been some time in the Army ; he 
served in America from April 1776 to May 1777, 
when he returned to England on sick leave. His 
death occurred in consequence of his extra¬ 
ordinary height, which was 6 feet 4 inches. 
At the battle of Liencelles in French Flanders, 
fought in 1793, shortly before the battle of 
Dunkirk, he was shot through the mouth by 
a bullet which had passed over the head of 
Captain Fitzroy, who was standing just in front 
of Thomas Bosville. His death excited great 
interest, and the contemporary poet, Mont¬ 
gomery, celebrated the event in very bad verse. 
In the following quotation from this effusion, 
allusion is made to the former Miss Wilson 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 113 


(can her father have been of Broomhead ?), 
the wife of Captain Bosville, that lady who had 

to Bosville’s arms 

Consign’d the virgin treasure of her charms, 

Ere twice the inconstant moon renew’d her horn 
Saw the gay bridegroom from her bosom tom; 

From weeping love at Glory’s call he fled, 

And made a soldier’s grave his nuptial bed. 

There is a very bad little painting at Thorpe 
inscribed on the back in Diana Bosville’s 
writing, 4 Painted by Captain Bosville, 1782.’ If 
the date were not quite so early we might sup¬ 
pose it to be an attempt to depict Miss Wilson. 
It shows a round-faced, fair, blue-eyed girl in a 
little low-cut blue bodice over a white chemi¬ 
sette, also low cut, and wearing what looks like 
a bridal veil. 

Another relic of this Thomas still at Thorpe 
consists of two letters in the round copperplate 
writing of early youth, from Tommy, who writes 
from Cheam School in 1767 to his 4 Dear Papa 5 
and 4 Dear Mama ’ respectively, and sending his 
love 4 to my brother and sisters.’ The letters 
in each case give the date of the holidays, and 
make request about his being sent for. It 
must have been a long journey from Cheam to 
Gunthwaite for a little boy—the 4 dutiful son,’ 
as he signs himself. 

H 


114 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


Mr. Gilpin was then headmaster at Cheam, 
and he has instructed Tommy to ask whether 
he shall be sent home by stage-coach or be 
fetched. 

All the family seem to have been much 
attached to each other, and there is a charming 
little memento still at Thorpe of some Christmas 
Day when, judging by the writing on it, Diana 
Wentworth must have made and given it to 
her fiance , Godfrey Bosville. It is a little 
envelope, very neatly cut out from stiff paper 
and made to close with a little loop passed 
through the opposite flap. It is edged round 
with dark painted lines on the white paper, and 
on the front a sprig of mistletoe is painted. 
Inside is still the piece of sticking-plaster which 
the envelope is made to contain, and across the 
inside of the tiny receptacle Diana has written 
two lines :— 

With Friendship join’d, oh ! lend thy healing aid 
To cure all wounds, save those by Cupid made. 

Some old accounts still at Thorpe tell us a 
little more about 4 Tommy.’ 

Evidently he was not only sent to school by 
way of London, but had some joy in passing 
through, for we read—noting first the fact 
that James Preston was evidently a trusted 



EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 115 

servant, whose wages (very high for that 
date) are put down in 1757 as £30, 4 due 
Jany. 25 ’ :— 

James and Tommy to the Play . .£040 

Lobby-box Doorkeeper ... 50 

(his tip was more than the tickets !); 


and also— 

Tommy a pair of shoes ... 30 

Tommy Leather breeches ... 60 

do. kneebuckles ... 5 

Altering Tommy’s Clothes ... 2 0 


(We know how very tall Tommy grew to be ; 
no doubt he was the despair of those who pro¬ 
vided his outfit.) The next entry is :— 

Mr. Gilpin’s bill for Tommy . . £31 5 0 

This of course is his Cheam School fees ; and 


at the same time is noted— 

Usher and servants at Christmas . 2/ 

Then comes— 

Tommy a Hat ..... 7 

Pair of Shoes for Tommy . . .36 

Pair of Gloves for Do. ... 1 


Mercifully for Tommy, we do not find the 
same large bills for medicine as we do for his 
father, when in 1734 4 Master Bosville ’ was 





116 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


unwell. Then the drugs for six months came 
to £l, 11s. 6d., the very same sum as is put 
down for the boy’s 4 teaching ’ at Gunthwaite, 
with 10s. 6d. for 4 Cyphering book,’ Is. 8d. for 
pens, and Is. 6d. for ink. 

On the same page of the accounts with 
Tommy’s shoes and gloves, we have the fol¬ 
lowing entry for his elder brother Billy, now 
Ensign Bosville :— 

Hat at Wagner’s . . . .£126 

There are many entries later for Ensign Bos¬ 
ville ; the chief is for his commission as 
ensign, for which in 1761 the sum of £950 was 
paid as a deposit for it. The bills for his 
clothes seem to show that men of that day, 
like present men, loved to have lots of pairs 
of boots, for one reads: 4 En s Bosville 14 
pairs of Shoebuckles,’ £4, 18s., followed by 4 1 
pair Pumps stitched,’ 8d., and by 4 Mending 
his garters,’ Id. Julia’s pair of gloves, like 
Tommy’s, cost only Is. 

It is interesting to look over these accounts 
of the fourth Godfrey Bosville, comparing them 
mentally with present-day prices and needs. 
Here are some of them :— 

In 1767, on April 14, wax candles come to 



EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 117 


£l, 14s. In 1766 tallow candles are down at 
£3, 15s. 9d ; whereas in 1654 an older list has 
4 5 dozen candles, 5 14s. In 1766, 4 for a Horse 5 
is put down at £6, 6s. ; and later, 4 fetching 
Billy’s horses from Hull, 5 £l, Is. For Dr. 
James’s Powders the large sum of £14, 14s. 
is paid ; it seems enormous, especially when 
compared with the servants’ wages. In 
1740 there is a list of these latter, which 

i 

reads :— 


Rebecka Jackson 
Mary Smith 
Sarah Marshall . 
Sarah Howden . 


£6 a year 
£5 a year 
£ 2 , 10 / 
£ 2 , 10 / 


This would be at Gunthwaite, and about the 
same date the Bosvilles gave as follows:—For 
grouse, Is. each ; hares, Is. ; woodcock and 
snipe, 6d. each ; butter, 6d. or 7d. per lb. ; 
ducks, 9d. to Is. 2d. a couple; chickens, 7d. and 
8d. a couple ; beef, 3d. or 3|d. per lb.; mutton, 
4d. per lb.; 4 Hysonn Tea,’ 18s. per lb. ; Green 
Tea, 14s. ; Bohea, 16s. ; coffee, 5s. 4d. per lb. 

It seems so odd to us that in a country house 
game should have to be bought. It appears 
that Abraham Crossley, no doubt the tenant 
of the Bosville moors at Midhope, supplied the 


118 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


above game, as—for October 1766—we have 


the following entry :— 

A. Crossley: 29 Woodcocks . . 14/6 

16 Partridges . . . 8/ 

11 Snipe ... 5/6 

6 Hares ... 6/ 


But for wine—at any rate later, at Thorpe— 
far more money was paid. Here is a list ‘ for 
Wines in London,’ so possibly this was for 
entertaining in Great Russell Street:— 


Des Mages Madeira . . . . £3 14 0 

A Pipe Cask ..... 76 

Pardoe Pipe Port . . . . 38 0 0 

Do. wh d Mountain (!) in bottles . 9 10 0 

One dozen Canary . . . .200 

Claret.5 0 

Corks.11 6 

Bottles . . . . . .16 9 


and for three lottery tickets, one of which, an 
Irish Free State Lottery one, is still at Thorpe, 
the usually sensible Godfrey paid £37. Coals 
cost, ‘ five Chaldron coals, 35s.,’ £9 ; and beer, 
‘ 15 Barrels, £7, 2s. 6d.’; while ‘ Chappell 
Cyder ’ is down at £3, 7s. 8d. (did they refresh 
after a long sermon ?); and ‘ 2 Livery Hats ’ 
at Wagner’s cost as much as £2, 14s. An 
interesting entry in June 1766 is, on the 23rd : 






EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 119 


4 Our Journey to Cambridge, 5 £14, 2s. Godfrey 
Bosville also puts down various taxes : his 
Coach Tax, due April 25, was paid on November 
1, 1766, and cost him £4 ; his Plate Tax for 
600 oz. (where is all that plate now ?) was 
£1,10s.; his Lady Day Yearly Land Tax came 
to £10, 2s. 8d. in those happy days; while his 
Easter offering, 4 D r Gaily 5 s Easter offering, 5 
at 5s. hardly seems very generous. On Lady 
Day 1767 he pays the Window Tax, £3, 2s. 6d. 
That oppressive impost, at least, has vanished. 
Nothing seems given for the garden, except 
6 Plants and Slips, 5 £l, Is. 6d., on April 18,1767. 
His year’s scavenger’s bill is 10s. 6d. 

Nothing seems grudged to his wife and chil¬ 
dren ; even when Mrs. Bosville has a 4 Bill on 
Cockshutt 5 for £50, no remark is made. All 
these later accounts, with many more items 
than those quoted, are upon six folded sheets 
of paper only ; there must have been many 
more once. 

Before the Bosville family left Gunthwaite 
and came to live at Thorpe, an important family 
event had taken place : the marriage of the 
elder daughter Elizabeth Diana. Both sisters 
were above the average in looks ; both were 
painted by Sir Joshua Reynolds (Julia’s por- 


120 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

trait is still at Thorpe); and both had many 
suitors. One of the elder girl’s admirers had 
been, as before said, James Boswell, a kinsman 
although a Scot of the Auchinleck family. Her 
bridegroom was a Highlander and the head of 
a famous Celtic family, that of the Isles—Sir 
Alexander (later first Lord) Macdonald. They 
may ha\ e done some of their courting in the 
glades of Gunthwaite or in Godfrey and 
Bridget’s old summer-house in the garden 
there, but the wedding took place in London, 
from the family house there, no longer in Great 
Russell Street but in Welbeck Street, and the 
wedding was solemnised in the Church of St. 
Giles-in-the-Fields. The bride was not quite 
twenty. She had been christened in Denby 
Chapel, July 25, 1748, and her wedding day 
i\as May 3, 1768. No one knew how much 
that wedding would come to mean for Gun¬ 
thwaite and Thorpe. Elizabeth Diana went 
with her Highland chief to live in the lovely 
Isle of Skye, where later on, in a makeshift 
house which had temporarily taken the place 
of one burned by troopers of William hi. in 
revenge for Killiecrankie (1689), at Armadale, 
they were visited by Dr. Johnson and his ad¬ 
miring Boswell. The fact that the latter had 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 121 


aspired in vain to the hand of his hostess no 
doubt accounts for the ill-natured description 
of this visit to the home of his successful 
rival which is to be found in the Tour to the 
Hebrides , but his malice did not disturb the 
young couple’s happiness, which as time went 
on was increased by the advent of children. 
Their second son was named Godfrey after his 
maternal grandfather. Lord Macdonald’s letter 
to his father-in-law 4 asking this favour ’ still 
exists in a rather torn condition at Thorpe. It 
was written from Edinburgh, where Godfrey 
Macdonald was born on October 13, 1776. 
Lady Macdonald died, aged only forty-one, in 
1789 ; it is through her that Thorpe and Gun- 
thwaite, Eastburn, Hutton, etc., belong to her 
great-great-great-grandson, Sir Alexander Mac¬ 
donald of the Isles. 

At Thorpe every one appears to have led a 
busy, occupied life : seeing the neighbours a 
good deal, reading the new books and pam¬ 
phlets, and occasionally going abroad. Mrs. 
Stirling, in her Annals of a Yorkshire House , 
has some interesting sidelights on Thorpe in the 
days of Godfrey and Diana. She quotes letters 
from Mrs. Greame of Sewerby to her brother, 
Walter Spencer Stanhope ; one of these, dated 




122 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

July 16, 1779, says : 6 We dined at Thorpe, 
where we met the officers [of the Northumber¬ 
land Militia, come to guard the coast against 
the depredations of Paul Jones] and most of 
the neighbours in a magnificent Roothouse ; 
walked in a Grove which was illuminated in 
the manner of \ auxhall. We are engaged to 
dine at Thorpe on Wednesday, being Mr. W. 
Bosville’s birthday, when we are to have 
illuminations.’ The c magnificent Roothouse 5 
was no doubt the reception room and conserva¬ 
tory built close to Thorpe by Godfrey and 
Diana, who must have found the house in itself 
rather small for their large number of guests— 
as indeed it was at this time, until they had 
finished building the gallery, begun in 1778. 
The original house consisted of what is now the 
central block, and was built with a basement 
for kitchen, still-room, cellars, etc.; a ground 
floor with four parlours opening on to a double 
hall, the south part of which contained the 
staircase ; this led up to an open room with 
four bedrooms round, and a stair up to a higher 
storey containing seven rooms. The writer is 
not sure exactly when the Bosvilles added the 
present dining-room. The gallery was begun 
in 1778, as one of the plans of the architect 



EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 123 


with that date on it, also some of his letters, 
still exist to show this. He was named Linley. 
It is possible, from what his letters say of having 
4 at last found a proper plaisterer ’ for the ceil¬ 
ing, that the Adam work going on at Sledmere 
at this time may have furnished the necessary 
workman. 

Family tradition talks of the first party held 
in the gallery being one to celebrate the wedding 
of the younger Bosville daughter Julia, which 
took place in St. George’s, Hanover Square, 
London, on August 1, 1780. Her husband was 
William Ward, later the third Viscount Dudley 
and Ward. 

In later days the gallery provided a home for 
the beautiful 4 old masters 5 collected by the 
grandson of Godfrey and Diana, the third Lord 
Macdonald. It was he who added bedrooms 
above gallery and dining-room—and in his day, 
also, that the two parlours to east of the hall 
were thrown into one room and called the 
drawing-room. But now the whole of one of 
its sides is books, and it is called the library. 
When the change was made, the two fireplaces 
were removed and one larger central one made, 
beautiful mahogany bookcases (made by Brown, 
the house-carpenter of the day) filling up the 


124 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

two 16 C 6 SS 6 S loft in the wall. The ceiling' was 
left plain until the present Sir Alexander Mac¬ 
donald of the Isles married and came to live at 
Thorpe, when the ceiling was covered with fine 
plaster-work, designed by Mr. S. Weatherley 
and carried out by Graham & Jackson, London. 
It was Sir Alexander’s mother who moved all 
the books into the room, out of the little north 
pailour opposite ; this has now been thrown 
into the hall. She, too, changed the three large 
sash-windows in the east wall of the gallery 
into central doors opening out upon a flagged 
path leading to the Grove and its wide gravel 
walk beyond. Her son, Sir Alexander, added 
the wing, etc., beyond the dining-room, with all 
its pleasant sunny rooms, ending in a block like 
the gallery and dining-room, containing a 
billiard-room below and a lovely sitting-room, 
v hich has a window every way of the compass 

and beautiful carved white wood recesses and 
arches above. 

There is a letter at Thorpe from Diana Bos- 
ville, dated 4 Thorp, August 9, 1774,’ and begin¬ 
ning simply 4 Sr.,’ so as no address is on it we 
cannot tell for whom it was meant. She says 
she writes for Mr. Bosville, to acknowledge a 
bank post bill, value £200, as he ‘set out 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 125 


yesterday for Northallerton, to vote for Mr. 
Crowe, who is one candidate for the North 
Riding Register office and Mr. Wanley the 
other. It is expected there will be a pretty 
smart contest between them.’ She adds, speak¬ 
ing of her younger daughter Julia, 6 Miss Bos- 
ville and I are going in a few days to York, 
where we expect to meet Mr. Bosville, and shall 
not return here until after the Races. There 
is generally a great meeting just before a 
general Election, and I hear all the Lodgings are 
taken.’ 

Nothing is ever said in any of the old papers 
about Rudston Church (the Thorpe parish 
church), except an old Hassell note saying, 
c John Whaley, Rector of Rudstone, received 
of Mr. Hassell 12 guineas for the year 1757 for 
all Tythes issuing out of Thorpe.’ 

At Thorpe there are two portraits of the 
fourth Godfrey Bosville—one quite a youthful 
one in blue velvet and white wig, and one 
painted in a large group by Philippe Mercier 
in 1740, at Bretton. The big canvas shows 
himself and Diana Wentworth in the centre ; 
Diana, in white satin and with pearls in her 
dark hair, is fishing in the Bretton lake ! which 
is just inside the foreground, while Godfrey is 



126 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

trying to show her the plans for the new house 
at Bretton, but she waves them away and goes 
on fishing. Her younger sisters are in a group 
on the bank to right, and on left under a tree 
sits her father, Sir William Wentworth, with a 
dog. On a letter at Thorpe, Diana has noted 
that the writer, S. Moyle, made the plan of 
Bretton House, and that he was a friend of her 
father, who thought much of him. 

Besides the beautiful Sir Joshua picture of 
Julia Bosville (which has been twice engraved) 
at Thorpe, there is a very charming portrait 
of Annabella Wentworth, Diana Bosville’s 
sister, who has a delightful sympathetic face ; 
she is dark, like her sister Diana Bosville, but 
has a softer expression. Her little history may 
be gleaned at Thorpe from letters speaking of 
her—wondering whether she will marry the 
Cambridgeshire squire, Mr. Dorril, aged forty- 
two, 6 with an estate some 1000 years in the 
family,’ or the rich brewer Mr. Stephenson, not 
much younger. Finally Annabella, wanting 
none of them, went abroad 4 with a Female 
friend,’ and died at Nancy at the age of thirty- 
nine, and was buried at Fenebranges in the 
Lorraine Allemande. This journey of Anna- 
bella’s to Nancy is explained in a letter from 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSYILLES 127 


one of her sisters (Elizabeth Wentworth) to 
another (Diana Bosville), which is directed to 
Biana. It is dated from Frith Street, London, 
July 5, 1772. 

4 Dear Sister ’ (it runs),— 4 Would you be 
surprised to hear y l I was going into Flanders 
to be a pensioner in a Convent ? I am not 
going this summer, but Annabella is. Last 
Saturday morning she called upon Sir Thomas 
[their brother], she informed him that in six 
weeks she was to set out with Mrs. Conyers for 
Nance, y l she proposed being a pensioner there 
in the same convent with Miss Hollo and did 
not think of returning to England of two or 
three years : y* her maid was to leave her, y* 
she designed to dismiss her Man and wished to 
have Tom Hassell’s Poll for to succeed Sally 
Hurst and believed she would write to him 
about her. 

4 What is your opinion of this scheme ? I 
shall not be astonished if she becomes a con¬ 
vert, but I shall be very sorry. From this step 
and her late behaviour I fear her judgment and 
understanding are not in their perfect sound 
state. I don’t know whether any of the 
favourite M ds [Macdonalds] are of the 



128 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

party. She made a very short stay at Lord 
-D s [Dudley s], I have not had a glimpse 
of her since you left town, and as Sir Thomas 
is gone (he set out this morning) I shall hear 
no more of her. He thinks it a strange plan. 
You will see him soon at Biana. He is now at 
Everton, at Colo 1 AstelPs in Bedfordshire. 5 

This letter is so full of talk, all amusing, that 
it must be continued to its end :— 

4 Last Monday I went with Mr. and Miss 
Wentworth to ye Nabob’s—Tuesday dined with 
Mrs. Windham, Wednesday went to Ranelagh, 
Thursday to Vauxhall with Sir Thomas, Colo 1 
Twistleton and Miss Gill, Friday to ye Nabob 
again, Saturday to Saddler’s Wells. I have 
been to see Mount .Etna at Marylebone. The 
fireworks are beautiful though not so Grand 
as those upon tower-hill. Y r e Cavern of Cyclops 
and flowing of ye Lava was extremely fine. I 
am more pleased with the Nabob than any¬ 
thing I have ever seen of our Aristophanes, 
perhaps I comprehend it better. The humour¬ 
ous speech on Whittington and his Cat, at his 
admission to be a member of ye Society of 
Antiquarians, was vastly applauded. You 
remember it. 5 










A N N A UK LL A W KNT \V () UT11 






EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 129 


We shall hear more of Colonel Twistleton and 
Miss Gill, but must first return to poor Anna- 
bella. Her story is continued by a letter from 
her at Thorpe, which is also her will. It is 
addressed to 4 Miss Jean Rollo of Vandowre 
near Nancy in Lorraine,’ and contains a request 
that 4 My dear Rollo ’ should pay various 
legacies to servants and others, including £100 
of 4 Lawfull Money of Great Britain to my 
cousin Madame la Comtesse de Gastaldi,’ and 
£500 to Mary Allot (a cousin also) 4 that 
married Mr. Tullok ’ (many of this lady’s 
letters remain at Thorpe); and to Miss Eliza¬ 
beth Payne of Queen’s Square, Bloomsbury, 
£20 for a ring. Miss Rollo, the Comtesse de 
Gastaldi, and Annabella appear all to have been 
living together at Nancy in Lorraine. A copy 
of the whole will of Annabella is in one of the 
Wentworth letters. It leaves all to Jean Rollo ; 
this explains why Miss Rollo is asked to attend 
to the legacies. This will was exceedingly un¬ 
popular in Annabella’s family, but in the end 
one hears no more of it. 

Among the frequent visitors to the Bosvilles 
was Diana’s brother, Sir Thomas Wentworth 
(afterwards Sir Thomas Blackett), and when 
the brother and sister were apart he often wrote 

i 


130 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

to her. Many of these letters are at Thorpe, 
and they give a delightful picture of family 
intimacy. These letters begin as early as 1746 
—addressed at that date to Gunthwaite. In 
the August of that year Thomas Wentworth 
was at Maestricht, to which place he says he 
has had a long and tedious journey, and has 
been c with the Army these six weeks past,’ 
and relates how he was 4 very civily received by 
many of the Officers and was also presented to 
Prince Charles, Marshal Bathiani and Prince of 
Hesse and dined with them under the Great 
Tent.’ He was expecting to set out in an hour’s 
time c in the voiture to Bois-le-Duc and so 
directly to the Hague. 5 

Later, from London, he wants to know how 
his sister likes her new 6 Cloathes,’ and wishes 
her health to wear them, if approved of, which 
will give him courage to undertake more com¬ 
missions of the sort. He hopes, too, that they 
came in time for Julia to show them off at 
Buxton. This Julia was another Wentworth 
sister. She married in 1760 the Rev. Dr. John 
de Chaire, Vicar of Horley and Hornton, Rector 
of Rissington, and a King’s Chaplain. There 
are letters of hers too at Thorpe. 

In 1752 Sir Thomas goes to Newmarket races 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 131 


with 6 Godfrey Wentworth j r . 5 They went 
thither in a post-chaise and were 4 once fairly 
overturned but no harm done.’ He met Mr. 
Osbaldistone there. He did not stay in New¬ 
market, as the place was disagreeable from so 
much drinking and swearing going on in it, but 
he put up at Cambridge and came over for the 
races 4 in the evening, 5 which seems an odd 
time. 

It is interesting to find a letter, in 1757, 
written from Thorpe, where he must have been 
staying with his aunt, Mrs. Hassell, and her 
husband. Diana was then in 4 Great Russel 
Street Bloomsbury London. 5 This letter is 
written on December 6, and begins : 4 We have 
had fine weather since I have been here which 
has afforded good diversion in hauking and we 
are now become peaceable as junketting is over 
—(as Tom Hassell calls it)—for all the neigh¬ 
bours have been very civil in asking us to 
dinner, except Sir G. Boynton who has been 
very ill but is now a little better and S r George 
Stricland, who minds nothing but planting 
children and trees. 5 

(This was Sir George Strickland, fifth 
Baronet, of Boynton Hall. There is a further 
reference to him in another letter, as follows : 




132 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

c Sir George Strickland and his family are at 
Naples and live in a retir’d manner.’) 

The letter of December 1757 continues : ‘ Sir 
W m Foulis is at Mrs. Robinson’s of Buckton 
laying close siege to Miss Robinson and it is 
generally believ’d that a Capitulation is on the 
Carpet. She looks very well and is in high 
spirits. She leads a disagreeable life with her 
Father and no doubt the change will suit her 
Inclinations as well as it would many others. 
Mrs. Graham [Greame] is very well and desir’d 
her Comp ts to you, she has now the amusement 
of taking care of a Gouty and Sickly Husband.’ 

Sir Thomas gossips away for a long time, and 
adds a note that Sir Griffith Boynton has just 
sent to ask them to dinner, and they were 
going. In another letter this incorrigible gossip 
tells us that 6 Sir Griffith Boynton is gone to 
London and is to marry Miss Hebblethwaite 
of Bridlington, a very pretty Girl and Young.’ 
This Sir Griffith was the sixth Baronet, and 
Mary Heblethwayte was his second wife and 
the mother of the two next Baronets, Sir 
Griffith and Sir Francis. 

Talking in 1766 of some York gaieties, he 
says of one girl Sally, that she 4 danced like a 
Tub, but not with me, for I neither danced 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 133 


minuets nor Country Dances.’ Miss Chaloner, 
he says, was reckoned the beauty, and he 
speaks of the latter’s sister, Mrs. Lascelles, 
dancing also, but going home early to take care 
of her health. By this time Thomas Went¬ 
worth was living at Bessingby (he spells it 
Bessonby), but says, 4 1 have given warning to 
quit this house next year to Captain Hudson.’ 

In 1764, when 4 Dear D y ’ was in London and 
he himself at Bretton, he says of the opera— 
which he always seemed to look forward to 
much, but now seemed to consider had greatly 
declined in attraction: 4 You gave yourselves 
more trouble about the Opera than I thought 
you would, but upon second thoughts, you only 
went there to see the Prince, like many others, 
and as to Mingotti, she never had a Voice since 
I knew her. She and Giardini ought to adver¬ 
tise that the Prince would be there every night, 
for I know nothing else to induce people to 
come, for I told you before, that the Opera was 
miserably bad, but the Polite Taste was to 
appear there ; such is the Degeneracy of the 
Present Time, that Fashion should get the 
better of true Music and Merit in the performers, 
such are the Ears of High Quality and the Apes, 
I am really bien mortijie that such Performers are 


134 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


supported, for an Opera was always my principal 
public Diversion and as long as Mingotti stays, 
for I will not say sings, I shall never go . 5 

There had been some idea of Sir William 
setting up his son Thomas in a house of his 
own, but in 1763 the father died, and his son suc¬ 
ceeded him at Bretton and took up his duties 
there. In 1765 he was High Sheriff of Yorkshire. 

We will now T go back to Elizabeth Went¬ 
worth’s gossip. She is still full of 4 ye Nabob , 5 
and says that one evening 4 Mrs. Fearon in y e 
character of Lady Catherine Coldstream spoke 
an Epilogue ; a Gentleman who sat behind me 
said it was stupid, y* there was no wit in it. 
As it was spoken in very broad Scotch, I could 
not help asking ye Gentleman if he understood 
what she said, his answer was, hardly a word. 
There was barly a word I did not perfectly 
understand and I thought it a good one and 
well spoke. So here is two different opinions 
for yu. I wish’d yu there to judge for yourself . 5 

The letter continues later on : 4 Monday 

evening—I am just returned from Kinsington 
Gardings [spelling is not dear Elizabeth’s 
strong point]. I met Annabella and Captain 
Bosville [Billy, no doubt] walking together, we 
saluted en passant —I was with Colo 1 Twistleton 



EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 135 


and Miss Gill. I set Miss Gill down, she pressed 
me to walk in, but on finding that Mrs. Norton 
had assembled her congregation and was in y e 
midst of her prayers, I thought it most polite 
to retire. They go out of town tomorrow ’; 
then, after speaking of commissions done for 
her sister, she adds : 4 If you have any more 
commands, write soon, for I hope to leave town 
in ten days’ time. I shall stop at Meriton.’ 
And before she ends her letter she indulges in 
one last bit of gossip : 6 Lady Grosvener was 
at Marybone, her Maidservant is well dressed 
and goes about with her as a Companion ’ ; 
concluding with : 4 1 expected Tommy to dine 
with me today—Mrs. Windham desired me to 
present her Comp ts . My love attends you and 
your family and I am your affect sister 

4 E. \Yentworth . 5 

Having had our interest in Colonel Twistle- 
ton and Miss Gill revived, we must here quote 
from a letter of Elizabeth’s to her sister, dated 
the following July 18 :— 

4 You are right—Col. T. is paying his atten¬ 
tions to Miss Gill. Last Monday se’ennight 
Col. T. called upon me in the morning and 
begged to ask my opinion upon something very 




136 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

interesting to him. I guessed what it was. He 
desired to know whether I thought Miss G. 
would accept of him were he to make her an 
offer. I said I could not pretend to say; 
Madam, said he, she goes out of town tomorrow 
morning. I see your Chariot is at y* 5 door, and 
you will oblige me infinitely if you will call 
upon her and desire she will give me leave to 
waite upon her this afternoon.—I abridge his 
discourse—It was entertaining. 30,000 ran 
more in his head than anything else. Great 
fortunes need not be vain upon offers. I called 
upon Miss G.—she was not at home, I bid ’em 
drive to a Milliner where I had some business 
and there by chance I met her. I asked her 
to go with me to Tavistock Street, where I was 
going to bespeak a Habit, and in the way I 
executed my commission. At half past three 
he called upon me and I made him happy by 
telling him at 6 in the afternoon y 6 Lady would 
be glad to see him. He seems to have won 
Mrs. Norton’s heart. He is gone after her into 
Somersetshire. Don’t mention this, as I am in 
y 6 secret and perhaps it may not turn out a 

match. The man Mrs. C- was anxious to 

marry her to was Astley. She quarrelled with 
her for refusing him.’ 



EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 137 


Sir Thomas Wentworth was a great deal in 
London, whence he continued to send all the 
news of the town to his 4 Dear D y .’ 

In May 1763 he tells her he is 4 setting for my 
Picture at Mr. Rennolds today, the 4th time.’ 
One hopes that this portrait has not shared 
the fate of that of Sir Walter Blackett, about 
which the following lines exist at Thorpe, in 
the writing of Thomas Wentworth. They are 
attributed to Sir Walter Blackett himself when 
his picture, 4 Done by Sir Joshua Reynolds for 
170 guineas,’ faded badly, and they are as 
follows :— 

The Art of Painting was at first designed 
To call, tho’ dead, our Ancestors to mind. 

But this damned Botcher hath reversed the Plan 
And made the Picture die before the Man. 

In the same letter which tells of his sitting 
to Sir Joshua, Thomas Wentworth says : 4 Billy 
sends his duty and love to you all,’ so his elder 
nephew must have been with him. He always 
seemed very fond of this boy and was very 
anxious about him when his parents had him 
inoculated against smallpox, in York, some 
time in 1751 ; and when Billy was a little boy 
he was painted standing at his uncle’s knee, 
the two looking much pleased with each other. 


138 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


This picture still hangs at Thorpe. The uncle, 
very smart in embroidered blue velvet, has a 
flute in one hand and in the other a page of 
music which can easily be read and which is a 
minuet. He has evidently been playing a tune 
to Billy, and we see that his love of the Opera 
was not his only musical attribute. 

A letter of his to Diana, on May 18, 1751, is 
full of amusing town talk, and in speaking of 
the two beautiful Gunning sisters, then the 
admired of all in society, he says : 4 1 met ’em 
at a Rout and as they don’t play at Cards it 
gives a good opportunity de lew' en conter des 
jlem'ettes & being ambitious of making an 
acquaintance with ’em, I made a Truce with 
my Modesty & seated myself between ’em 
upon an unengaged Stool which favour’d my 
Happiness ; our Conversation I did not write 
down in my pocketbook so can’t amuse you 
with it, but you may suppose it to be something 
related to Small Talk. They are affable Girls 
& both so beautiful that I am yet in dispute 
which to become a Dangler to . . .’ 

In a later letter, dated merely June 21, he 
says : 4 Lady Coventry has left Dr. James and 
now has Dr. Duncan ; he makes her eat raw 
cucumbers unpared. She is carried in her 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 139 


Chair to the Coach.’ But that Gunning beauty 
was fated to die quite young of a consumption 
which seems to have been in her family. Some 
say her end was hastened by the poison of white 
lead, from which a cosmetic was made and used 
by her, perhaps to tone down her too hectic 
cheeks. The other lived to be the bride of two 
Dukes in succession—Hamilton and Argyll— 
and we shall never know which sister counted 
Thomas Wentworth among her danglers! 
4 Dangling 5 was a stage of attraction which he 
presumably never passed, for he died unmarried 
in 1792 at Bretton. 

When Godfrey and Diana succeeded to 
Thorpe in 1773, Thomas Wentworth writes on 
June 7 to 6 Dear D y ’ in London from Bretton, 
saying : 4 It must be needless to wish yu both 
Joy but Health to enjoy your new Estate & 
House, surely you may let a Body a House now 
except you ’ll keep ’em all to remove from one 
to t’other like King & Queen ’ ; and presently 
he talks of a 4 design to shoot woodcock at 
Flamborough this Seasen,’ and on August 16, 
1773, he writes to Godfrey :— 

4 Dear Bosville, —As I presume this letter 
will find you looking over and examining your 



140 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

new grounds at Thorp, rather than prancing 
and dancing at Scarbro’, I send you four pine¬ 
apples, knowing that they are not plentiful in 
that country, but if Miss Julia is at Scarbro’ 
she won’t want pineapples to sweeten her lips, 
supposing that any man had once tasted them 
and I heartily wish her success at that new 
exhibition.’ Evidently Julia had just grown 
up. He continues : 6 I hope that you have 
settled the Bransburton estate to your advan¬ 
tage. You will surely be back again for Wake¬ 
field races. . . .’ Further on we get a sidelight 
upon grouse shooting, which sounds oddly in 
modern ears : c Mr. Spencer has the gout. He 
was upon the moors last Thursday and caught 
nothing ! I was upon Cumberworth and only 
got four birds ; it was very hot and no wind.’ 

In 1778 Thomas begins to sign Blackett 
instead of Wentworth, so by then he must have 
come into his Northumbrian property. 

In an earlier letter there is the following 
observation : Tam glad to hear that Bos. is 
better of his Cough . . . for I thought he would 
have died last Sunday when I was at Penniston.’ 
Perhaps this cough was asthmatic ; it must 
indeed have been a bad one, or Godfrey Bos- 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 141 


ville would not have left the directions which 
are still at Thorpe, and which will be found on 
a later page. 

Her uncle Thomas Wentworth’s remarks 
about Julia Bosville at Scarbro’ recur to one 
when looking through a little packet of what 
are really love letters. One, indeed, is anony¬ 
mous, but one signed Thomas Hanmer, and 
dated from 4 Bettesfield near Whitchurch Shrop¬ 
shire ’ on June 18, 1777, makes one think that 
the writer considered himself engaged to Mr. 
Bosville’s daughter. He writes to him in Great 
Russell Street telling him that he is advised 
4 to stay over the day of election,’ which is 
4 the 26—tomorrow se’ennight,’ and that he fears 
4 your family will leave town before I can reach 
it and my dearest Love gone, too, to so great 
a distance as Edinburgh,’ and he begs to be 
told their route of travel. 4 If I could have 
that favor from her it would give me still 
greater satisfaction as I ever wish to be with 
her,’ so that he might perhaps manage a meet¬ 
ing somewhere on their road. Probably the 
Bosvilles were off to pay a family visit to the 
Macdonalds, and Skye being so far off, may have 
trysted with them in Edinburgh. Julia had 
begun to be wooed before this date, for a copy 


142 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

is at Thorpe of a letter which is addressed to 
some elderly swain who has not been too happy 
in the date of his request, which Julia’s father 
answers thus on April 8 , 1772, from Great 
Russell Street :— 

4 Sr,’ he says, 4 I am sorry you should have 
any Complaint of a neglect from me, but as the 
letter was signed a name I was unacquainted 
with & unfortunately dated the 1st of April I 
took it for some fictitious thing, the produce of 
the Antient Mirth of that day. 

4 My daughter is certainly free from all pre- 
deliction & your Estate I could have no possible 
objection to, but so great a difference in age as 
Twenty years is seldom attended with happi¬ 
ness. I take the more freedom in mentioning 
this objection as me nor my daughter can have 
any prepossessions against a person so entirely 
unknown to us, and whom we never made the 
least inquiry about, for the reason I have men¬ 
tioned above. I acknowledge myself greatly 
obliged to you for the preference that you have 
given to my daughter, and am Sir your most 
obedient Servant Godfrey Bosville.’ 

Another jpretendant with whom certainly the 
family was unacquainted was a Captain R. 



EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 143 


Shee in the French service. He describes how 
he first saw Julia, 6 the charming Miss Bos- 
ville,’ at the 4 Boxes Covent Garden,’ and how 
another day he saw her walking with two ladies 
and followed her home, and how since then he 
has not had a moment’s peace or ease on her 
account! 

Finally, however, we find the successful 
wooer declaring himself to 4 my dear Miss 
Bosville whom I adore and love with as much 
affection and sincerity as man ever loved 
woman. 5 It was Mr. William Ward who wrote 
so, the son of Lord Dudley, and who before 
long succeeded his father as third Viscount 
Dudley and Ward. They were married August 
1, 1780, at St. George’s, Hanover Square, and 
anything we glean later about Julia shows that 
she became a typical fine lady of fashion. She 
had one child, a son, afterwards the Cabinet 
Minister created first Earl of Dudley and Ward. 
This child was sent into the country to be 
brought up and seems to have seen little of his 
parents. He was very eccentric as well as 
clever, and many diverting stories are told of 
his absent-minded speeches. He never married. 
Julia Lady Dudley lived until 1833, ten years 
as a widow. She was much addicted to 


144 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

card-playing at Brighton, and when she died left 
any Bosville money she had to a distant cousin 
of her husband, Mr. Ward, whose son was 
created Earl of Dudley. Julia’s own son died 
before his mother. Her Reynolds’ picture as 
Julia Bosville which is at Thorpe is as fresh as 
the day on which it was painted : a contrast to 
her aunt’s portrait—Annabella’s—which has 
much faded. Lord Dudley seems to have liked 
his wife’s people very much, and this liking was 
shared by his son, from whom there are letters 
to the third Lord Macdonald at Thorpe. One 
congratulates him on his daughter’s engage¬ 
ment to Lord Hopetoun ; another of thanks for 
some whisky is thus expressed : 4 In my taste 
for whiskey at least I am worthy to be acknow¬ 
ledged the kinsman of a Highland chief.’ There 
is no date to this ; it may possibly be from 
Julia’s husband. 

The Wentworths were evidently great letter 
writers, and could discourse in most lively 
strains. Elizabeth tells us that 4 Every lady 
has a Hobby horse,’ and hers is riding. She 
bought not only a horse in London in 1772, but 
also 4 a genteel habit,’ and says she has ridden 
the horse twelve miles the day before she wrote 
to her sister at Biana, and is satisfied with her 




Sir Joshua Reynolds pinx. 

JULIA BOSVILLE, VISCOUNTESS DUDLEY AND WARD 
(From the picture at Thorpe) 





























EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 145 


purchase. Then she tells of the visits she is 
about to pay. Mrs. Astell had invited her in 
4 a very polite letter, but as my scheme is 
altered, I can’t accept.’ Her scheme seems to 
have been to reach Biana, which place she had 
not yet seen, before the family left it, but that 
she has had to give up to please her 4 Aunt 
Gordon,’ who tells her she 4 is very ill and has 
been taking medecine and is very low spirited 
& w d be happy to see Elizabeth at Leigh.’ 
Elizabeth remarks : 4 As she has always been 
extremely civil to me, I think she would take 
it ill if I were not to pay her a visit upon this 
invitation. ... I think of setting out next 
Friday but how long I shall stay at Leigh is 
more than I can tell.’ She has both her 
nephews, Billy and Tommy, coming to dine 
with her and promises to write from Leigh, 
but that letter is not forthcoming. When she 
next writes it is from North Street, Bright- 
helmston (Brighton), on September 5, 1773. 
This epistle is also addressed to her sister Diana, 
but this time to—or rather, at —Thorpe, near 
Bridlington, Yorkshire, and is as follows :— 

4 1 left London the 18 1 of July, so your letter 
followed me here. Two or three days before I 

K 




146 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

set out, I agreed with Mr. Prior for his house 
in Charlotte Street, Bloomsbury. It is to be 
ready for me about Xmas. The rent is fifty 
guineas per Annum. You saw y 6 House & 
liked it, but may have forgot it, as you saw so 
many. I have a running lease for Twenty-one 
years. After the 24th of June was passed, I 
thought, & was told, y* I was at liberty to take 
any house I pleased, without Wilkinsons being 
able to hurt me. Since I came here, I have had 
a letter, wrote by Wilkinson’s order, signed by 
three Attorneys to threaten me with a Chancery 
suit, if I don’t immediately take his house. 
Upon what grounds he can file a bill, I can’t 
divine, but this I am certain of, y* I have been 
extremely ill-used by these who pretended to 
interest themselves for me, they have not 

behaved like-but I won’t tire you with ye 

particulars. 

6 1 am greatly obliged to Mr. Cockshutt; he 
is a man of spirit and always acts as a Gentle¬ 
man. I gave no answer to Wilkinson’s letter. 
It is six weeks since I received it and I have 
heard no more from him. 

c I believe I shall stay here till November, for 
I pass my time very well, and have a House 
all to myself, which makes me quite at home. 



EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 147 


If you don’t go to London till after Xmas I 
will air your bed in Russell Street for you, till 
I have put necessaries into my own House. 
There are Bath Stoves in all y e Rooms, which 
Mrs. Hustler will buy for me, when Capt. Storr’s 
goods are sold. I am sorry I had left town 
before your letter arrived, as I should with 
pleasure have executed your orders. I left 
town abruptly in order to avoid some trouble. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edmonds [evidently her landlord 
and his wife in Frith Street] are the most 
infernal creatures y* any being can have y e 
misfortune to be under the same roof with. 

c The rides out about Brighthelmston are 
delightful, there is a beautiful variety in y e 
prospects, of hills covered with sheep, rich 
Vales and y e Sea. The mutton is remarkably 
good, owing to y e fine sweet grass on ye Downs 
being mixed with various aromatic Herbs which 
perfume y e air. The Wheatear, the English 
Ortolan, is now in high season, ’tis a fat 
luscious little Bird, very excellent if dressed y e 
same day it is killed, but in my opinion not 
eatable y e next day. Perhaps you have tasted 
them in france where they are called Cul-blancs. 
Wheatear is supposed to be a corruption of 
W—A, y e translation of y e french Name. ’Tis 


148 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


said, tho’ these birds are found in other parts 
of England, they are nowhere else tolerable. 
They are caught in snares by y e shepherds. I 
have made some excursions ; above Twenty 
miles off, I met with Williamson, who married 
Judith Allot, and his Wife. She cried for joy 
to see a countrywoman. Time and sorrow have 
made a woeful change in her appearance, she 
complains of ill-health, a cross covetous 
Husband and an idle Son. If you leave ye 
turnpike, y e roads are worse than they are in 
Yorkshire in y e Weald of Sussex. A lady who 
has a pretty place fifteen miles from hence, ye 
shortest way, gave me an invitation to her 
house, I never rode worse roads, after I had 
got off y e Downs. I staid all night. An old 
lady turned of 82 was there on a visit; she has 
all y e vivacity of 20 with y e knowledge y % read¬ 
ing and a long acquaintance with ye world 
gives. All her faculties are perfect, except her 
hearing, she is rather deafish. ’Tis a pleasure 
to see a person of y* age so lively, Mrs. Hoff¬ 
man, ye Lady of y e House, is a very pleasing 
agreeable woman and has a great look of ye 
Dutchesse of Argile, she is delicate now and 
has been very beautiful when in her bloom. 
Her Husband, to testify his love and esteem 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 149 


for her, left her his estate for ever. She has 
no children. 

c There is a great deal of company here yet. 
This has not been reckoned a good season. 
Wade complains she has not got money enough 
and games high every night. Most of Y e 
Quality are gone. Lady Barrimore’s children 
are here, I suppose you have heard y* her 
Husband shot himself. They all say Lord 
Sefton’s pleasure is driving a set of horses. 
He has six beautiful little black foresters with 
long tails. ’Tis y e fashion here for all 3^ fine 
ladies to wear Habits in a morning whether 
they ride on horseback or not and to walk with 
an umbrella in the hand. One Sunday Mr. 
Petwell—he married the younger Miss Blosset 
—preached on y e Steine upon a Table. He is 
exactly y e figure Geoffry Wildgrove is described 
and looks like a deluded fanatic, who believes 
himself divinely illuminated. This town 
swarms with Methodists. The Sunday before 
last y e Dean of Peterborough gave us an 
excellent Sermon, ’tis rare to hear such good 
sense from a Pulpit, and if it happened oftener, 
I should be a more constant attender of a 
Church. Last Sunday we had a very com¬ 
posing discourse, I sat in y* pew with Miss 




150 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

Lawes, she fell asleep before I lost my atten¬ 
tion. I have heard from a Gentleman that 
you was well as you passed through York on 
your vvay to Thorp. I hope to hear from you. 
My love attends all your family.—Your affec te 
sister E. W.’ 

Only one more letter remains in the little 
packet of those written by this lively Eliza¬ 
beth ; it is dated 6th March 1778, from the 
house in Charlotte Street, London, spoken of 
in her last effusion. Alas ! we hear no more 
of Colonel Twistleton and his heiress. But 
Elizabeth herself has changed her name; she 
is a Mrs. Walker, the wife of James Walker, 
M.D., of Springhead near Beverley, and appar¬ 
ently there is a younger ‘ Jimmy ’ also with her, 
possibly a stepson. It is the same gossipy, 
cheerful Elizabeth who writes. Nothing escapes 
her observation. ‘ T’other day,’ she says, ‘ I 
saw Ward [evidently Julia’s husband to bej 
driving a Phaeton. I was surprised to see him 
smoke along with a fine pair of horses—Full 
sails and mains ! I did not think he had it in 
him. I have not seen Lady Dudley [Ward’s 
mother] this winter. ’Tis reported y* Dutchess 
of Chandos is going to be married to Mr. 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 151 


Waters. Lady Home’s concerts begin next 
Sunday. I hope Mrs. Row’s dismals won’t con¬ 
fine her at home. She is lately become a Widow. 
Lady Home will not know what to do without 
her. I have just heard that Luke Liliston is 
dead at Bath, where he went for his health. 5 

This must be a relation of the Brigadier- 
General Luke Lillingston who was the second 
husband of Catherine Hassell, if not he himself 
(see Hassell Notes on page 253). The Lilling- 
stons were a Ferriby family and the church at 
Ferriby (near Hull) contains their monuments. 
A later Lillingston married an Innes heiress 
of Balmacara, Ross-shire, who was a cousin of 
the present writer’s father : so small is this 
big world ! 

Elizabeth continues : ‘ The people most 

talked of for Commissioners to America are 
Mr. Poltney, Eaden & Jackson. They are 
thought very proper. Lord Carlisle is not to 
go. This day y e Lords take into consideration 
Lord North’s conciliatory propositions. . . .’ 

The Bosvilles seem to have gone regularly to 
London; one so wishes Diana had kept a 
Journal and left it behind her ! They seem 
to have gone much into society, especially 
after 1770, when Julia apparently was about 


152 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

seventeen. A relic of this time remains at Thorpe, 
but with merely the tradition that ‘ it was given 
to an ancestor by Queen Charlotte.’ It is a 
snuffbox made of a mother-of-pearl shell very 
gracefully mounted in silver gilt and with a 
crown in high relief lying upon its lid. It still 
contains some snuff ! 

Other letters preserved by Diana from her 
relations still at Thorpe are some from her 
Aunt Isabella Blackett (her mother’s sister), 
who married, as his second wife, the ninth Earl 
of Buchan. They are very affectionate epistles 
but not quite so animated as these written by 
her niece Elizabeth. Their spelling is not 
immaculate ! The person, other than family, 
mentioned with most interest is a Sir Thomas 
Robinson, who ‘ makes his respects to Lady 
Carnarvon.’ ‘ His assiduity,’ we are told, 

‘ is great but his Success (I believe) will end 
in nothing. Venus smiles not on him for 
he has more than once been an unfortunate 
Lover; if he fails of his fair Marchiness, he is 
to go Governer of Barbados, this he says him¬ 
self, therefor I sopose ’tis true.’ This letter is 
dated from London, July 30,1741. On Decem¬ 
ber 4 she writes: ‘ Sir Th os Robinson is 

intirley discarded by his fair Marcheness, wh. 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 153 


he does not bare with any patience, however he 
makes himself merry, for his Balls for people 
of Quality goes on as usual. I hear y e Dutchess 
of Beauford is to take his house if he goes to 
Barbadoes.’ And finally we are told : 4 Sir 
Th os Robinson embarqus very soon for Bar¬ 
badoes, now it draws near his noble spirits are 
sadly cast down and he is become quite a 
melancholy unhappy Creature, he says he is 
sure he shall dye there and never see his friends 
in England more.’ 

This 4 Aunt Blackett ’ tells Diana about the 
playhouses and the opera too, and she says : 
4 The town is at present [July 1741] extremely 
thin and excessive hot y e Diversions are as 
usual Park Vauxhall &c., but y e most company 
is at Capers Gardens, a place come lately into 
fashion where there is fine fire works every 
night. I have not been yet but am to go this 
evening with Lady Carnarvon.’ Remonstrat¬ 
ing in December that her niece does not come to 
London, where she is 4 much asked for, 5 Aunt 
Isabella continues : 4 1 assure you we are ex¬ 
tremely gay and have got operas in great per¬ 
fection, 4 new Italian voices one a prodigiously 
fine one, indeed the others are much admired 
two but I like only y e Cheaf, the Dancers cost 


154 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

£5000, there is a vast number of them & 
entertainment between every act, the princible 
man and woman are very extraordinary for 
high capering and the man does most wonder- 
full things as puts y e Audience in pain for him, 
one night he burst a vain in his leg and the 
blood ran down his Stocken, but yet he finished 
his dance and since to prevent ye like accident 
or the mussles starting, he has his legs swathed 
with ribons as tight as they can be drawn, he 
Jumps ye most prodigious height y t ever was 
seen and falls upon one leg, they say he will 
certainly snap the bones which makes people 
uneasy to see him run such hazard. 

6 Mr. Rich is almost undon empty houses 
every night and often dismist and his best 
players gone to Drury Lane where old Cibber 
acted Sir John Brute last night.’ 

There are many letters at Thorpe addressed 
to Godfrey and Diana and their children, but 
only one of hers, from which quotation has 
already been made (see page 124). But there 
are several by her husband Godfrey. The 
earliest of all in date is written to his step¬ 
father from Cambridge on April 12, 1735. The 
address reads : ‘ To Mr Bosvile at Gunthwait 
near Barnsley Yorkshire,’ and the letter is as 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 155 


follows (Godfrey’s age at this date was 
seventeen) :— 

4 Hon’d Sir, —I have begun to learn Algebra 
with Mr. Saunderson and therefore desire that 
my Mother will not expect me down till this 
1 st Quarter is ended, for I must pay, tho’ I 
shou’d not learn : We have been [to] one 
Lecture and have finished Multiplication and 
Reduction, I shou’d be glad to take Oxford in 
my Way, y t I may at least see that happy Place 
—yesterday I rec d y r Kind Letter but removing 
from a Colledge being a thing of the Utmost 
Consequence, I shou’d think three Weeks too 
short a time to consider in ; Oxford is a place 
I never yet saw, neither can I hear an exact 
Ace 1 of it, it wou’d be a lamentable thing if I 
shou’d chuse the worst Colledge, & almost in¬ 
supportable shou’d I wish to return, a thing 
quite Impracticable, so that I shou’d be glad to 
keep this Tearm at Cambridge. 

4 Just Accounts of Colledges are very hard to 
be had, so that I wou’d not trust even my old 
Schoolfellows, for every one speaks well of his 
own Society. I did not desire to go to Edmund’s 
Hall, Halls being (as I hear) in very little repute 
at Oxford and shou’d rather chuse Queen’s 




156 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

Colledge, to which it belongs and of which I 
believe Mr. Hutton was a Member before he 
removed to King’s in Cambridge. The Master 
is very ill. I am sorry to hear of the many 
Calamitys. Inclosed I have sent you my Bill 
which you will think a long one, but considering 
how many things we have not but are obliged 
to pay for, together with the Impositions of the 
Townspeople, it is not extravagant. Most of 
my Schoolfellows at Trinity wear Wrings—Pray 
give my duty to Dear Mother, my love to pretty 
Sister and service where due. I am very much 
surpris’d that you shou’d never have heard any 
other Method of having Money at the Univer¬ 
sity besides begging it of my Tutor ; it is very 
frequent in Cambridge, more so in Oxford, for 
the Scholars to pay for everything themselves, 
& have their Tutor’s bills brought in to them, 
but since you dare not trust me, I shall rest 
contented. What my Allowance shou’d be you 
are the best Judge and I shou’d be glad to be 
oblidg’d to you for it. 

‘ I shou’d be glad also if in your Next, you 
wou’d send me Word what you intend to give 
me, as also in what Station you intend to admit 
me.—I am S r Y r most dutiful son 

‘ Godfrey Bosville.’ 



EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSYILLES 157 

The other letter by this youth, who shows 
such a human desire to grow up and be inde¬ 
pendent, and incidentally to wear a 4 Wring,’ 
and yet who seems most truly a dutiful loving 
son, is dated also from Cambridge, on May 20 
of the same year, 1735. It must be remem¬ 
bered that it was not Godfrey’s own father to 
whom he wrote. That father had died when he 
was quite a little boy, and a few years later his 
mother had married Mr. Hugh Bosville, a kins¬ 
man ; the 4 pretty Sister ’ was Godfrey’s half- 
sister by this second marriage of his mother, 
and is the Mary who became Mrs. Place of 
Green Hammerton, near York. Godfrey, who 
was baptized May 20,1717, was nearly eighteen 
when he penned the following epistle. Both 
this letter and the preceding one are franked by 
4 P. Caxton.’ 

4 Hond. Sir,— Yours I rec d with the bill 
upon Mr. Finch. I have paid Mr. Wrigley, to 
whom yu say I am oblidg’d for my allowance, 
there remains 26= 14= 10 J. Mr. Ardern had 
indeed More, but this contents me very well; 
I wish I had receiv’d it sooner, for then I cou’d 
have sav’d some Impositions which now I shall 
be oblidg’d to pay ; such as Six & Twenty 


158 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

Shillings for a pair of Buckles worth about 18. 
Three & Sixpence for a pair of Studds not worth 
Half a Crown, &c. For the Townspeople, 
knowing our inability to change those places 
oui Tutors use, extort from us in the things we 
buy, besides making us pay for these we never 
had. I am sorry to hear of Mrs. Herring’s 
Condition. I believe in my letter to my 
Mother I let you know of ye loss of my Room ; 
a Chum i.e. mine is not quite so inconvenient 
as I imagin d, however a single Room is far 
better, neither is mine so convenient as I cou’d 
wish. The fellow-Commoners in Cambridge 
are very much respected and thought fit Com- 
pany for the Heads of the University. I can 
scarce believe that Cambridge is better than 
Oxford, for ye best of my old Schoolfellows go 
to ye latter, at which University the West¬ 
minster Lads have gained a different Character 
from what they have at Cambridge. Mr. 
Ardern was admitted Fellow-Commoner and 
liv’d for a good while in the same Room with 
Mr. Lee, who I heard was going to be married 
to Miss Pepper, sister to a Fellow-Commoner of 
that name in our Colledge ; these three have 
left very good characters behind them, neither 
do I hear of many such as Lord Blaney, who 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 159 


was for w t I can hear, full as bad while he was 
Pensioner. Pray give my Duty to my Mother, 
my love to my Sister & service where due.— 
I am S r your most dutiful Son 

4 Godfrey Bosville. 

4 1 hear Miss Nevil had like to have made an 
elopement with Cornet Lee.’ 

The two next letters in date of this fourth 
Godfrey’s still at Thorpe are both addressed to 
his friend and neighbour at Gunthwaite, John 
Spencer of Cannon Hall 4 near Wakefield.’ This 
Mr. Spencer died unmarried in 1775, aged only 
fifty-seven, when the Spencers became extinct; 
but Mr. Spencer’s sister Ann married Mr. Stan¬ 
hope and their descendants hold Cannon Hall. 
The eldest son of this couple, Walter Spencer 
Stanhope, kept a diary, and in its pages the 
name of Bosville occurs frequently, especially 
when he was in London ; for instance, under 
February 10, 1779 : 4 Dined at Bolton House, 
went to Mrs. Bosville’s and Almack.’ Another 
sister of Mr. John Spencer was Alicia Maria, 
called Almary, who married Mr. Greame of 
Sewerby, and from whose letters to her relations 
at Cannon Hall quotation has already been 
made. 


160 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


The fourth Godfrey’s writing, even when a 
boy at Cambridge and still more later, has a 
very clear and determined look; both it and 
the text of the letters are very characteristic 
of what we believe the writer to have been—a 
man orderly, conscientious, kind and just, fond 
of good things, hospitable and enjoying a joke. 
The first of the two letters to Mr. John Spencer 
is dated from London, January 28, 1765. Here 
it is :— 


4 Dear Sir,— You set out this morning as 
they tell me and a Barrel of Oisters sets out at 
the same time, but Oisters are a kind of Shell¬ 
fish that are not made for travelling fast and 
therefore you will beat them in hollow to 
Cannon hall : I hope they will prove good ones, 
if not, I desire that you will let me know, that 
I may catechise the Fishmonger; if Mrs. 
Hustler had not wrote me word that she re¬ 
ceiv’d but four woodcocks I shoud always have 
supposd she had got seaven, the number I 
sent, but as she made it known to me, I got 
the price of them refunded. Lord Byron 
killed Mr. Chaworth last Saturday at the Star 
and Garter in Pall Mall, they disputed about 
which had the most Game upon his Estate till 



EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 161 


at last one told the other he ly’d, they went 
into another room & decided it with Swords ; 
there were above a dozen people in the Room, 
for it was a Nottinghamshire meeting, and yet 
nobody perceivd their going out. You know 
L d Byron has been a good deal reflected on for 
want of Courage, which might probably induce 
Mr. Chaworth who they say was a strong Stout 
man to treat his Lordship very cavalierly ; if 
he was forcd to fight, either by a Challenge or 
such Usage as he coud not pass by with 11 being 
contemptible, I think he did Right when he 
did go out, to make a duel stand for something 
and push home ; had he been worsted he w d 
have been more reflected on, they woud have 
said that like Nym in the Play, he winkd, and 
held out his Iron. I suppose he will be tryd 
in Westminster hall by the whole House, 
because L d Ferrers was, though twelve peers 
might try for anything but Treason. [This 
Lord Byron was the third, and the grand-uncle 
of the poet—who himself suffered at the hands 
of the Chaworth family, for in the little oriel 
room off the drawing-room at Annesley, Mary 
Chaworth definitely refused his offer of mar¬ 
riage. She married another neighbour, Mr. 
Musters.] The best furniture in Mr. Wildman’s 

L 



162 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

Great Room his Coterie is dissolvd into 
Nothing ; some of their speeches are flying 
about in the House of Commons directly in 
Contradiction to what they have been talking 
at their Club—oh ! Grief of Griefs ! as Mr. 
Kilgel says, where is Modesty flown to ? As 
to Change of Sentiments and Opinions, Opinions 
have nothing to do with it. Is a Lawyer never 
to make a Speech with* being of 0])inion with 
the man that fees him ? Are the solid argu¬ 
ments Charles Townsend gives, his Opinion ? 
Because he has given as solid Arguments 
against them ? Or is it that silent Argument 
his Place ? (sic). 

4 You have Gardens to walk in, and Hounds 
to ride after, and Books to read when you are 
so inclind. We here go to Public places; but 
though we do, it is but a public life in appear¬ 
ance, for everybody’s conversation is in a 
manner confind within the Compass of a few 
particular Acquaintance. 

4 The Nobility hold themselves as contami¬ 
nated with the Commons: you seldom see a Lord 
& a private Gentleman together : I know a 
Lady, made so by Marriage, who denys herself 
on Sundays to the Nobility & is at home to 
everybody else, which favor they are not to 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 163 


expect but upon the Lord’s Day : by which 
smugling of her small Acquaintance she keeps 
that nice division between Lords and Gentle¬ 
men unjumbled together. An American Indian 
that saw a Regiment of foot drawn up, might 
think the Officers & Soldiers mighty sociable. 
Just so is the Company at Soho Square, all 
together and all distinct. Dancing is almost 
out of fashion : they dance no Minuets at all, 
and Country Dances are performed by never 
more than ten Couple; out of all that Number. 
I have bought the two new Volumes of that 
dealer in Sermons & Bawdy Tristram Shandy : 
I think he writes everything that comes into 
his head. The new Play of the Platonic wife 
is disliked, but why may not a Lady write a 
Bawdy Play as well as a Parson write a Bawdy 
Book ? What shall we come to ? When a 
Frenchwoman attempted to ravish, at least to 
force her way up to Tenducci who carries 
nothing Bawdy ab* him & snapt a Pistol at 
Robinson’s Apprentice for hindering her ? Love 
and Murder.—I am Dear Sir Your most obedi¬ 
ent Servant Godfrey Bosville.’ 

The other letter is equally interesting, and 
also begins about ‘ Oisters,’ of which Mr. 



164 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


Spencer must have been very fond ! It, too, 
was written in London, but two years later 
than the other one, being dated March 24, 1767. 

4 Dear Sir ’ (it begins),— 4 Though I know 
you have Oisters enough for all ... I coud 
think of nothing else to send you to recollect 
an old Acquaintance by, but a Barrel. I have 
had ill luck with my presents. I once sent 
some Partridges & woodcocks to Mrs. Bos- 
ville when she was at London with her Niece, 
she happend to be gone & Mrs. Hunt woud 
not use them, but sent them after her into 
Staffordsh. where they had plenty, & they 
must have been like most of our English 
Nobility, not much the better for travelling. 
I gave Mrs. Bosville’s Soho Square Ticket to 
Miss Eld last Wednesday, on Thursday she sent 
it back again & chose rather to go the next 
time. I sent it again & let her know Mrs. 
Bosville woud be back before then : but she 
returnd it me & as it was the very day I 
coud not offer it to a fresh Person, it would 
look so like a make shift, therefore I sent it 
to the Lady who had my daughters, & woud 
have had that . . . [paper torn] very glad I 
was to get any body that woud take it. 



EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 165 


4 1 hope you will eat your Oisters. Mrs. Bos- 
ville and my Daughter are going to Bath, prin¬ 
cipally to see Mrs Wentworth, who declines 
very much. The Marquis of Tavistock has had 
a bad accident: there is a Hunt where many 
of the Nobility & Gentry go to near S 1 Albans, 
it was formerly at Dunstable, perhaps you may 
have been amongst them, Lord Tavistock took 
a leap which his horse did not clear but threw 
him & whether he kickd him out of Yiciousness 
afterwards, or his legs being fastened in the 
Bindings he plungd & so gave him a Stroke, I 
do not know, but he has fractured his Skull, 
his Lordship is at a farm house where he was 
trepanned, the Duke of Bedford has been 
almost out of his Sences & woud have gone 
down but Gataker the Apothecary desird he 
woud not. Lord Tavistock was better yester¬ 
day, but last night he had a bad night, his Lady 
knows of it, but the thing has been kept out 
of the Paper & the Marquis is at a farm house 
about seaven miles on this side St Albans : he 
was a Bold Rider & I am sorry for it, he had a 
good Character, by all accounts I am afraid he 
will dye. William . . . day & spends most of 
his time with me & I do assure you we drank 
your Health in a Bumper this very day. It is 


166 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

always an amusement to me to have a Letter 
from our neighbourhood, if it is but to let me 
know your Trees grow well as they are an 
ornament to our Country, it woud please me. 
The Oisters I sent to Phipps I had from a 
different Fishmonger, I cannot guess which 
will be the best, my motto, you know is try & 
trust, therefore let me know what they really 
are. If both of them please, I shall be pleasd 
too, but if neither of them is good it will be 
great Mortification to, Dear Sir, Your most 
Obedient Servant, 

4 Godfrey Bosville. 

4 Tom Marsden is in Town, I saw him this 
morning with S r Rich d Betterson.’ 

The poor Lord Tavistock of whose accident 
this letter tells, died of it, to the intense grief 
both of his father, the Duke of Bedford, and of 
his wife, a daughter of Lord Albemarle. Indeed, 
she never recovered the shock, and died of grief 
not long afterwards. She left two sons, later 
fifth and sixth Dukes of Bedford. 

Another of this fourth Godfrey’s letters, also 
addressed to John Spencer, is now unfortunately 
lost, but is printed by Mrs. Stirling in her Annals 
of a Yorkshire House. It is so charming that it 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 167 


must be quoted here also. It is dated January 
1, 1773, and its original inspiration is again 
4 Oisters, 5 which were evidently a favourite New 
Year’s gift. Godfrey writes :— 

4 Dear Sir,— On Tuesday y e 29. of last 
Year a Barrell of Oisters sett out for you, 
which I hope will come sweet and good. The 
town seems to be emptier than I ever remember 
it at this time of y e year, I suppose in ab 1 a 
Fortnight we may expect Company & bad 
weather coming all together. I shall think my¬ 
self very happy in not having crowded Inns, 
bad Roads & Floods to pass through. 

4 Rhodes writes me word you have sent me 
twenty Fish. I’m much obligd to you for 
them, it is a good thing to live in a good neigh¬ 
bourhood. 

4 There is one Captain Cartwright, his brother 
lives at Marnham, who has brought five Esqui¬ 
maux, two Men, two Women & a Child, one of 
y e Men is a Priest: they are little round Broad¬ 
faced things, very like y e Pictures of them & 
y e Greenlanders, which will give me more 
Historical faith in y e Pictures & Books of 
Voyages. Y e Child is really a very pretty one 
& ye Mother stuffs it into a kind of a Hood 



168 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

made to their Dress, like a Capuchin. They 
seem very Goodnaturd & are clothd in Seal¬ 
skins. The Captain has settled himself among 
them to carry on a Trade & has brought them 
here to give them a Notion of y e Power of y* 
English, for they think th r own ye greatest 
Nation in ye World, having seen no other, tho’ 
they are not more populous than the country 
ab* Woodhead. 

4 Y e Weather continues very fine & I see 
Mrs. Capper’s forty Cows dancing Fandangoes. 
If you had them at Cannonhall they woud turn 
y e Tables & sett y e dumb Orpheus a-fiddling. 

4 In ye new Building Act & Clause Mr. Frere- 
ton sent, was left out w ch is for Liverpool & 
every Place where he had to do, y t wherever ye 
Parish Engine was kept, there shoud be two or 
three ladders kept, long enough to reach to ye 
top of y e highest House & a small Reward for 
whoever brings y e first & second. 

4 Mr. Foote applied for a License to keep a 
Poppet Show. They were to have been as big 
as y e Life & one of them like Mr. Garrick. He 
himself intended to have taken y e Benefit of 
pars pro toto & crypt in among his wooden 
companions by means of his leg. At first his 
Scheme was listend to but there have been such 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 169 


strong remonstrances from both Playhouses y t 
he is at last refused. Why shou’d our Diver¬ 
sions be monopoliz’d ? The Law to restrain 
y e Number of Playhouses was a very absurd 
one & only takes place in London, for y e 
Country is full of them. 

6 Billy borrow’d a reflecting Telescope of 
young Tommy Cockshutt, & last night we look’d 
at Venus, Jupiter & y e Moon. It is astonishing 
yi ye Art of Mankind w ch cannot make Sight can 
improve it to such a Degree ! Mr. Short has 
made two Telescopes w ch y e King of Spain & 
D. of Marlborough have got, y t carry y e Sight 
far beyond w 4 Sir Isaac Newton thought, who 
imagin’d it w d magnify y e Atmosphere. He 
thinks he cou’d make one y* w d show any 
Building as big as Cannon hall, or even a Man 
in y e Moon ; probably they are differently made 
from w t we are. 

4 The Moon hath such an influence, both at 
our Birth & at our Death y* it is very likely y* 
we either came from thence, or go thither. 
This Star-gazing may hasten my Departure 
into one of these Planets ; if I go into ye Moon 
I will bespeak a Cabbin or Rock for you to be 
near me !—but perhaps they have Property & 
then you must contrive to be born ag n a 



170 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

Gentleman. The Clergy will tell us we shall be 
putt into y e great Furnace underground, of 
w ch Etna, Vesuvius, Stromboli & Hecla are y e 
Chimneys. Never heed ; we shall be turn’d 
then into Camelions & burning will not hurt us. 

6 Once more I wish you your Health & am 
dear Sir. Your most ob* Servant, 

6 Godfrey Bosville.’ 

The only other letters from Godfrey Bosville’s 
pen, at Thorpe, are mere fragments, but two 
may be quoted, as each is full of a different 
interest. The first concerns a curious plan to 
prevent worms from attacking wooden ships. 
It is as follows :— 

4 Thorp, 21st AuK 1779. 

4 Sir, —I have sent you two nails as patterns by 
Mr. Cockshutt’s directions & have order’d five 
hundred of each sort, half a Tun, to be sent to 
Hull as directed for Ellis our Pier Master : it 
is to make a Tryal with ; they are to fill Planks 
with nails to keep out the Worm. I have acted 
once as Commissioner & finding they had their 
nails from Hull which came from Rotherham, 
I told them, I woud write to a friend at the 
fountain head, & I was sure they woud have 
them cheaper from there. Mr. Cockshutt’s 



EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 171 


answer is, that the Commissioners may certainly 
be supplyd cheaper from hence than from Hull 
as the Dealers there must have nails from this 
Country & sell to some Profit (a very moderate 
one in this Article) I believe generally less than 
five per Cent. You call the nails sheathing, 
but your description does not agree with what 
we call by that name (I have sent you such as 
Ellis gave me) & I cannot tell you the price 
exactly without seeing two or three of the nails ; 
from what you say I believe the larger nails will 
cost 27/6 or 28/ shillings and the smaller from 
29/ to 30/ the hundredweight. It is probable 
some Tuns may be wanted, in which case I 
shou’d be very glad to supply the Commis¬ 
sioners, for nails are at this time in no great 
demand. If only a few Bags be wanted, the 
difference between my price as a Manufacturer 
& that of a whole Sale dealer at Hull will be 
scarcely worth the attention of the Commis¬ 
sioners (this is only for a Tryal, if it succeeds, 
more will be wanted). 

4 If you think anything more likely to be 
done in this business, I will beg the favor of 
you to take an opportunity to send two or 
three of each sort to Mr. Standfords at Scar¬ 
brough who will forward them to me ; I can 


172 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


then tell you the exact price. It will be neces¬ 
sary for me to know about what Quantity may 
be wanted & the time they will be requir’d. 
Please to let him know' when you w r rite that 
the half tun I have orderd is only for a tryal & 
that if it succeeds more will be wanted, but 
how many I cannot say.—I am Sir Your most 
Humble Servant 

‘ Godfrey Bosville.’ 

To this letter no name and no address is 
appended. It is surprising to see the Lord of 
Gunthwaite and Thorpe describe himself as a 
manufacturer. Probably an explanation may 
be found in the fact that at Hoyland Swein, 
close to Gunthwaite, nails have been made for 
a very long time, and probably Godfrey had an 
interest in this industry. 

The next letter is much more amusing, but, 
sad to say, is incomplete, and the name of the 
4 Dear Sir ’ to w r hom it is addressed is absent. 
The date, however, is there, 4 Sept r 1783,’ and 
the letter was w'ritten at 4 Thorp near Malton.’ 
It runs as follows :— 

4 We are oblidgd to you for your present; 
there never was a Turtle at Thorp before, and 
I had the pleasure of producing to my Neigh- 



EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 173 


hours in this Country, an Entertainment from 
beyond the Atlantic, and showing them, that 
I had friends of my own name on the other side 
the Pole. It came by sea from London to 
Bridlington, a convenience I coud not have in 
my former habitation, where fish must come, 
not by water but land ; we happend to have 
a Cook that was usd to dress them & we had 
not the Shell turned into a Boat, but stewd down 
and made like the Green fat, as I had it done in 
London; it proved an exceeding good one, though 
not the same that you sent, for that died in the 
passage, but your Correspondent Mr. Hall did 
me the favor to send us one of his to repair our 
loss ; it weighed Ninety-six pounds, but I am as 
much oblidgd to you as if I had receivd that of 
One Hundred and Twenty as you intended me, 
for its safe arrival was not in your power. 

4 Sir Thomas Blacket is in Northumberland 
but his two daughters are here. Thomas is in 
France but William is got back to London. 

4 You can have much more varietv of Climate 

•/ 

in Jamaica than we have here ; you have ex¬ 
cessive heats upon the sea coast, but you have 
Cold enough among the Blue Mountains & you 
may go up them as high as you please & stop 
at that climate which you like the best; you 


174 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

ma y S° from the South of France into Norway 
in your own Island : though ours is so much 
larger, we have not the same variety in it, we 
are very deficient in warmth. 

4 I shoud not like to live among the Saints of 
New England, the sly Quakers of Pensilvania 
or the cruel Enthusiasts of Portugal; their 
Religions are founded in Cookery, dress, & 
contradiction : Cookery has more to do in 
Religion than Morality, it directs the Maho¬ 
metans Jews & Gentoos : Doctor Russell, who 
was born at Aleppo, where his father was 
Phisitian told me that Wine was a great Anti¬ 
dote of Corruption, & that the Christians seldom 
had the Plague ; the bad Turks, who drank it 
privately, very rarely, but the good ones that 
abstained died by dozens. . . .’ 

The mention above of Sir Thomas Blackett 
is the very last that the letters in Thorpe Hall 
yield ; but an old cutting, probably from a 
number of the Gentleman's Magazine , has been 
preserved among them, and there we read the 
following notice in the July 4 Obituary of Con¬ 
siderable persons ’ :— 

4 At his seat, Bretton-hall, near Wakefield, 
Sir Thomas Blackett, bart., who in the year 


EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 175 

1777 succeeded to all the valuable entailed 
estates, royalties & c of Lady Blackett, wife of 
the late Sir Walter B. bart., of Newcastle. The 
manner in which he has settled his immense 
property, which, including the mines, produce 
from 30 to 40,000/ per annum, is as follows :— 
The Yorkshire and the greater part of the 
Northumberland estates are entailed on his 
daughters, Mrs. Beaumont, Mrs. Lee and Miss 
Louisa Wentworth and their issue male with 
remainder to Sir John Sinclair, bart and his 
heirs by the Hon: Lady Sinclair, Sir Thomas’s 
greatniece, daughter of Lord Macdonald and 
their heirs and assigns. 

6 The Gunnerton Estate, worth about 3,500/. 
per annum is left to W m Bosville Esq r of Gun- 
thwaite, his nephew. [A map of this Gunner- 
ton estate is at Thorpe.] 

4 Mrs. Lee and Miss Wentworth have each a 
rent-charge on the estate of 3000/. per annum. 
There are also considerable sums of money 
bequeathed to them and several annuities to 
Mrs. Bosville.’ 

It seems strange that Sir Thomas never 
married the mother of these daughters. Her 
name is believed to have been Wordsworth. 



176 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


The fragment of letter last quoted shows that 
some Bosville relation lived in Jamaica in 1783, 
but nothing is known of such an one. 

Just one more scrap of writing in the fourth 
Godfrey’s firm handwriting has yet to be tran¬ 
scribed : it is a somewhat grim request left by 
him and still preserved in his old home ; one 
can imagine him penning it with much satis¬ 
faction and probably with a bit of a chuckle, 
and yet being quite in earnest about what he 
wished done. We have no record that posterity 
carried out his directions ! This is what he 
wrote and left to be found after he had begun 
that journey which he once suggested might be 
to the moon :— 

6 When I am dead I woud have my Body 
opend, and my Lungs examind : for I have had 
a Cough a long time ; It may possibly be a 
Benefit to Mankind, but chiefly to my Posterity, 
as they may probably inherit any Ailment of 
their Ancestor, and will secure me from being 
buryd alive, which I am satisfyd many are ; 
and they must be Certain it cannot hurt a dead 
Body. If I leave no Posterity, but my Chil¬ 
dren dye before me, I ask not this favour of 
Strangers, who will probably be in too great 



\ 

EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSVILLES 177 

a hurry to get me underground, and enjoy my 
Estate, to trouble their heads much about the 
Remains of Godfrey Bosville.’ 

The death of Godfrey Bosville, fourth of that 
name, took place in Great Russell Street, 
London, on January 25, 1784, at the age of 
sixty-six. He had seen many changes in his 
day and led a useful, honourable life. His 
name in 1745 is among the subscribers 4 for 
the Defence of the Country 5 —the sum he gave 
was £25. Like the other members of his family, 
he seems to have had very liberal ideas, and it 
is disappointing t o find no reflections of his on 
the American War. He was eager to observe 
and note any new finding in Science or Natural 
History, and was greatly interested over the 
idea that his land at Gunthwaite contained 
silver ore. But nothing much came of the 
search for this. We owe any knowledge of 
this search to the notes of Mr. Wilson of Broom- 
head, whose MS. notes on the subject are in 
the British Museum (Add. MS. 24472, p. 48). 
He says that 4 in August 1770, one Mr. Spottis- 
woode an Attorney, grandson of the Spottis- 
woode who wrote the History of Scotland and 
some others from London, obtained a grant 


M 


178 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


from the Crown for leave to search for Silver 
Mines. They began to work on a place called 
Gadding Moor, near to the water side near 
Gunth waite Lane End. A pound of the silver 
ore was said to produce 8 oz: of silver. It was 
first found out in building a house there in 1731. 
It is said one Butterworth of Cawthorne, made 
a pair of Buckles of it. They also opened 
another mine at Woolley—Great Expectations, 
but came to nothing.’ 

Godfrey Bosville was buried in the Church 
of St. Giles-in-the-Field. Diana his wife did 
not follow him until eleven years later, in 1795, 
when she died and was buried at Bath. It 
seems sad that neither lie near Yorkshire, and 
that they, who were always together in life, are 
so far apart in their earthly resting-places. 
Their youthful portraits at Thorpe, however, 
show them side by side looking contented and 
happy and in the lovely setting of Diana’s early 
home at Bretton. 

The following quotation is from a contempor¬ 
ary number of The Sun newspaper :— 

6 On Sunday morning died at his house in 
Great Russell-street Bloomsbury, aged sixty- 
six, Godfrey Bosville Esq r of Thorpe and Gun- 



EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY BOSYILLES 179 

thwaite in Yorkshire. To those who are so 
fortunate as to have been acquainted with him, 
no eulogy is necessary, as they know his worth 
full well; but to those who had not that very 
good fortune, we hope it will suffice to say that 
he was that noblest work of God—i.e. an honest 
man ; as also a good and indulgent husband, 
a kind and affectionate parent. God’s peace 
be with him.’ 


CHAPTER X 


FASHION AND GENIUS—EIGHTEENTH CENTURY 

The following letters are among those which 
gave most pleasure in their discovery. The 
first of them serves to show the immense differ¬ 
ence in the ways of fashion between modern- 
day manners and those which obtained in the 
courtly eighteenth century. It is addressed to 
Miss Bosville (Julia) and has been sent by 
hand. It is dated May 20 merely, from Gros- 
venor Street, but must belong to 1773 or 1774. 
The writer is Neil, third Earl of Rosebery. The 
letter speaks for itself :— 

4 Lord Rosebery Presents his Compliments to 
Miss Bosville, begs she will excuse the Liberty 
he takes in offering her a Ticket To a Subscrip¬ 
tion Ball that is to be held at Allmacks on 
Wednesday First. It is out of his Power to 
procure her Two—which he endeavourd at & 

was the Reason that prevented him from send- 
180 




FASHION AND GENIUS 


181 


ing on Saturday. It is true his Subscription 
Entitles him to Another Ticket but It was 
engagd to Lady Francis Bennet from the 
Beginning. Lord R. is so particular with this 
Account, to shew, that it was not in his power 
to do otherwayes; and in hopes that Some of 
her Acquaintances are going there he now sends 
to inform her, that it is at her Service if she 
will do him the Honor to Accept of it, and 
which he will be obliged to her if she will be 
so good as inform him of Tomorrow or as soon 
as she has inquired among her acquaintance, if 
any of them go that she would Chuse to accom¬ 
pany. Miss Bosville may be assured that it 
will be one of the best & most Elegant Sub¬ 
scription Balls that has been Given, as it is by 
60 of the first Men of Fashion in Town. That 
the Ticket is to be marked with the Lady's 
Name, who it is to Admitt, prevents him from 
being able to send her The Ticket till he knows 
her Resolution which he begs may not be 
Sudden, unless it be That she will go—for tho 5 
Miss Bosville may imagine that None of her 
Friends are going, she will probably find it 
Otherwise—especially if she is going to Rane- 
laugh tonight, where she must have a Bettar 
opportunity of inquiring Than anywhere else 



182 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


& where he hopes to hear from Miss Bosville, 
That she is Resolved for The Ball. 

4 Grosvener Street, 

4 Monday , 30 May 

The missive is sealed with Lord Rosebery’s 
signet ring. 

As no year is given, and no other trace of 
this ball found among the letters, we shall never 
know whether or not the lady 4 Resolved to Go ! ’ 

Who, on reading the above letter, would sup¬ 
pose that a ticket for 4 Allmack’s ’ (that enter¬ 
prising Scot, M 4 Call by name, who turned his 
name round to use it for his 4 Rooms ’) was then 
one of the most coveted prizes in the whole 
London season ? 

The other letter is from an acknowledged 
man of genius, no other than the celebrated 
4 Bozzy,’ James Boswell, whose book about 
Dr. Johnson is so celebrated. We have already 
seen that he, quite justly, claimed kinship with 
the Yorkshire Bosvilles and called Godfrey his 
Chief; and that there is at Thorpe a copy of his 
History of Corsica given by him and inscribed to 
this 4 chief.’ His letter is written from Edin¬ 
burgh, where Godfrey’s second son Thomas had 
evidently been with him. It is addressed to 


FASHION AND GENIUS 


183 


6 Godfrey Bosville Esq. of Gunthwaite, Great 
Russel Street, Bloomsbury, London, 5 and dated 
c 13 March 1780.’ It runs :— 

6 Dear Sir, —Your last kind letter was a 
refreshment to my spirits in this northern 
desart, for so it is to me who loves London as 
I do. Your son Captain Thomas said he would 
rather be the smallest man in London than the 
greatest in Edinburgh. So much does he differ 
from Caesar who wished to be rather “ Primus 
Mantuae quam secundus Romae.” I almost 
agree with my cousin. My Father was very 
sorry that an illness prevented his seeing him. 
I took care, however, that Lord Monboddo who 
has such an enthusiasm for Patagonions, and 
thinks that men are most wretchedly dwindled 
in their size, should dine with Thomas at my 
house ; and when I introduced him, I said, 
66 This, my Lord, is the proper size of our Clan 
when you see us in perfection. 55 [Thomas 
Bosville’s height was 6 feet 4 inches.] I hope 
he has been well since he returned to you. As 
our Court of Sessions was sitting while he was 
here, I could not see him as much as I wished 
to do. My Father has been pretty well since 
he recovered from a fever which he had. His 


184 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

spiiits, to be sure, are not so good as they once 
were. I have secured for Mrs. Bosville his 
own edition of the Quaker’s letter, which is 
indeed better than the original, though it is 
very well. 

You will be satisfied now with our opera¬ 
tions at Sea. If we could go on at this rate, 
the Trade of War would I fancy be profitable 
to us. Where is your eldest son ? I hope he 
will not quite disdain or hate his native land 
and climate. My bz'other David who has been 
twelve years in Spain is to come home soon. I 
hope he is by this time at Paris. When he 
comes to London he will wait upon you. He 
wishes to settle there as a merchant in one way 
or other. I am not without fear that the 
delightful warmth of Valencia may make him 
dislike this Island. W e must do what we can 
to reconcile him to it. I shall not be in London 
this Spring. I have no cause before the House 
of Lords, and to tell you the truth, now that 
my young family are getting up, I find the 
£300 which my Father allows me together with 
my fees as a Lawyer will not do. I am un¬ 
willing to apply to my Father, as he might 
think me extravagant and be alarmed. Could 
you, my Chief, conveniently let me have a loan 


FASHION AND GENIUS 


185 


of two or one hundred pounds for a few years 
without mentioning it but to your own family, 
it would be an essential kindness. I would 
draw on you for the money and send you my 
bill. I do not think your risk would be great. 

4 My Wife joins me in best compliments to 
all the good family in Great Russel Street. 
How do you like your neighbour Beauclerc ?— 
I am, Dear Sir, Your affectionate Kinsman, 

4 James Boswell.’ 

One hopes poor overburdened Bozzy’s request 
was granted ; but there is no more about him, 
and we must now return to the Bosvilles 
themselves. 



CHAPTER XI 


THE LAST OF THE BOSVILLES— 

INTO THE NINETEENTH CENTURY 

When the fourth Godfrey Bosville passed away 

all his four children were alive and well. Lady 

Macdonald may have been delicate, for she died 

in 1789, but the two sons were in the prime of 

life. Neither was married, but Thomas took 

a wife about ten years later, and no one would 

then have expected that he and his elder brother 

Billy were to be the Last of the Bosvilles. But 

Thomas was slain at Liencelles in 1793, leaving- 

no child ; and William never married. He was 

the (XXII.) head of his family, and seems to 

have been very clever, if rather eccentric. In 

his youth he visited France and Italy, and it 

must be his passport which still lies at Thorpe, 

signed by Louis xvi. and his minister De 

Vergennes in 1778 at Paris. In this he is 

called ‘ le Sieur Bosville allant en Italie.’ But 

it must be a much later one than his first 

journey required. We get a peep of him 
186 


THE LAST OF THE BOSVILLES 187 


abroad as early as 1767, in a letter of Lord 
Balcarres, published in The Lives of the Lind¬ 
says , where we read : 4 In 1767 I received my 
Ensigncy in the 53 rd Reg t under the command 
of L* Colonel Lindsay of that Regiment and 
under his tutelage I embarked in the iEolus 
for Gibraltar. We were to take up at Lisbon 
Major Hawke, a son of the great Lord Hawke, 
and Ensign Bosville, afterwards the famous 
Republican.’ Major Hawke was a friend of 
4 Billy,’ and the two must have been on their 
way to Africa, where they formed part of the 
suite of an English Embassy sent out to 
Morocco to felicitate the Emperor of that 
country upon his accession to the throne. 
Billy had been educated at Cheam and Harrow, 
and early in life (1760) obtained a commission 
in the Coldstream Guards. Later he went with 
his regiment to America, where he remained 
during the whole time of the War of Inde¬ 
pendence, and where, no doubt, he imbibed his 
4 Republican ’ sentiments. He never cared for 
country life, but lived chiefly in his house at 
Welbeck Street in London. Here he saw his 
friends, many of whom also visited him at 
Thorpe; for instance, John Wilkes, who fought 
so successfully for the freedom of the British 


188 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

Press. Tom Payne, who has been called the 
Father of English Radicalism, was another of 
his friends, and he has left his portrait at 
Thorpe, where it is labelled in the Catalogue of 
Pictures as ‘ Tom Payne the Atheist.’ William 
became, in fact, the recognised leader of a set 
of bold spirits who w r ere eager to procure full 
liberty and progress for all British subjects. 
Sir Francis Burdett was one of this circle, as 
were also William Cobbett (letters of his are at 
Thorpe, but they are not very edifying !) and 
Horne Tooke. The latter mentions his friend 
in his book, Diversions of Purley (vol. ii. page 
490), where he writes : 4 Bosville and I have 
entered into a strict engagement to belong for 
ever to the Established Government, to the 
Established Church and to the established 
language of our Country : because they are 
established. Establish what you please, no ; 
but Establish ; and while that establishment 
shall last, we shall be perfectly convinced of 
its propriety.’ These gentlemen had evidently 
taken to heart Pope’s line, 4 Whatever is, is 
Right.’ Surely in no other age could such 
sentiments be termed liberal. William Bos- 
ville’s Republican tastes must have been 
strengthened by a visit which he paid to Paris 


THE LAST OF THE BOSVILLES 189 


in 1793, four years after the Fall of the Bastille 
and just when Louis xvi. and Marie Antoinette 
were losing their lives and crown under the 
guillotine. No doubt, too, at such a time of 
confusion and terror any fixed 6 Establishment 5 
must have seemed desirable, no matter of what 
kind. 

When in London, William Bosville used to dine 
every Sunday with Horne Tooke; Mr. Stephens, 
in his life of that worthy (Memoirs of John Horne 
Tooke , vol. ii. page 308), says of him : 4 William 
Bosville never attained a higher rank than that 
of Lieutenant in the Guards, which is equal to 
a Captain in the line ; but the courtesy of the 
public assigned to him the brevet of a Colonel, 
by which appellation he was more generally 
distinguished by his friends, than any other.’ 
Mr. Stephens goes on to say that Mr. Bosville’s 
manners were gentle, his conduct uniformly 
polite, and his natural disposition generous and 
obliging. When in town, he kept open table 
for his friends, whom he treated with the 
utmost liberality. Being often abused by 
writers, he once said, 4 1 hope these gentlemen 
are in good credit with their printers, for the 
world will think me of no consequence the 
moment they leave off abusing me.’ When 


190 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

William Cobbett was in Newgate prison, Colonel 
Bosville went in state, with four horses to his 
carriage, to visit him, and afterwards presented 
him with £1000, in token of sympathy, he said, 
with a persecuted sufferer. According to the 
account of his grand-nephew, the Rev. John 
Sinclair, in the memoirs of his father Sir John 
Sinclair, Mr. Bosville shone as an eccentric 
habitue of London during a large part of the 
reign of George in. In 1788 Sir John Sinclair 
took a leading part in the formation of the 
‘ African Club,’ and of this club Mr. Bosville 
was unanimously elected a member. ‘ My 
Grand Uncle’s exterior,’ says Mr. Sinclair, 
‘ consisted of the single breasted coat, powdered 
hair and queue and other paraphernalia of a 
courtier in the reign of George m.; but within 
this courtly garb was enclosed one of the most 
ultra-liberal spirits of the time.’ His hospit¬ 
ality was unbounded; for he allowed for the 
dinner-table alone £3000 a year. In his house 
in Welbeck Street every day a party of con¬ 
genial souls assembled ; these never exceeded 
twelve in number, nor were admitted a single 
moment late. Had any one ventured to say, 

‘ Better late than never,’ Mr. Bosville would 
have retorted with his favourite phrase, ‘ I say, 


THE LAST OF THE BOSVILLES 191 


better never late ! ’ The first stroke of five 
was the signal for going downstairs ; when 
Mr. Friend, the Astronomer Royal, arriving 
half a minute after, met the company on the 
staircase, Mr. Bosville addressed him thus : 
4 I trust, Mr. Friend, you will not fail to bear 
in mind for the future that we don’t reckon 
time here by the meridian of Greenwich, but 
by the meridian of Welbeck Street.’ Even 
Sir Francis Burdett suffered denial at the door 
for lateness. The servants entered into the 
whimsical accuracy of their master, says Mr. 
Sinclair, and when a well-known guest, out of 
breath with haste, one day rang the door-bell 
about four minutes after five o’clock, the foot¬ 
man, looking up from the area, informed him 
that 4 The Colonel has taken the Chair.’ Lord 
Donoughmore, Mr. Este and Captain James 
were of the party every day when in town. A 
slate was kept in the front hall, on which any 
intimate friend—and he had many—might 
inscribe his name as guest for the day. Sir 
Francis Burdett, Lord Hutchinson, Horne 
Tooke, Baron Dimsdale, Lord Oxford, and 
Mr. Clifford (a celebrated barrister) were among 
those who did so. 

Mr. Bosville was a principal figure at the 


192 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

famous Sunday dinners given by Horne Tooke 
in his house at Wimbledon, the cost of which 
was defrayed by Sir Francis Burdett, but Mr. 
Bosville invariably brought with him in his 
carriage two of the most important articles for 
consumption—fish and wine. 

Everywhere he was known as the Champion 
of Freedom and the Rights of Man. He was 
one of Horne Tooke’s chief supporters when he 
unsuccessfully contested Westminster in 1795, 
and the following toast given by him at a 
dinner following the election is an instance of 
his political utterances : 4 Fellow countrymen, 
we have been told from the hustings that we 
are tied to a tree—the tree of corruption. I 
will give you a Toast : Pull, pull and pull again 
with three times three ; security for the future 
and justice in the past; with three times three 
and the birthday of our liberties.’ 

Mr. Bosville also worked hard to help William 
Cobbett in 1806, when Cobbett made his first 
attempt to enter Parliament; and it is certainly 
to Mr. Bosville’s credit that, when persuaded 
that such people as Tooke and Cobbett owned 
the right principles to help their country, he 
neither limited his friendship nor withheld his 
admiration because one was the son of a 









A\ ILLIAM EOSYILLE WITH HIS NEPHEW, CAPTAIN THE 
HON. ARCHIBALD MACDONALD, AND HIS GRAND¬ 
NEPHEW, SIR GEORGE SINCLAIR 


(From the picture at Bretton) 







THE LAST OF THE BOSVILLES 193 


poulterer and the other had been a plough¬ 
man. But one cannot help wishing, that 
instead of talking in London, he had lived upon 
his neglected estates and helped his people by 
so doing. As a fact, he avoided going into 
Yorkshire so as not to be worried by requests 
and affairs. On the whole, in this respect too 
he was a typical Socialist. 

It is amusing to read his opinion of the ways 
of his fashionable sister, Lady Dudley, as 
retailed by Mr. Sinclair : 4 44 1 always,” said 
Mr. Bosville, 44 dine punctually at five ; but 
when I reached Park Lane after six, I com¬ 
monly was forced to wait half an hour before 
my sister returned from her morning drive. 
Not till half past seven did a single soul arrive 
to dinner and I have often heard eight strike 
when we were going downstairs. Feeling 
ashamed to be the only performer while the 
rest were little better than spectators, I gener¬ 
ally rose with an appetite. The fact is, Lady 
Dudley and her friends always dine at three 
o’clock without knowing it. At that hour she 
takes a beefsteak and a glass of Madeira, which 
she chooses to call a luncheon. Finding that 
Lord Dudley’s habits and my own did not 
agree, I at last concluded a treaty offensive and 

N 


194 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


defensive, by which each engaged not to trouble 
the other with invitations, nor be angry at 
not receiving them. Since that time, we have 
always lived on brotherly terms.'’ ’ 

It seems sad that such a lover of freedom as 
Mr. Bosville undoubtedly was should have died 
just too soon to know of the battle of Waterloo, 
where freedom was made secure for his country 
and so for Europe. His friend Horne Tooke 
had departed this life in 1813, and on December 
16 of the same year 4 Billy ’ Bosville closed his 
eyes upon this world. He was not quite 
seventy. He was buried near his father in the 
Church of St. Giles-in-the-Field, and the Inde¬ 
pendent Whig of Sunday, December 26, 1813, 
states that 4 Mr. Chippendall, who had long 
been the upholsterer of the deceased, conducted 
the funeral with great propriety.’ The same 
paper bursts forth into poetry in honour of his 
memory, thus :— 

Lov’d by his friends, and by his foes esteem’d, 

For even foes by goodness are redeem’d, 

Above all meanness, for he knew no pride, 

Unaw’d by Death, unblemish’d Bosville died. 

With sense that only Nature could impart, 

The smoothest temper and the kindest heart, 
Through various scenes of chequer’d life he went, 

His views unspotted and his end content. 


THE LAST OF THE BOSVILLES 195 


Equal to him the child of low degree, 

So honour grac’d him and his mind was free, 

Or one that glitter’d in the pomp of birth, 

For all he valu’d was unshaken worth : 

Though rich in fortune, yet in morals blest 
He felt secure of everlasting rest. 

Mild to the last, though tortur’d by disease, 

His only conduct was his guests to please. 

Alas ! how fruitless did that conduct prove ! 

What heart could smile with such a wreck above ? 
Ingenious med’cine lent a short repose, 

And hope still linger’d as our wishes rose. 

How vain, how transient was the gleam she gave ! 
Alas ! it only glimmer’d to the grave. 

Pure resignation pour’d its daily balm ; 

His frame was restless but his mind was calm. 

No vain fantastic terrors scar’d his soul, 

For conscious virtue occupied the whole. 

O’er worlds to come no vague reflection rov’d, 

His life was guiltless and his end unmov’d. 

By slow degrees to dissolution led, 

The good man sank and mingled with the dead. 


These lines must have been written by one 
of the daily guests waiting on December 16 for 
the usual dinner, which Mr. Bosville insisted 
should be prepared according to custom, but 
which he did not live long enough to ensure to 
his friends. They make a sad picture of the 
passing of the last male Bosville. Let us hope 
that c Billy 5 had a better consolation and trust 
than the poet knew of. 


196 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


The following lines, dated January 5, 1814, 
are at Thorpe :— 

ON THE DEATH OF WILLIAM BOSVILLE, ESQ. 

Mixt with the good in happier seats above, 

Blest in the presence of Eternal Love, 

Bosville, to thee with just, congenial Praise 
What Monument shall pious Friendship raise ? 

Thy soul through Life elate in conscious Worth 
Despis’d the Glare of Wealth, the Pride of Birth : 
E’en thy last words repell’d, to Pomp averse, 

The crowded Pageant from thy hallow’d Hearse. 
Through Life to Death the same ; thy gen’rous Plan 
Pure from its Source with even Tenour ran ; 

To social Friends an ever-open Door ; 

An ever-open Hand to feed the Poor : 

Thine be the Praise beyond the Sculptor’s Art, 

Thy virtuous Life deep imag’d in each Heart. 

Soon, too, shall come thy well-appointed Heir 
The Joys of Peace, by Valour earn’d, to share ; 

To bless the faithful Love, that long deplores 
His long, long absence on Iberia’s shores ; 

Yet no Complaint; save on the Mourner’s cheek 
A silent Tear ; which more than Words can speak, 
Marks to her Children’s gaze their Mother’s woe, 

Yet tells a Hope that only Mothers know ; 

The dear fond Hope their much-lov’d Sire to see, 
With Health, with Honour crown’d, from Danger free. 
Rich in the double Gift by Ileav’n assign’d, 

The ample Fortune and the lib’ral Mind, 

True to himself, to Sacred Friendship true 
With just Selection, Bosville’s Plans pursue. 

Draw from two kindred Stems one noble Line, 

Add Name to Name and Worth with Worth combine. 



THE LAST OF THE BOSVILLES 197 


This well-meant tribute makes one very glad 
that memorial verses are no longer the fashion ! 

The Independent Whig goes into detail as to 
the manner in which William Bosville’s estates 
were distributed by his will. Mrs. Beaumont 
was heir to one (probably Gunnerton) following 
her father’s arrangement, and after legacies, 
which amounted to not above £30,000, every¬ 
thing else was left to his nephew, Colonel the 
Hon. Godfrey Macdonald and his children. 
Colonel Macdonald’s mother, as we know, had 
been Elizabeth Diana Bosville, the testator’s 
sister ; she had died in 1789. Colonel Mac¬ 
donald, by the terms of the will, assumed his 
mother’s name, and so once more there was a 
Godfrey Bosville, and moreover one who with 
his wife and family went to live at Thorpe, 
which they made their home, Colonel Mac¬ 
donald retiring from the Army on his return 
from the Peninsular War with the rank of 
Major-General. 

And now began a period of happy family life 
at Thorpe, where General and Mrs. Bosville, 
surrounded by their children, made the house 
lovely with beautiful pictures, and embellished 
the place with ponds and groves, built a charm¬ 
ing dairy in the grounds, filled once more the 


198 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

stables, and entertained a large circle of friends 
and relations, making music often in the gallery, 
where a cupboard is still filled with their string- 
music. General Bosville had even taken his 
beloved violoncello to the Peninsula, and now 
in times of peace he played at home, surrounded 
by members of his family with fiddles and viola. 
He also took his part in county affairs, and 
built a Justice Room close to the Hall, where, 
amidst other business, he composed village 
quarrels by methods of his own : rival beauties 
who had fiercely quarrelled being ordered and 
made to 4 kiss friends again 5 in his presence. 
His eldest son, who had been educated at 
Harrow and at Cambridge, married in 1823. 
The eldest daughters were married and younger 
brothers and sisters growing up when the 
second Lord Macdonald died and his brother 
General Bosville succeeded him as third Lord 
Macdonald in 1824. On this event he retook 
the name of Macdonald. But the name of 
Bosville was guarded by the will of its late 
owner, which stipulated that the possessor of 
Thorpe should bear that surname ; and when 
in 1832 the third Lord Macdonald died suddenly 
from a heart attack, aged only fifty-five, it was 
expected that his second son should succeed to 


THE LAST OF THE BOSVILLES 199 


the Bosville name and estates. This, indeed, 
was provided in the third Lord’s will, which is 
still at Thorpe, and which leaves the Scottish 
honours and estates 6 to my eldest son, Alex¬ 
ander William Robert.’ 

But the second son claimed the place of the 
eldest, whom he pronounced to be illegitimate. 
His excuse for so doing went back to the days 
of his parents’ Scottish marriage to which they 
had been forced, owing to the guardians of the 
bride, who was under age, refusing their con¬ 
sent to any wedding between her and Godfrey 
Macdonald. It was only in 1803, nearly four 
years later, that Godfrey found that a doubt 
was thrown on the validity of this Scottish 
marriage. At once he wedded his wife again, 
in Norwich, where he happened to be quar¬ 
tered. By Scottish law this English wedding 
would naturally have legitimated any child 
born previously, if the father’s domicile was a 
Scottish one. The law of domicile was then 
very little understood, and Godfrey’s travels as 
a soldier were supposed, very wrongly, to have 
altered his original Scottish one. It was only in 
1910 that this question of his domicile was finally 
settled by the Court of Session in Edinburgh, 
and all his children declared equally legitimate. 


200 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

But in the meantime the third Lord’s second 
son, Godfrey William, had become fourth Lord 
Macdonald, while the eldest son Alexander was 
known by the name of Bosville and assumed 
the ownership of the Bosville acres. In 1847 
a private Act was passed by Parliament 
settling the estates in this manner. This Act 
did not deal with the question of legitimacy 
or otherwise. The wrong was finally righted 
and judgment pronounced in accordance 
by Lord Skerrington on June 4, 1910. The 
grandson of Alexander William Robert then 
recovered his name and the old Macdonald 
baronetcy, together with the Chiefship of Sleat 
and claim to the chiefship of the whole Clan 
Donald. The Irish barony remained with the 
younger branch—not being a Scottish honour 
and not therefore affected by the Scots law of 
domicile. 

Thus, after the third Lord’s death, the name 
of Bosville remained for rather over seventy- 
seven years at Thorpe, and that name and the 
arms are still legally possessed by the present 
owner. 

The dispossessed Alexander, who had been 
always a most affectionate son and had grown 
up into a cultured, charming man, never got 


THE LAST OF THE BOSVILLES 201 


over the unexpected blow of finding his birth 
questioned and wrongdoing attributed to his 
beloved parents. Hardly had the private Act 
passed Parliament than he died, literally of a 
broken heart and spirit, in 1847, aged only 
forty-seven. By his wife, Matilda Bayard, he 
left one son and one daughter—Julia, who 
became the wife of Henry, eighth Lord Middle- 
ton. The son, Godfrey Wentworth Bayard 
Bosville, married in 1864 the sister of the same 
Lord Middleton, the Hon. Harriet Cassandra 
Willoughby ; but he died in little more than 
a year after his marriage, leaving a baby son, 
born September 26, 1865. It was only when 
this son, Alexander Wentworth Macdonald Bos¬ 
ville, grew up and married that doubts began 
to be whispered as to the correctness of the 
opinion hitherto held about his grandfather’s 
birth. Finally in 1910 the wrong was righted. 
The present owner of Thorpe was born at 
Settrington House, near Malton, one of Lord 
Middleton’s places (and oddly enough, the 
ninth Lord Middleton, Digby, was born at 
Thorpe !); but he has lived at Thorpe since he 
was four years old. Thither he brought his 
wife in 1886, and there his son and daughter 
were born. During his time, too, Thorpe has 


202 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

grown in acreage, neighbouring farms having 
been acquired; to do this, Denby and Ox¬ 
spring and some other West Riding property 
were sold. He has added a wing to the house, 
and a lovely flower garden has grown up at the 
back, stretching down to the ponds and stream 
with its waterfalls, and with a vista cut through 
the hanging woods on the opposite hill beyond 
the ponds. If the original Bosville line no 
longer remains, still the place is greatly loved 
and cared for by their descendants, who must 
ever be grateful for the English home which 
sheltered them and gave them a name when 
their own race and country disowned them. 


CHAPTER XII 


OTHER BOSVILLE BRANCHES 

Hunter tells us about various families of 
Bosvilles who lived and died as Yorkshire land- 
owners. Coningsborough Church holds many 
records in windows, monuments, and registers 
of a Coningsborough branch. These Bosvilles 
did not use quite the same arms ; they had the 
silver shield with the five red lozenges upon it, 
but above them not the three black bears’ 
heads, but 4 three mullets in chief ’ (a mullet 
looks rather like a star). The Gunthwaite 
arms, however, appeared in one window—that 
to the memory of 4 Richard Bosewell and Alice 
his wife ’ ; also 4 Thomas Boswell,’ probably 
their son, 4 who had this window made.’ The 
writer of a letter about the memorials of the 
Bosvilles at Coningsborough, addressed to 
Thomas Bosville of Warmsworth in the reign 
of King Charles i., remarks that another Bos¬ 
ville window 4 was broken by them which stole 
my grandfather’s hearse ’—that means a kind 

203 



204 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

of square draped tent, generally adorned with 
escutcheons, which used to be placed for a year 
over the spot where the remains of persons of 
eminence were buried. One general memorial 
to 4 Multi de familia Bossviliana 5 has been 
placed near a column in this church. Hunter 
gives a list of others 4 of this truly antient and 
eminent family 5 who were buried in Conings- 
borough Church. The last of the line seems to 
have been a Thomas Bosville; his brother 
George was one of the incumbents of the church 
and living. 

The parish registers of Coningsborough also 
yield an account of the family of Bosville of 
Clifton, a place close by, which boasted a per¬ 
manent beacon, one use of which was to collect 
the militia of the wapentake, upon its firing, 
at Doncaster. The Christian names in the 
Clifton family are William, Richard, Thomas, 
Gervas, and Edmund. Their records are from 
the sixteenth century to the middle of the 
eighteenth. The last-named Gervas Bosville 
had a daughter at school in 1760. The estate 
of Clifton is supposed to have passed into a 
family called Milwood, who married a Bosville, 
possibly the schoolgirl of 1760. 

It is most likely that 4 John Bossewell ’ who 


OTHER BOSVILLE BRANCHES 


205 


wrote Workes of Armourie was one of these 
Bosvilles. He calls himself a northern man, 
and the arms he bore, which appear on the 
title-page of his book, are the same as these 
borne by the Bosvilles seated at Conings- 
borough, Warmsworth, Braithwell, and Don¬ 
caster. They are : on a silver shield five red 
lozenges, and above them three black mullets 
(starry things). His book, a copy of the 1597 
edition of which is in the Thorpe library, was 
first published in 1572, and was dedicated 
to W. Cecil, Lord Burghley. Prefixed to the 
text is a long poem by Nicholas Roscarrocke, 
facetiously entitled 4 Cyllenius censure of 
the Author in his high Court of Heraultrie,’ 
from which the following lines, describing the 
Courts of Heraldry, are taken :— 

Within these sundry roomes, through wals y-built of 
Christal cleare, 

Eche thing that longs to Herehault’s Art doth perfectly 
appeare. 

There leeger bookes, of auncient gestes, y-writ by Tallas 
hand, 

There campings, mornings, musterings, there pedegrees 
do stand. 

There combats fierce, there Summons bold, there triumphs 
passing brave, 

Of crowning Kings, of dubbing Knights, the orders there 
they have. 



206 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

In the copy of this work at Thorpe the arms of 
Bosville of Gunthwaite are pictured at page 54, 
but no name is given ; on page 113 the Went¬ 
worth arms are both pictured and named. 

In Godfrey Bosville’s books in the library at 
Thorpe, his book-plates show these two coats 
put together—for him and his Wentworth wife. 

At Warmsworth the Bosvilles had a house 
even before they became possessed of the manor. 
The earliest recorded name of this branch is that 
of Thomas Bosville of Doncaster, younger* 
brother of Richard Bosville of Coningsborough, 
tempus Edward iv. His grandson, another 
Thomas, is described as ‘ of Doncaster and of 
Stainton ’; he died April 4, 5 Edward vi. His 
eldest son first appears as ‘ of Warmsworth,’ 
and was aged forty in 5 Edward vi. His second 
son is Thomas ‘ of Clifton,’ and his fourth is 
Jasper of Stainton,’ who became ancestor of 
Bosville of Braithwell. All these branches, 
according to Hunter, descend from Robert de 
Bosville who was Constable of the castle of 
Pontefract in the reign of King Edward m. 
Warmsworth finally descended to the three co¬ 
heirs of a Thomas Bosville, and they sold it in 
April 14, 1688, to John Battie of Wadworth, 
Esq., whose descendants still held the manor 


OTHER BOSVILLE BRANCHES 


207 


and advowsons when Hunter wrote his South 
Yorkshire . 

In the Braithwell pedigree, which begins with 
Jasper Bosville of Stainton, brother of Thomas 
Bosville of Warms worth, and whose will was 
proved January 6, 1557, we find the name of 
Hugh Bosville, died 1759, the second husband 
of Bridget Royston, widow of William Bosville 
of Gunthwaite and mother of the fourth God¬ 
frey. Hugh and Bridget had one daughter, 
Mary (the 4 pretty Sister 5 to whom Godfrey 
sent his love from Cambridge), who married 
Thomas Place of Green Hammerton, Esq. 

In this Braithwell pedigree we find, too, the 
three elder brothers of Hugh : one, Thomas 
Bosville, a Fellow of St. John’s College, Cam¬ 
bridge, and rector of Ufford, Co. Northampton, 
who married Elizabeth, daughter of John Bolle, 
Esq., of Thorpe Hall, Co. Lincoln, co-heir of 
her brother of the same place ; another, Alex¬ 
ander Bosville of London, a printer, who wrote 
sometimes to Godfrey Bosville of Gunthwaite— 
his brother Hugh’s stepson—and whose letters 
are at Thorpe (see page 4) ; and the third, 
John Bosville, who was the father of that 
Thomas Bosville of Braithwell who inherited 
Ulverstone Abbey, Co. Leicester, from his kins- 

K - - 1 ^ 



0 - 




w 




208 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

man Charles Bosville of Biana. This Thomas 
married his cousin Bridget Bosville, daughter of 
Thomas and Elizabeth (Bolle) Bosville, and they 
had a son, William Parkin Bosville of Raven- 
field. Neither this son nor his brother Thomas 
Bosville, a clerk, also of Ravenfield, left any 
children, and they end the Braithwell pedigree. 

W illiam 4 Parkin ’ Bosville must have been 
so christened after the husband of a niece of 
his great-great-grandfather, who was Mary 
Bosville (daughter of Jasper 4 of Wardsend 5 
in the Braithwell pedigree), who married, April 
25, 1673, Thomas Parkin of Sheffield. For we 
find a hundred years later that Ravenfield is 
in the possession, by purchase, of an old maiden 
lady Elizabeth Parkin, a granddaughter of 
Thomas and Mary (Bosville) Parkin, who on 
her death in 1766 left Ravenfield to various 
cousins in tail. W T hen Oborne and Wk>rgan 
cousins had died without heirs, Ravenfield went, 
by the will of the aforesaid Elizabeth Parkin, 
to William Parkin Bosville. This was in 1788. 
As we have seen, neither William nor his 
brother Thomas, who succeeded him at Raven¬ 
field, left heirs. On the death of Thomas, 
Ravenfield passed to Thomas James Birch, 
Esq., of Thorpe Hall, Co. Lincoln, Major and 



THORPE HALL IN THE EAST RIDING OF YORKSHIRE 









OTHER BOSVILLE BRANCHES 


209 


Lieut.-Colonel in the First Regiment of Guards. 
He was the only child of James Birch of 
Coventry and Thorpe Hall, Esq., and Margaret 
Bosville, sister of the mother of William Parkin 
and Thomas Bosville, and therefore their aunt. 
Colonel Birch, by royal sign manual dated 
May 22, 1824, took his grandmother’s name of 
Bosville—which the Ravenfield family spell 
Bosvile. 

The Bosvilles of Chevet descended from 
Thomas de Bosville, a younger son of Thomas 
Bosville of Ardsley and New Hall and of Alicia 
de Gunthwaite. 

This younger Thomas married Alice, daughter 
and heir of William Monk of Chevet. Their 
grandson, Sir John Bosville, married Constance, 
daughter and heir of John Mounteney. They 
had three sons—Achilles, Thomas, and John 
c of Stoke.’ The two former died without issue. 
John married a Matilda, and had John, married 
to Joan Radcliffe of Ordsal, whose son was 
William, married to Elizabeth, daughter of 
Percival Amias. They had two daughters, 
Elizabeth and Alice Bosville, both of whom 
married Nevills, and so Bosville of Chevet 
turned into Nevill of Chevet. 


o 


210 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


Chevet is now the seat of the Pilkington 
family. 

Among all these Bosvilles, I have not been 
able to identify 4 Miss Bosville who came of 
age in 1727.’ I think she must have belonged 
to Biana or else to some Kentish family. A 
paper at Thorpe is inscribed : 4 Directions about 
Miss Bosville.’ She was evidently an heiress, 
and equally evidently a young lady of decided 
opinions and will, for she insisted on being 
taken away from school and being set up in 
lodgings in London. The paper becomes very 
agitated about this, but provides several aunts 
to live with this impetuous young woman, and 
also supplies her with a coach. When she came 
of age she was shown her rent roll 4 at Biana.’ 
Many heartburnings are recorded as to her 
desire to marry a Roman Catholic (he is not 
named) ; but alas ! the paper ends abruptly, 
and nothing more transpires about 4 Miss 
Bosville.’ 


CHAPTER XIII 


NOTES ON THE FAMILY COAT 

The silver shield of the Bosvilles, in Sir Martin 
de Bosville’s day, had a gyronny of five, sable 
in fess, with five fusils gules in chief. 

Bosville of Newhall and Ardsley and Bos- 
ville of Gunthwaite used the same coat (as 
on front of this volume) thus : Argent, five 
fusils in fess gules, in chief three bears’ heads 
sable. 

The bears’ heads were won on the field of 
Poitiers in 1356 (see page 28). 

When those members of the family who left 
Gunthwaite and settled in Kent used their 
family coat of arms, they did so with a differ¬ 
ence : they put gold muzzles on to the three 
black bears’ heads ; and when, on the failure 
of the elder branch, they returned to Gun¬ 
thwaite, they retained this difference, which is 
still preserved on the Bosville coat which 
belongs to the present representative of the 

Gunthwaite family and owner of that place. 

211 


212 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

The Bosvilles of Coningsborough and other 
places round Doncaster had for arms : Argent, 
five fusils in fess gules, in chief three mullets 
sable. 

The Bosvilles of Chevet had : Argent, five 
fusils in fess gules, in chief three martlets 
sable. 

The Chevet Bosville arms in Thribergh 
Church show : Argent, four (not five) fusils in 
fess gules, and three martlets sable in chief. 
(See Hunter’s South Yorkshire, vol. ii. page 43.) 

The Bosville crest is a White Bull issuing 
from a Holt of Trees proper. 

The Bosville Motto is : c Virtus propter se.’ 


CHAPTER XIV 


A CONTRAST IN BOSVILLES 

In the days of James vi. of Scotland, one of 
his c chirurgeons 5 was George Boswell, a por¬ 
trait of whom still exists in the possession of 
Mr. Thomas Innes, Advocate, of Learny, in the 
county of Aberdeen. This portrait is on a wood 
panel, size 39 inches by 24 inches, and it has 
been reproduced in the Caledonian Medical 
Journal for August 1925, where it is made the 
subject of a paper by David Rorie, D.S.O., 
M.O., D.P.H., the President of the Caledonian 
Medical Society ; and it is to this paper I am 
indebted for the information I now hand on. 

The portrait bears George Boswell’s coat of 
arms, his initials, his age (forty-four), and the 
date, 1582. On the back of the panel is 
painted a skeleton and a number of verses. 
Round the frame is ‘ Georgius Boswall Medicus 
et Chirurgus iEtatis Suae 44, 1582.’ Dr. Rorie 
gives George Boswell’s descent, which adds 
some interesting intelligence to our knowledge 

213 


214 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

of how the Scottish Bosvilles first went into 
Scotland. He says : 4 The founder of his 

family was Robert, Sieur de Bossuille, whose 
designation is held to derive from Bosville, 
near Valtot in Normandy. He was a vassal 
and, according to tradition, a relative of Lord 
Warenne, in feoff of whom he settled, after the 
Norman Conquest, at Castleacre, Norfolk. One 
of Robert’s grandsons, Sir Elias, went to the 
Crusades with the then Lord Warenne, and the 
second son of the Crusader, another Robert 
(1165-1220) accompanied William the Lion to 
Scotland and got Oxmuir in Berwick. A great- 
grandson of Robert, Roger by name, married a 
daughter of Sir William de Lochore of that ilk. 
His grandson, again, was David Boswell, first 
of Balmuto. David married twice, and by his 
first wife had two sons and a daughter who 
became spouse to John Beaton of Balfour 
and grandmother of the famous Cardinal 
Beaton.’ 

This connection is interesting, as the Mac- 
Beaths or Bethunes or Beatons were by 
appointment 4 Physicians to the Lords of the 
Isles and Kings of Scotland.’ (See the Gaelic 
manuscript, Regimen Sanitates , from the Vade 
Mecum of the famous MacBeaths, translated 


A CONTRAST IN BOSVILLES 


215 


into English by H. Cameron Gillies. Glasgow 
University Press, 1911.) 

4 The first Laird of Balmuto’s son, also David, 
married as his second wife Lady Margaret 
Sinclair, daughter of the third Earl of Orkney 
and Caithness. Their second son, Thomas, 
became first Laird of Auchinleck, and his 
descendant Alexander, eighth of Auchinleck, 
became Lord Auchinleck (of the Scots Bench) 
and father to the Bear Leader of the Great 
Cham of Literature. George Boswell himself, 
who was born in 1538, was the grandson of 
Sir Alexander Boswell, third of Balmuto, who 
fell at Flodden in 1513, and ninth son of David 
Boswell, fourth of Balmuto, by his wife Eliza¬ 
beth, daughter of Sir John Moncreiffe of that 
ilk. He had nine brothers and ten sisters ! ! 
His father, according to Fullerton’s Scottish 
Nation , was held in great esteem by King 
James v., Queen Mary, and King James vi., 
from all of whom he had several friendly and 
familiar letters. He was engaged in most of the 
public transactions of his time and died in 
1582—the year in which his son’s portrait was 
painted—in the eighty-fourth year of his life. 
His tenth and youngest son, also christened 
George, was parson of Auchterderran in Fife, 



216 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


and wrote a genealogical history of the Balmuto 
family. 

c Georgius married a Janet Macgregor and 
had three sons and four daughters. It is 
probable that his descendants died out, as the 
portrait ultimately landed at Balmuto. He is 
first mentioned as Chirurgus Regis in a great 
seal charter confirming a charter by his brother 
Sir John Boswell of Balmuto and his wife 
Isobel Sandilands, dated 11th October 1591, 
and in January 1612 (nine years after King 
James had gone into England) he is witness to 
another charter of his brother’s, at Balmuto. 
By 11th July of that year (1612) a certain 
John Naismith is mentioned in the Great Seal 
as 66 Chirurgus regis,” so Georgius Boswell 
probably died between January and July 
1612, when he would be 74 years of age.’ 

In his portrait Dr. George Boswell looks far 
older than his forty-four years. He wears a 
beard cut like his master’s, the King’s, and has 
a somewhat unwieldy figure. But his expres¬ 
sion is kind, and one can quite imagine him the 
possessor of a soothing bedside manner—but 
not of patience to listen to any attempt to 
evade his nostrums. In his right hand he 
holds a phial, probably the medicine bottle of 


A CONTRAST IN BOSVILLES 


217 


the period, and the other hand holds its 
stopper. And one feels there will be little use 
in begging to be excused the dose ! 

This most superior and orthodox looking 
physician would no doubt have been perfectly 
horrified to hear that even a very distant 
relation lived with the gipsies ! But Charles 
Bosville, who must have been born about 
twenty-five years after Dr. George died, actu¬ 
ally not only yielded to the fascination of 4 the 
wraggle-taggle Gipsies O ! 5 enough to be 4 off ’ 
finally with them, but made himself so popular 
among them that he was called their 6 King.’ 
A writer named De la Pryme of Hatfield 
describes Charles as 4 a mad spark, mighty fine 
and brisk, and keeps company with a great 
many gentlemen, knights and esquires, yet runs 
about the country.’ Hunter tells us he was a 
gentleman with an estate of £200 a year, yet 
he frequented the company of the gipsies who 
used to encamp on the Ybrkshire moors, and 
he had such influence with them that his word 
to them was law, and his authority was so 
great that he was able perfectly to restrain the 
pilfering habits of his people, and gained for 
himself and for them the entire goodwill of the 
farmers and people around. When he died, he 


218 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

was buried, as the Church Register records, 
close to the chancel of St. Michael’s Church, 
Rossington, not far from Doncaster, on January 
30 , 1708 - 09 . The flat stone over his grave was 
surrounded by an iron railing to preserve it. 
No gipsy, passing near, failed to come to pay 
his respects at the grave of him the gipsies called 
their king, and even now, if you ask the gipsies 
their name, they will be very likely to tell you 
they are 4 Bosville’s folk. In many places, 
especially in Scotland, the name is pronounced 
Boswell, and on so recent a date as May 9 , 1926 , 
the Daily Graphic newspaper had a picture of 
the funeral, at Farnborough the day before, of 
Levi Boswell, the gipsy king. On this occasion 
the coffin was drawn by six horses with postil¬ 
lion as well as coachman ; and the Daily Mail 
of the same date records that 4 the King went 
to his burial wearing, as marks of his chieftain¬ 
ship of the Clan Boswell ’ (!), bright yellow 
socks and a muffler of brilliant red. This gipsy 
king had lived at Bromley for twenty years ; 
one wonders whether he had in his veins a drop 
of the blood of Charles Bosville ! 

Borrow evidently had met Bosville gipsies, 
for he gives to the Tinman Tinker, about whom 
he tells us, the name of 4 Blazing Bosville,’ 


A CONTRAST IN BOSVILLES 219 

Unlike the physician George, whose descent 
and honours are so carefully recorded, Charles 
has left no account of the branch of the family 
from which he sprang; but as 4 the King of 
the Gipsies 5 he remains for all time a romantic, 
fascinating and adventurous personality. 


CHAPTER XV 

A BUNDLE OF OLD PAPERS 

At Thorpe one day the writer was poking 
among the contents of a box of old papers 
which lay all muddled up together, having 
evidently been thrown anyhow into their 
resting-place. She lifted one of the papers and 
read : Heads of an Indenture between Lord 
Grimston and his Eldest Son of the first part 
and of Mrs. Arabella Pershall of the 2nd part,’ 
and a little examination showed that this was 
what in modern days is called a Wedding 
Settlement. 

It recites that Mrs. Arabella Pershall is 
4 seized of Manours, Lands and Hereditam ts in 
Com: Stafford.’ Evidently she was not only 
the possessor of a pretty name, but also a con¬ 
siderable heiress; and we read on that 6 a 
Marriage is intended between Mr. Grimston 
and Mrs. Pershall.’ And then, after the manner 
of lawyers, lands in Staffordshire, lands in Herts 
and various moneys are solemnly settled on the 


220 


A BUNDLE OF OLD PAPERS 


221 


pair and on their descendants, down to the 
youngest daughter’s portion. At last the end 
is reached, and then comes a bad shock, for 
in another hand is written, c This marriage 
never took place ’ ; and it is noted that Lord 
Grimston’s son has gone abroad ! This seemed 
a sad end to so much careful planning, and one 
longed to know if pretty Mistress Arabella 
minded, or whether she could possibly have 
changed her mind. 

No date is upon the document, but later 
search among the contents of the box ended 
Arabella’s story quite satisfactorily. Other 
papers showed that she was related to the 
Bosvilles of Biana, who had intermarried with 
the Pershalls, and that on the death of Sir 
Thomas Pershall of Sugnall, Baronet, Co. 
Stafford, his granddaughter and heiress, Ara¬ 
bella, had been put under the guardianship of 
Robert Bosville of Biana (probably her maternal 
uncle). That gentleman appeared to have sold 
a mortgage of Sir Thomas Pershall’s on March 
19, 1730 to His Grace the Duke of Kent (one 
of the Grey family); at any rate, a counterpart 
of the assignment of the mortgage to the Duke 
is still at Thorpe. There is also a paper dated 
11 George i. (presumably 1725), which is a 


222 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


‘ Release of the Effects of John Bosville ’ to 
Robert Bosville (evidently John's eldest son) 
from his brothers and sisters—Henry, Charles, 
Thomas, Frances and Elizabeth. This deed is 
witnessed by four people, and one signature is 
that of 6 Arabella Pershall,’ so she must have 
been of age in 1725. Not till 1730 does a 
consoling happening come to light. But in 
that year another marriage is in contempla¬ 
tion, so we may hope that Arabella's tears—if 
they had fallen for Mr. Grimston—had been 
forgotten, or perhaps kissed away. 

The new suitor was Lord Glenorchv, the son 
of John, second Earl of Breadalbane. He had 
been married before—and now the assignment 
of Sir Thomas Pershall’s mortgage is explained, 
for the first Lady Glenorchy, we find, had been 
Lady Amabel de Grey, eldest daughter and co¬ 
heir of Henry Duke of Kent. The assignment 
had evidently something to do with fresh mar¬ 
riage settlements. Lord Glenorchy, who was 
born in 1696, had lost his first wife in 1727. He 
had served his country in various ways : had 
been Ambassador to the Danish and Russian 
Courts, and in 1727 was M.P. for Saltash. No 
doubt such a travelled and polished lover could 
woo well and would be indeed likely to find 




A BUNDLE OF OLD PAPERS 


223 


favour in the eyes of his heart’s mistress. 
There are two letters of his at Thorpe, but, alas ! 
not to Arabella—only to her guardian. They 
are written in a good bold hand and most 
clearly expressed, and are dated respectively 
‘London, 19th January 1730/1’ and ‘London, 
6th February 1730/1.’ Between the writing 
of these two letters, on January 23, he and 
Arabella had been married. 

In 1752 Lord Glenorchy succeeded his father 
and became third Earl of Breadalbane and the 
last of that line ; for both Arabella’s sons died 
—the elder as an infant. The younger lived to 
grow up and to marry, but had no children ; 
it was his widow (Willielma Maxwell) who was 
the Lady Glenorchy so famous in the Highlands 
for her good works. 

Of Arabella we hear no more except that she 
died in 1762. 

Lord Glenorchy’s two letters at Thorpe are 
entirely about business. The only interesting 
bit in them is when he is discussing the manner 
of paying a sum due to Robert Bosville, and 
says:— 

‘ I was a good deal surprised to find you make 
a difficulty to receive the money in Bank Notes, 
which tho’ indeed the Law does not oblige a 



224 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


Mortgagee to accept, was I believe never 
refused between Gentlemen, and I think it the 
more extraordinary since you cannot be ignor¬ 
ant of the difficulty in sending specie so far. I 
don’t doubt but upon recollection you will act 
in this matter in the manner you might justly 
expect I would with you or any other gentle¬ 
man, and take the money in the most con¬ 
venient and natural way of paying it at this 
distance, I mean Bank Notes, which I can send 
you for small sums, that they may be the easier 
changed, if necessary, in the Country. If you 
persist absolutely in refusing them, I desire to 
know it by the first post, that I may try 
to find out some other method of paying the 
money.’ 

We shall never know if Robert insisted upon 
gold, and whether it arrived upon a string of 
mules or pack-horses at Biana ; it could not 
come in c the Stone Bag ’ like the letters. He 
must have been a little nettled by the implica¬ 
tion that money could be hardly necessary, so 
far as spending it went, in the country ! No 
doubt all Arabella’s trousseau had been made 
in the house by a 6 cunning taylour,’ who 
needed payment, not to speak of the farm bills 
and servants’ wages, none of which could be 


A BUNDLE OF OLD PAPERS 


225 


easily settled by the offer of strange bank notes 
instead of genuine money ! 

Oddly enough, it was just about the time 
that Arabella Countess of Breadalbane died 
that Charles Bosville, the last of the brothers, 
passed away at Biana, and the house and place 
became the property of Godfrey Bosville of 
Gunth waite. 


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226 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


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Roger Bosville, = Alice. Thomas, Richard. Anthony, 

living 1379. from whom Margaret. living 1383. 

the Bosvilles 
of Ohevet. 




















Thomas=Margaret. X. Joiin Bosville = Isabel, William Anthony. 


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Thomas Bosville = Isabel, John, John, Richard. James Bosville, 

of Ardsley and New- dau. of John Rector a Knight son and heir. 

hall, son and heir. Hastings of of of 

Fenwick. Darfield. Rhodes. 



















John =: Isabel, Hugh, Richard. Muriel, Elizabeth, .. m. Ralph Alexander, = Elizabeth, 

Bosville, dau. of Rector James. m. m. John de la Hagh. of Hodsley, dau. of 

of Ardsle}^ Nicholas of Sir John Keresforth. .. m. living Thomas 

and Wortley of Darfield. Burton of Isabel. Dodworth. 1541. Wheatley of 

Newhall. Wortley. Kinsley. Woolley. 


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* Broxholm married secondly Ann, daughter of William Marbury, by whom he had John and others. See 
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William Bosville, XXI. Godfrey Bosville = Diana, eldest dan. of Mary Bosville, 

son and heir apparent, of Gunthwaite, Esq., Sir William Wentworth only issue, 

d. young. and of Thorpe in the of West Bretton, Bart., m. Thomas Place of 

East Riding, sister of Sir Thomas Green Hammerton, 


234 


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236 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


Note to Muriel, daughter of Charles Barnby 
of Barnby Hall, the wife of John Bosville 
(tempos Henry VIII.) and mother of the first 
Godfrey Bosville. 


This lady, says Baverstoke (in his genealogical 
Tables of the Bosville Family, printed in the same 
pamphlet with ‘ Some Account of Maidstone in Kent,’ 
published 1832), was descended from William the 
Conqueror, and in proof thereof gives the following 
Table (XI) * 


V ILLIAM THE CONQUEROR, = Maud, dau. of Baldwin, 


King of England, d. 1087. 


5th Count of Flanders, d. 1083. 


Henry I.,— Maud, dau. of Malcolm, Gundreda, = William de 


King of England 


King of Scotland. 


Geoffrey = Maud, only dau. 


Plantagenet 


and sole heir of 
Henry I. 


dau. of 
William the 
Conqueror, 
d. 1085. 


I 


Warren, Earl of 
Surrey, d. 1088. 


Henry II.,— Eleanor of Poitou "William de = Isabella, dau 


King of England 


and Guienne, wife 
formerly of the 
King of France, 
Louis vii. 


Warren, 
Earl of Surrey, 
d. 1130. 


John, = Isabella of 
King of England. Angouleme. 


Hugh Magnus, 
Count of Ver- 
mandois, son of 
Henry I. of 
France, and 
grandson of 
Hugh Capet. 


of 


Henry III., ^Eleanor 


King of England 


of Provence. 


William 
de Warren. 


Ada, = Henry, Earl of 


2 nd dau. 


Huntingdon 
and Prince of 
Scotland, son 
of David I. 


U —Eleanor, dau. David, Earl of = Margaret, dau 


King of England. 


of Ferdinand, 
King of Castile 
and Leon, d. 1295 


Huntingdon, 
brother of 
Malcolm and of 
William the 
Lion, King of 
Scotland. 


of 

Hugh and sister of 
Ralph, Earls of 
Chester. 


a 


b 





















BOSVILLE OF GUNTHWAITE PEDIGREE 237 


a 


b 


Joan, of Acre, = Gilbert de Clare, 
youngest dau., I Earl of Gloucester, 
b. 1272, d. 1305. | 


Ada, = Henry de Hastings, 
dau. and a powerful Baron and 
co-heir. Seneschal of Gascony, 
d. 1250. 


Eleanor de Clare,: 
2 nd dau. and 
co-heir. 


Hugh le Despencer, 
Earl of Gloucester, 
beheaded 1328. 


Henry de Hastings, =. 

d. 1269. I 


John de Hastings, = 
one of the 
competitors for the 
Crown of Scotland, 
d. 1312. 


Edward le Despencer, = 
2nd son, d. 1342. 


Hugh Hastings, Lord of Fenwick, = 

d. 1347. 


Sir Edward le Despencer, K.G., =. Hugh Hastings, = 

d. 1375. I d. 1370. 


i 


Anne, dau, of Sir Edward le: 

Despencer. 


I 

Sir Hugh Hastings, died in Spain on 
a pilgrimage to Jerusalem. 


Edward de Hastings, = 
d. 1439. 


John de Hastings, = 
d. 1417. 


Isabel, =Sir Robert Hildyard, of Winsted, knighted at the Coronation 
of Richard III. of England, d. 1502. 


daughter. 


Dionys,= Charles BARNBy of Barnby Hall, Co. York, 
daughter. 


Muriel, = John Bosville of Gunthwaite, father of Godfrey Bosville and 


daughter. 


of Sir Ralph Bosville of Bradbourn, Co. Kent. 


(See Bosville of Gunthwaite Pedigree, p. 231.) 





































238 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


As Matilda or Maud, daughter of Baldwin, 5th Count 
of Flanders and wife of William the Conqueror, 
descended from Charlemagne, this descent also is 
handed on to the Bosvilles, as follows :— 


Charlemagne, = Hildegardis, dau. of Childebrand, 


crowned 768, d. 814. 


Duke of Swabia. 


Louis le Debonnaire, = Irmungardis, dau. of Ingram, 
King of France, d. 840. Count of Hesbane. 


Charles le Chauve, = Irmuntrudis, dau. of Odo, 
d. 878. Count of Orleans. 


Charles the Bald, and widow 
of Ethelbert, King of England. 


Judith, dau. of = Baldwin, Count of Flanders, 


‘ Bras de Fer.’ 


I 


Baldwin, Count of Flanders= Alice, dau. of Robert, King of France. 


Maud, dau. of Baldwin, = King William I. of England, 
Count of Flanders, the Conqueror. 


Note to Judith, daughter of Charles 

le Chauve. 

This lady’s matrimonial affairs were not dull, to say 
the least of it. When she was twelve years old she 
was married to King Ethelwulf of England, and on his 
death, presumably soon afterwards, she became the 
wife of his son Ethelbald 1 —she was thus both step¬ 
mother and sister-in-law to the great King Alfred of 
England. But Baldwin Bras de Fer carried her off 
forcibly and made her Countess of Flanders. 


1 Not Ethelbert (another son), as Baverstoke says. 












BOSVILLE OF BRAITHWELL PEDIGREE 


239 


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240 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


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6 


William Parkin Bosville — Francks, dau. of Thomas Bosville 

of Ravenfield, Esq., Thomas Hedges of Tudeley, of Ravenfield, 
d. 4 August 1811, Co. Kent, Esq. clerk, 

aged 67, without issue. d. unmarried. 














APPENDIX II 


COPY OF A PAPER CALLED ‘ A RENTALL OF 
CAPTAIN BOSVILLE’S ESTATE FOR MAR¬ 
TINMAS 1722.’ 

Gunthwaite 

Land Tax 



£ 

s. 

d. 

£ 

s. 

d. 

Francis Ellison 

13 

07 

02 

0 

9 

41 

John Horn 

05 

17 

09 

0 

3 

9 

Thomas Walshaw . 

07 

05 

00 

0 

4 

6 

Jim France . 

01 

13 

09 

0 

0 

0 

John Lockwood 

09 

03 

08* 

1 0 

3 

7 





l 0 

3 

6 

John Rich 

01 

07 

06 

0 

0 

10 | 

Wm. Gaunt . 

13 

15 

06 

0 

8 

1 

John Kilner . 

09 

05 

06 

0 

6 

6 

Joseph Archer 

02 

07 

06 

0 

1 

6 

Widow Micklethwaite 

02 

00 

00 

0 

1 

3 


66 

03 

04 1 

1 

19 

7 

Smawds 






Land Tax 



• 

. 2 

5 

0 

To Sir R. Ashton 



• 

. 6 

0 

0 

To Mrs. W m Tempest 


• 

. 0 

2 

6 

Window Tax 



• 

. 0 

7 

6 

Richard Elterbeck . 

38 

17 

6 




Anthony Hewes 

3 

12 

6 

0 

0 

0 


Q 








242 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


Rotsey 

Land Tax 




£ 

s. 

d. 

£ 

s. 

d. 

Wm. Atkinson 

• 

4 

05 

00 

01 

10 

0 

New 

Hall 





Joseph Methley 

• 

32 

10 

00 

1 

1 

6 

Denby 






Samuel Micklethwaite 

• 

03 

10 

03 

0 

2 

3 

Elihu Dickison 

• 

02 

06 

03 

0 

1 

10 

Henry Marsden 

• 

04 

05 

00 

0 

2 

7 

Ab: Wood 

• 

07 

00 

03 

0 

4 

7 

Tobyas Mallison 

• 

07 

03 

06 

0 

3 

11 

And for Wood 

• 



• 


fiT 

O 

0 

And for New House 


• 

0 

0 

11 

Jonathan Gaunt 

• 

03 

02 

09 

0 

2 

0 

Joseph Gaunt 

• 

06 

06 

01 

0 

4 

6 

John Robinson 

• 

00 

05 

00 

0 

0 

0 

John Norton . 

• 

03 

04 

06 

0 

1 

9 

John Ward 

• 

02 

11 

09 

0 

1 

8 

Joseph Norton 

• 

01 

00 

03 

0 

0 

7 

John Kilner . 

• 

02 

05 

03 

0 

1 

9 

Joshua Gaunt 

• 

03 

00 

03 

0 

2 

1 

Joseph Thewlis 

• 

02 

00 

03 

0 

1 

5 

Widdow Beaumont. 

• 

09 

09 

06 

0 

5 

9 

John Horn 

• 

11 

15 

03 

0 

5 

0 



70 

06 

01 

2 

7 

7 







CAPTAIN BOSVILLE’S ESTATE 


243 


Cawthorne 

Land Tax 



£ 

s. 

d. 

£ 

s. 

d . 

William Green 

0 

05 

00 

0 

0 

0 

Mary Sykes . 

04 

10 

03 

0 

2 

10 

Nat: Bower . 

07 

10 

03 

0 

5 

4 

Emor Rich 

06 

15 

03 

0 

4 

4 

Thomas Walton 

04 

10 

03 

0 

3 

4 

John Shirt 

03 

08 

03 

0 

2 

0 

Jim: Shirt 

02 

08 

03 

0 

1 

0 

Richard Dobson 

03 

17 

03 

0 

2 


John Wain wright . 

04 

15 

03 

0 

3 

2 

Lionel Hawksworth 

00 

18 

03 

0 

0 

n 

John Longley 

00 

12 

09 

0 

0 

5 

Jonathan Street 

01 

17 

03 

0 

1 

2 

John Swift 

01 

15 

00 

0 

0 

10| 

Rd: Frith 

01 

15 

00 

0 

0 

10i 

Joseph Field] more for S’y 

26 

00 

06 

0 

17 

4 

t Wood 



• 

0 

8 

2 

John Rich 

07 

05 

03 

0 

4 

8 


78 

04 

00 

2 

18 

ty 3 

* 4 

Oxspring 





Francis Wood Senior 

07 

08 

o 

o 

M|H 

0 

4 

n 

John Wilkinson 

09 

01 

03 

0 

6 

10 

John Earnshaw 

04 

07 

ll 1 

2 

0 

3 

2 

William Earnshaw . 

02 

14 

06 

0 

1 

101 

Margaret Swift, Widdow 

03 

13 

10 

0 

2 

8 

John Balmforth 

04 

13 

00J 

0 

3 

2 

Jonas Cook . 

07 

11 

08| 

0 

5 

00 

Wm. Wordsworth . 

05 

00 

051 

0 

3 

9 








244 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


Land Tax 




£ 

s. 

d. 

£ 

s. 

d. 

John Street . 

• 

07 

11 

03 

0 

5 

82 

Rbt Goddard 

• 

2 

10 

05 

0 

1 

1<H 






(0 

3 

2 

Martin Stanley 

• 

17 

07 

00 

0 

9 

ii 

a 2 






(° 

0 

9 

John Pashley 

• 

05 

01 

00 

0 

3 

9 

Jonathan Chatterton 

• 

02 

00 

06 

0 

1 

6 



79 

00 

11 

2 

17 

8 

Rough Birchworth 




Richard Ellis 

• 

f07 

00 


0 

5 

H 

More upon ye Account of 

J 

1 






Walling 

• 

|oo 

02 

06 




Rbt Camm 

• 

05 

00 

08 

0 

3 

9 

John Parkin . 

• 

04 

05 

06 

0 

3 

2 

Francis Wood, junior 

• 

00 

09 

00 






16 

18 

71 

0 

12 

91 

^2 


Middop 






Jonathan Woodhouse 


03 

03 

04 

0 

3 

8 

Ben Downing. 


11 

05 

00 

0 

11 

3| 

John Charles worth . 


11 

05 

00 

0 

11 

H 

Jim Charlesworth . 


03 

00 

00 

0 

3 

0 

Samuel Ellis . 


22 

10 

00 

1 

1 

7 

Joseph Woodhouse 


03 

13 

00 

0 

3 

9J 

Joseph Hawley 


03 

00 

00 

0 

3 

0 

Nic: Walker . 


06 

05 

00 

0 

6 

0| 



64 

13 

4 

3 

4 

7| 














CAPTAIN BOSVILLE’S ESTATE 


245 


Cottage and Chief Rents—Gunthwaite 



£ 

s. 

d. 

Rebeccah Brooksbank .... 

00 

01 

00 

Denby Chief Rents 




Joseph Mossley ..... 

00 

03 

07i 

Joseph Thewlis for Mason’s land . 

00 

03 

00| 

Richard Marshal .... 

00 

00 

031 

Mrs. Ann Haigh de Aldermanshead 

00 

00 

031 


00 

07 

021 

Oxspring Cottage Rents 




Edward Bramhall .... 

0 

1 

9 

Ab: Gawthrop ..... 

0 

2 

6 

John Sylverwood .... 

0 

2 

0 

Rbt Wordsworth. .... 

0 

0 

9 

Wm Wordsworth .... 

0 

1 

3 

Jane Hall and y e Overseer . 

0 

2 

0 

Rbt Moor ...... 

0 

0 

9 


0 

11 

0 


Oxspring and Roughbirchworth etc. 

Chief Rents 

paid once a year at Martinmas 

Mr. Taylor and Mr. Senyor, Land . .040 

Mr. Green, Land in Oxspring, late Ellison’s 0 16 

Rbt Wild of Wickersley for Wrath-house 
late Wordsworth 


0 


0 


9 










246 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

£ 

John Wordsworth of Snowden-hill for 
land there ..... 0 

The Heirs of John Greaves of Hallfield for 
land in Hunshelf called Dunning House 0 
Mr. Wilson of Broomhead for lands in 


Thurlstone late Beever’s . . . 0 

Francis Battye for Land there . . 0 

Th° Haigh for Land there o 

Josias Saunderson for Land there . . 0 

W m Haigh for Senyor’s Land there . 0 

Richard Wordsworth of Wortley for Allen 
House and Land in Carlecoats . . 0 

John Rich for Reynold-Stones and Land 

there.0 

Ralph Marsden of Carlecoats for L d there 0 
W m Marsden for Middlecliffe and Illands 0 
John Pearson for Mr. Wentworth’s Land 
in Rough-Birchworth ... 0 


s. d. 
0 1 

1 4 

6 4 

6 4 

0 4| 

0 4J 
0 4} 

2 1 

1 0 
1 0 
0 8 

6 2 


1 12 4 | 

Joseph Broadhead for Roper’s land in Hun¬ 
shelf and Bradfield . Two Broad-headed Arrows. 
John Wordsworth of Softley for Land 
there and Roughbirthworth . A Thwittle. 
Thomas Firth of Shepley for Land in 

Carle-coates . . A pair of White Gloves 

Middop Cottage Rents 

Jonathan Hadfield . . . .056 

John Morton . . . . .008 

Joseph Platt . . . . ,019 





CAPTAIN BOSVILLE’S ESTATE 


247 


John Shaw ..... 

Nic: Hawley ..... 

Ann Wordsworth . . . . 

Wm Thompson ..... 
George Swallow 5 s 6 d , Chappell Intacks 3 d 
Mr. George Walker . . . . 


£ s . d. 
0 5 6 
0 0 6 
0 4 3 
0 5 6 
0 5 9 
0 2 6 


1 11 11 


Isaac Wordsworth of Brook-house. . A red rose 
Mr. Fenton of Underbank for Turbary in 

Langset . . . . . .A red rose 

Mr. Nicholas Stead for More Hall . . A red rose 

George Crawshaw of Bolsterstone for 

Peasebloom Close ... A pepper-corn 
The cottage and Chief Rents in Middop and Lang- 
side are collected by Jonathan Woodhouse. 


Pennyston Manour Coppyhold Rts 
Paid once a year , at St. Thomas s Day 1722 

£ s. d. 

Mr. Josyas Wordsworth of Water-Hall . 0 5 7 

Elyas Wordsworth of Gravills . .054 

Timothy Ellis of Hornthwaite and Johnl 

Battie of Thurlstone for Mr. Elkanah [ 0 6 0 

Rich’s land .... 

Emor Rich of Cawthran for land at y e 
Wood-end 


0 3 6 




248 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


John Saunderson of Walton for ye Syke 
Thomas Marsh of Roydfield-house for 
Mrs. Morton . 

• • 

John Wordsworth of Schole-hill for Mr. 
Eaton’s land ... 

Richard Marsden of y e Chappel for v e said 
Chapel . 

For ye Calf-Croft . 

For Mr. Rich for Hasle tofts. 

John Greaves of Penniston . 


£ s . d, 
0 0 7 

0 10 0 

0 2 6 

0 10 0 

0 10 
0 0 10 

0 16 


2 6 10 


Middop Chief Rents 


Paid once a year at Whitsuntide 1723 


Emor Rich sen of Yate hous 
More for Intacks 

• • . 

More for part of John Waimvright 
land 

Th os Hattersley de Middop 
More for B eight on land 


s 


Ralph Marsden de Middop 
John Greaves de Middop 
W m Greaves de Rowlee for Oakes . 
Stephen West de Lane 

George Saunderson of Middop for his 
watering place in y e Hagg 


00 10 06 
00 03 04 

00 03 06 
00 03 00 
00 00 06 
00 04 11 
00 04 06 
00 02 00 
00 10 00 

00 00 02 


02 02 05 







CAPTAIN BOSVILLE’S ESTATE 


249 


Langsett Cottage Rents 


Pd. once a year and due at Whitsuntide 1723 


Widdow Kay 
Jh° Platt . 
Widdow Smith . 
Jonathan Battye. 
Reginald Marsden 
John Fieldsend . 
Widdow Hinchliffe 


£ s. d. 

00 10 00 
00 01 00 
00 00 04 
00 00 04 
00 00 04 
00 00 04 
00 00 04 


00 12 08 


Langset Chief Rents 

Paid once a year , due Whitsuntide 1723 

Francis Mortyman for Mr. Watson Land 

de Boulton . . . . 00 00 02 

Ralph Marsden and Stephen West feoffees 
for y e Royd in Langset belonging to 
Middop Chappell . . . . 00 00 02 

00 00 04 


Note by Mr. Dransfield, who printed above in a 
collection of papers for the History of Peniston :— 

4 A lease from Captain Bosville to Mr. Abraham 
Wood, dated Jany. 31st, 1715, of 15 acres of land in 
Denby for £14—0—6 a year would show the rental 
to be 8/ per acre.’ 

The Land Tax evidently amounted to one shilling 
in the pound sterling. 










APPENDIX III 


‘LADY MACDONALD’S WEDDING CLOATHS 


1768.’ From a List at Thorpe 

WRITTEN AT 

Gunthwaite by her mother, Mrs. 

Bosville. 

17J y ds Silver ground Silver & flowers 
£3, 3/. 

£55= 2=6 

22 y ds blue Brocaded Lustring 12/ 

o 

II 

II 

CO 

rH 

21 y ds White with Sattin Spots 8/ 

o 

II 

<N 

rH 

II 

00 

18 j yds White and Gold Striped Gold 
Broc d 22/6 ..... 

20=10=0 

Making a Silver Suit of Cloaths . 

1= 1=0 

Stomacher & sleeve knots made with 
silver net & flowers.... 

o 

II 

CO 

rH 

II 

<M 

Silver trimming for Robings, Sleeves &c. 

4 = 9=2 

Making a Gold Sack .... 

1= 1=0 

Stomacher knots of gold fringe to trim it 

3= 3=0 

Green Bays to wrap them in 

0= 5=0 

Making a White Sack petticoat and 
Waistcoat ..... 

1 = 11=6 

3 y ds of Cloth 5 doz & J Trimming at 5/6 
P. doz. 

1 = 14=3 

Making a Flower’d Sack & petticoat 

1= 1=0 

5 doz: Trimm s at 9 s per Doz & 1 y d of 
persian ...... 

2= 7=0 

Cambrick 10 s per y d . 

1 = 5=7 

peice of Cambrick for pocket Hand s 

250 

3= 0=0 


LADY MACDONALD’S WEDDING CLOATHS 251 


1 peice of Diaper .... 

15 y ds & half of Corded Dimitty for 

£0=18=0 

petticoats ..... 

1 =11=0 

3 pair of Dimothy Pockets . 

0=15=0 

2 Quilted Bedgowns .... 

II 

00 

II 

o 

2 flannel petticoats .... 

0 = 13=0 

Ticken Stay ..... 

Long cane french Hoop & Bag for suit 

0 = 19=6 

of Cloaths ..... 

1 = 13=6 

a Silver Girdle 6/6 gold for Shoes 

o 

II 

M 

00 

II 

-5 

a pink Sarsnet Quilted Coat 

1=16=0 

Silver shape for Shoes & trimming 

CO 

II 

r- 1 

II 

O 

Sattin Shoes 3 pair & Making 

1= 7=6 

a pair of Stone Buckles 

II 

II 

o 

a pair of Silver Buckles 

0 = 17=6 


129=15 = 9 


[This is the end of Mrs. Bosville’s first 


large sheet. Here begins the second— 
the addition is hers.] 


Milliner’s Bill for Lace, y e . 

49=17=6 

a pair of Double Chainstitch Ruffles 

M 

II 

a 

II 

o 

a pair of Tribble Ditto 

2= 2=0 

2 pair of Jesuite Ruffles 

1 =16=6 

2 fans one 18 s , the other 10 s =6 d 

1= 8=6 

Black Silk Apron .... 

o 

II 

i— < 

a 

II 

o 

Silk & thread Stockings 
a White Sarsnet Cloak & Hatt full 

3= 9=0 

trimm d with Blonde 

3 = 16=0 

a Mignionette Handkerchief 

o 

II 

h—< 

II 

o 

a fine Mignionette Handkerchief . 

1 = 13=0 


tS|M 







252 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 

12 Holland Shifts 7 s per ell 
Sleeves .... 

2 ells of Lace for Little Ruffles 
6 Night Shifts . 

Making & Marking 18 shifts 
Combs & Brush 

A 7 ote .—There is another list at Thorpe with one or 
two interesting differences, such as : 4 Lilley’s Bill 
for Point & Mocklin Lace, £49=17=6J,’ and giving 
Mantua Maker’s bill, Sack Maker’s bill, and Gubbin’s 
bib separately, but with no details, and caUing the 
Tribble Ruffles 4 Tambour Tribble Ruffles.’ The cost 
of the whole is not added up to a total in the original, 
but the outfit comes altogether to £229, 16s. 2id. 

mt 


£7= 6=11 
9= 9=0 
0= 9=0 
4= 1=0 
1= 9=5 
0= 5=6 


APPENDIX IV 


NOTES ON THE HASSELL FAMILY 


The following notes on the Hassell family may be 
of interest, and make references to the different 
members spoken of in the text clearer. They are 
taken from MS. notes at Thorpe, signed Thos. Watson, 
and dated 1st May 1757. 


THOMAS HASSELL, = Agnes de la Motte, 


See Dugdale’s Visitation, at Malton, 

28 Aug. 1665. 


Governor of Gravelines. 


I 

3rd son, Thomas,; 
became seated at Conistrope and 
Easthorpe in N. Riding, Yorks, 
and was Lord of the Manor and 
possessed considerable estates at 

Hutton B. (name torn off— 

Bushell. ?) He was also of Trim- 
don, Holdyke and Elvot, in the 
Co. Durham. 


Juliana, only dau. of Launcelot Mans¬ 
field, in the Co. of Cumberland, Esq. 
Her brother was Surveyor General to 
Queen Elizabeth, and as he had no children 
by his wife (a dau. of the Lord Eure of 
Malton), she became his heir (of Hutton- 
upon-Derwent). 

A daughter, Ann, married John Harrison 
of Rudston and Wharram Priory, Gent. 


Samuel Hassell (eldest son), = Mary, dau. of Christopher Conyers of 


of Hutton-upon-Derwent, Esq., 
Barrister-at-Law. 


Norten and of Noblesworth in the Co. of 
Durham. 

A daughter, Mary, mar. Francis Constable 
of Troutsdale, and had a daughter, Mary, 
mar. to Allane Lamont of Burton Fleming. 


Samuel, 
d. unmarried. 


Ralph, 

an alderman of Doncaster, 
mar. but left no issue. 


Thomas (eldest son), = Elizabeth, dau. and co-heir of Barney Wood 


of Hutton-upon-Derwent, 
and a barrister of Gray’s Inn. 


a 


of Thorp in the Co. of York, Esq., Barrister- 
at-Law. 


253 











254 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


a 


Thomas. 

Ralph. 

Barney. 

Mansfield. 

D. without issue. 


I 

Elizabeth, m. Batson of Helmsley, and 
Cockfield Hall, Co. Durham, 
Esq., Gentleman of the Horse to 
George Villiers, second Duke of 
Buckingham, and likewise one 
of the Equerries to King Charles 
the Second, and had issue. 


i 

Samuel (eldest son), = (lst) Catherine, 

n+fnv\ T\_ i i •« 1 


of Hutton-upon - Derwent 
and Brandesburton, Esq. 
By his 2nd wife, Dorothy, 
widow of John Wyvil of 
Osgodsly, near Scarboro’, 
he had no issue. 


dau. and co-heir of 
Isaac Fairfax of Thornton, 
No. Riding. 


Samuel, 

m. Poirsida, dau. of 
Mr. Doloman of 
Lincolnshire. 

No issue. 


Catherine, 
m. (1st), 

Nathaniel Towray 
of East Kirby, 

Yorks. No issue. 
(2ndly), The Honble. 
Brigadier-General Luke 
Lillingston, and had 
1 dau., d. young. 
(3rdly), Sir Richard 
Osbaldistone of 
Hunmanby, Bart. 

(2 daughters). 

Her Will is at Thorpe. 


Elizabeth, 
m. Rev. Knowsley 
of Burton Fleming, 
Rector of Musgrave, 
Co. Westmorland. 

With issue. 


I 

Thomas Hassell* (eldest son),=ANN, the 2nd dau. of 

f nni* amvn« __• ■» r ..« _ 


of Thorpe and 
Hutton-upon- 
Derwent, Esq., 
d. 1773. 


Sir Matthew Wentworth 
of Bretton, Bart. 


Samuel, 
Bachelor of Law 
at St. John’s College, 
Cambridge, 
d. unmarried. 


I 

Ann, =Mr. Richard Moor, 
of Hull. With issue. 


nf T^Jo^^^ SSELL(el i ests0n) ’ =ANN ’+ one of the daughters and co- 
of Thorp and Hutton-upomDerwent, heirs of Thomas Elwick of Stainforth 

Esq., d. before his father, in the Co. of York, Esq. 

No issue. 


















NOTES ON THE HASSELL FAMILY 255 


*In 1773 this Thomas Hassell left Thorpe. Hutton, 
Brandesburton, etc., to Godfrey Bosville of New Hall, 
Gunthwaite, etc., who had married the niece of his 
wife, Diana Wentworth, daughter of Sir William 
Wentworth of Bretton, Bt., brother of Mrs. Ann 
Hassell. 


Note to Ann Hassell , nee Elwick 

fin a letter to Thomas Hassell from his son-in-law 
R. Moor, written at Hull and dated 24th April 1746, 
we read that poor Mrs. Hassell has become 6 quite 
distracted ’ ; that Apothecary and Doctor have both 
been employed in vain ; that she must be removed 
and her mother, Mrs. Elwick, informed. (Her 
husband was already evidently dead.) 

The letter continues, 4 1 congratulate you on the 
good news of the brave Duke of Cumberland’s success 
in the North, of which we this day received an 
express.’ He had enclosed a copy of this express, 
but it is not with the letter. How differently the 
news of Culloden affected hearers in the North ! 












INDEX 


Abbey, Missindry or Faversham, 

5 , 8 . 

Accounts (various), 34, 35, 42, 
68-72, 115, 116, 118. 
Advocates’ Library, Edinburgh, 
5. 

African Club, 190. 

Aire and Calder Canal, 98. 
Allot, John, of Bentley, 79. 

-Judith, 148. 

Almack’s, 159, 180, 182. 

Alsi, tenant of Darfield, 16. 
Amherst, Richard, 45. 

Amias, Percival, 209. 

Anne, Robert, 33, 46. 

Aquila, family, 27 n. 

Ardesley or Ardsley, 10, 12, 16, 
29, 30. 

Astell, Colonel, 128. 

-Mrs., 145. 

Auchterderran in Fife, 215. 
Avignon, 107- 
Aylesford fight, 74. 

Balcarres, Lord, 187. 

Barley, Thomas, 31. 
Barnborough, 8. 

Barnby, Charles, 40. 

Barrimore, Lady, 149. 

Battie, John, 206. 

Battle Abbey Roll, 5. 
Battlebourn, 83. 

Beauchief Abbey, 18. 

Beaumont, Sapcote, Viscount, 
83. 


Beaumont, Colonel John, 88-93. 
Beighton, 37, 39, 40. 

Besils-lee, 63. 

Best, Francis, 85. 

Biana, 100, 101, 103. 

Bilcliffe, James, 57. 

Birch, Major, 208. 

Blackburn, Mr., 100. 

Blackett, Sir Thomas, 106, 173, 
174. 

Blackett, Sir Walter, 137* 
Blackhall, 42. 

Blunt, George, 57. 

Bodiam Castle, 45. 

Bohun, Humphrey de, 14. 
Bolderston, 57. 

Bolle of Thorpe Hall, Lincoln¬ 
shire, 207. 

Bossall, 12. 

Bosville Arms, 28, 211, 212. 

-Memoirs, 2-5, 7, 16, 23, 34, 

38. 

-(I.), Sir Martin de, 1 et seq. 

-(II-), Sir Anthony de, 7 et 

seq. 

-(III.), Sir John de, 9 et seq. 

-(IV.), Sir Thomas de, 12. 

-- (V.), John, of Holme, 12. 

-(VI.), Sir John de, 13. 

-(VII.), Sir Peter de, 18. 

-(VIII.), Adam, Lord of 

Ardsley, 19, 21. 

-(IX.), Thomas, of Gunth- 

waite, 21. 

-(X.), John, of Ardsley, 31. 















258 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


BosviUe (XI.), John, of New 
Hall and Ardslev, 31. 

-(XII.), Richard, of Gunth- 

waite, 37. 

-(XIII.), John, of Gunth- 

waite, 38. 

-(XIV.), John 11 ., of Gunth- 

waite, 39. 

-(XV.), Godfrey, the first, 

50 ; his will, 54. 

-(XVI.), Francis, 56 ; his 

deed of settlement, 58. 

-(XVII.), Godfrey, the 

second, 62. 

-(XVIII.), William, 73. 

-(XIX.), Godfrey, the third, 

‘ Justice Bosville,’ 79. 

-(XX.), William, 97. 

-(XXI.), Godfrey, the fourth, 

99-179. 

-(XXII.), William, the last, 

186-195. 

-Alexander, of London, 4, 

207. 

-Alexander Wentworth Mac¬ 
donald, 201. 

-Alexander William Robert, 

108-200. 

-‘ Blazing,’ 218. 

-Charles, the Gipsy King, 

217-219. 

-Charles, of Biana, 100. 

-Clarembald de, 5. 

-Dionysia, 20. 

-Elias de, 7» 8, 9. 

-General and Mrs., 197- 

-Godfrey Wentworth Bay¬ 
ard, 201. 

-Henry, 40, 104. 

-Hugh, 99. 

-Sir James, of New Hall, 17. 

-Julia, Ladv Dudley, 123, 

124, 180-182, 193. 

-Sir Lennard, 49. 

-Margaret (Lennard), 49. 


Bosville, Margaretta, 60 n. 

-Mary, Mrs. Place, 99, 157. 

-‘ Miss,’ 210. 

-Ralph, 42, 43. 

-Sir Ralph, 41, 44, 46, 47, 49. 

-Richard, 5, 6. 

-Richard and Ralph, 214. 

-Robert, 42. 

-Robert, Constable of Pom- 

fret Castle, 17, 19, 206. 

-Robert, of Biana, 101, 222. 

-Roger, 21, 29. 

-Thomas Blackett, 112 et 

seq. 

-Thomas, of Cavil, 18. 

-Thomas, of Chevet, 30. 

-Thomas, of Tickhill, 39. 

-Sir W T illiam, 49. 

-W’illiam, of Bossall, High 

Sheriff, 12, 13. 

-William, of Eastburn, 85. 

-W’illiam, of New Hall, 30. 

-William de, 8. 

-WTlliam Parkin, 103, 208. 

-of Braithwell, 205, 206. 

-of Chevet, 209. 

-of Clifton, 204. 

-of Coningsborough, 203- 

204. 

-of Doncaster, 205-207- 

-of Warmsworth, 205-206. 

-W T illielmus de, 14. 

Boswell of Auchinleck, 6, 215. 

-of Balmuto, 6, 215. 

-Captain Hey Day, 75. 

-Dr. George, 212-217. 

-James, 109, 182-185, 215. 

-John, of Bellhouse Grange, 

40. 

-Levi, the Gipsy King, 218. 

Bowden, Thomas, 79. 

Bowzell W T ood, 42. 

Boyes, William, 84, 85. 

Boyne, battle of the, 92. 
Bradbourn, 42, 47, 49, 104. 




























































INDEX 


259 


Braithwell, 4, 20. 

Bretton, 15 
Brierley, 29. 

Briggs, Mr., 97. 

Brighthelmston, 145, 147- 
Broad Oak, 100. 

Broadhead, Jonas, 11. 

Brooke, Lady, 76. 

-Lord, 44, 63. 

Broxholme, Charles, 76. 
Buccleuch, Anna, Duchess of, 
89,90. 

Buchan, Countess of, 152. 
Buckingham, second Duke of, 
111 . 

Bunny, Edward, 79. 

Burdet of Denby, 56. 

Burdett, Sir Francis, 191,192. 
Burgess, E., 98. 

Burghley, Wm. Cecil, Lord, 
105. 

Burlington Priory, 13. 

Burton’s Monasticon Eboracensis , 
13. 

Bute, Lady, 108. 

Bykerthorp, 15. 

Byrton, 27. 

Cambridge, 154-158, 207. 
Campbell of Everlands, 42. 
Cannon Hall, 32. 

Cantuar, G., 53. 

Cardigan, Earl of, 100. 
Carlecoats, 10. 

Carlisle, Lord, 151. 

Carnarvon, Lady, 152, 153. 
Cavendish, 52. 

Cawthorne, 29, 50. 

-Chantry, 32. 

Chandos, Duchess of, 150. 
Chatsworth, 52. 

Chawforth, 5. 

Chaworth, Mr., 160. 

Cheam, 113, 114. 

Chester, Hugh Lupus, Earl of, 5. 


Chippendall, Mr., 194. 

Clapham, Thomas, of Beamsley, 
39. 

Clement, Sir Richard, 42. 
Clifford, Lady Anne, 46. 

-Mr., 191. 

Gobbett, William, 188, 192. 
Cockshutt, Mr., 146, 170. 
Colombell, Henry, 39. 

Cook, Thomas, 39. 

Cooke, Fr., 52. 

Copley, Alvery, of Batley, 58. 
-Christopher, of Wads¬ 
worth, 43. 

-Dorothy, 58 et seq. 

-Will, of Sprotborough, 56. 

Cotton Librarv, 8. 

Coventry, 65. 

Crawford, Major-General, 75. 
Cresacre, Isabel, 31. 

-Percival, of Barnborough, 

31. 

Cromwell, 74, 75. 

Croxden Abbey, 19. 

Culloden mentioned, 255. 

Dacre, Lady Margaret, 46, 48. 

-Lord, of the South, 43. 

Darcy, 27, 50. 

Darfield, 16, 29. 

-Alice de, 13, 15. 

-Clarice de, 13. 

-Hugh de, 13, 14, 16. 

-Swein de, 16. 

David, King of Scotland, 6. 
Dawnay, Thomas, 50. 

Denby, 60, 75, 76, 202. 

Denny, 39. 

Dichton, Thomas de, 15. 
Dimsdale, Baron, 191. 

Donald, the Clan, 200. 
Donoughmore, Lord, 191. 
Dorril, Mr., 126. 

Dorset, Marquis of, 29. 
Douglas’s Baronage , 6. 
















260 THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


Drake’s Antiquities of York, 12. 
Driffield trout stream, 83. 
Dronsfield, William, Knight, 31. 
Dugdale’s Monasticon, 7, 3. 
Durr, River, 16. 

Eaden, Mr., 151. 

Eastburn Warren, 83, 84. 
Eccleshall, 101. 

Enfield, 74. 

Essex, Earl of, 74. 

Este, Mr., 191. 

Eynsford, 42, 43. 

Eyre, Captain, 65. 


Grey, Amabel de, 222. 
Grimston, Silvester, 9. 

-Thomas, Knight, 9. 

-Mr., 220, 221. 

Gunn, 22. 

-Mary, of Caithness, 23. 

Gunthwai’te, 75, 76, 80, 109. 

-Alicia de, 22 et seq. 

-Barn, 51. 

-Hall, 24, 25, 85, 87. 

- John and Christiana de 

21 . 

-Lands, 29. 

-Pedigree, 22. 


Fairfax, Sir Thomas, 75. 

Fisher, Benedicta, 79. 

FitzSwein, Adam, 50. 
Fitzwilliam, Sir John of Sprot- 
borough, 31. 

Flemming, William le, 16. 
Flodden, 215. 

Folyot, Agnes, 12. 

-John, Lord, 12. 

Friend, Astronomer Royal, 191. 
Furnivall, Beatrix de, 18, 19. 

-Joan, 18. 

-Lady, 19. 

-Lord, 18. 

Gill, Miss, 128, 135. 

Gilpin, Mr., 114. 

Glenham, Edward, 46. 
Glenorchy, Lord, 222, 223. 
Glover’s Pedigree, 4, 8, 21. 
Greame, Mrs., of Sewerbv, 121, 
159. 

Greville, Fulke, of Thorpe Lati¬ 
mer, 43, 62. 

-Sir Edward, 54. 

-Elizabeth, 54. 

-Margaret, 54. 

Grey, John, Lord, 62. 

-Sir John, of Groby, 43. 

-Duke of Kent, 22i, 222. 


Hallamshire , History of, 2, 13. 
Hardwick, Jane, 51. 

Harold, King, 2, 5. 

Hartley, Richard, 79. 

Hassell, Thomas, 100. 

-Mrs. (Mansfield), 110. 

Hastings, battle of, 2, 5, 9. 

-Sir Francis, 50. 

Hawke, Major, 187- 
Hawley of Penistone, 26. 
Helmsley Castle, 111-. 

Henry, Prince of Scotland, 7. 

- ii., King of England, 8, 

10 . 

Hesilrigge, Sir Arthur, 44, 62. 
Hewet, Sir William, 40. 
Hodgson, Mr., 100. 

, Hoffman, Mrs., 148. 

Home, Lady, 151. 

: Hopton, Sir Ralph, 74. 

Hotham, Bridget, 83. 

-Sir Charles, 84. 

- Sir John, Bart., of Scor- 

brough, 83. 

-Lord, 83. 

Hounds, Bosville, 105. 

Howley Hall, 100. 

Hudson, John, 79. 

Hull, 29. 

Hunshelf, 10, 11, 57. 





























INDEX 


261 


Hunter, Rev. Joseph, 2, 3, 7, 8, 
13-16,19,21,42, 48, 54,96,98, 
100, 108, 206, 217. 

Hutchison, Lord, 191. 

Hutton Ambo, 110. 

-Bardolph, 110. 

Ingbirch worth, 81. 

Ireland, 92. 

Jackson, Rev. Edward, Vicar of 
Penistone, 42. 

-Mr., 151. 

James ii., 89, 92. 

-v. and vi. of Scotland, 215. 

Johnson, Dr., 109. 

Jordan of Eastburn family, 83. 

‘ Julius Caesar,’ 53. 

Kelkparva, 13. 

Keresford, 29. 

Kingswood, 74. 

Knole estate, 42. 

-Leicester Gallery, 46. 

Lacey, John, 56. 

Laci, 27- 

Lammas Assizes, 1705, 82. 
Langsett, 57. 

Langton, 31, 32. 

Lassels, George, 52. 

Lee, Cornet, 159. 

Leeds, Duke of, 77. 

Leigh, 145. 

Lennard, Mary, 45, 46. 

-Sampson, of Knole, 46. 

Levett, Thomas, 45. 

Lewkenor, Sir Roger, 45. 
Lillebonne Castle, 2. 

Lillingston, General Luke, 151. 
Lumley, Lord, 88. 

Macdonald, third Lord, 76, 103. 

-Elizabeth Diana, Lady,119- 

121 . 


Macdonald of the Isles, family, 

22 . 

-Sir Alexander, 23,106. 

Macgregor, Janet, 216. 

Magna Charta, 18. 

Mansfield, Will of John, 111. 
Margaret, Queen of Scotland, 6. 
Marsden, William, 81. 

Marsham, Sir Robert, 60 n. 
Marston Moor, 75. 

Mary Queen of Scots, 215. 
Marylebone, 128. 

Maud, Empress, 10. 
Maundeville, Geffery, Comes de, 
14. 

Micklethwaite, Benjamin, 36. 
Middleton, Digby, ninth Lord, 
201 . 

-Henry, tomb of Canon, 83. 

-Henry, eighth Lord, 201. 

-Lieut.-General, 75. 

Midhope, 61, 81. 

-Chapel, 105, 106. 

Moncreiffe, Elizabeth, 215. 
Modus, the, 10. 

Monmouth, Duke of, 89, 90. 
Montacute, William de, 18. 
Mortimer, Edmund, Lord, 19. 

-Maud, 19. 

Mosley, 87. 

Mounteagle, Lord, 50. 
Mounteney, Matilda (Bosville), 
9. 

-Thomas, 9. 

Nabob, the, 128. 

Naismith, Dr., 216. 

Nancy, 126. 

Nash, Hugh de la, Knight, 12. 
Needwood, 74. 

Nevill, Jane, 37. 

-Sir John, of Chevet, 30. 

-Sir Robert, 50. 

-Miss, 159. 

New Hall, 10, 29, 30, 81. 



















262 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


Nissa or Nice, 107, 108. 
Normandy, Duke William of, 2. 
Normandy , History of, 5. 

Nostell Abbey, 7, 8, 9. 

Oak, the Gunthwaite, 26. 

Ojley, Francis, Vicar of Peni- 
stone, 82. 

Osborne, Sir Edward of Kive- 
ton, 76, 77. 

Oxford, Lord, 191. 

Oxmuir, 6. 

Oxspring, 10,11, 57, 61, 80, 202. 

Payne, Tom, 188. 

Pelham, Herbert, of Fewer, 73. 
Penistone, 76, 80, 82, 83, 96,106 

-School, 73. 

-rental, 81. 

Pershall, Arabella, 220-223. 

-Sir Thomas, Bart., of Sug- 

nail, 221. 

Petley, Thomas, of Halstead, 45 
Phillips, Charles, 45. 

Pigot, Henry, 39. 

Pocklington, 77. 

Poitiers, battle of, 28. 

Pole, de la, William, 28. 

Poltney, Mr., 151. 

Pontefract, Honour of, 29. 
Popeley, John, 37. 

Portman, Sir William, 88. 

Pre, de la, the house of, 14. 
Proctor, —, 37- 

Queen Charlotte’s snuffbox, 152. 

Radcliff, Helen (Bosville), 7, 9. 

-Thomas, 7- 

Radcliffe of Ordsal, 209. 
Ravenfield, 208, 209. 

Ravensrode, 29. 

Redman, Richard, of Harwood, 
39. 

Rentall, 1663, 80, 81. 


Rentall, 1722, 98. 

Reynolds, Sir Joshua, 119. 
Richardson, Captain, 97. 
Richmond in Surrey, 79. 

Ridley, Anne, 49. 

:-Sir Thomas, 49. 

Robinson, Sir Thomas, 152, 153. 
Rockley of Rockley, 33. 
Rodmore, 98. 

Roebuck, Thomas, 105. 

Rolston, Lionel, 58, 59, 62. 
Romney, Earl of, 60 n. 
Roscarrocke, Nicholas, 205. 
Rosebery, third Earl of, 180-182. 
Row, Mrs., 151. 

Rowley, —, 37. 

Ryder, D., 87. 

Rykenildthorpe, Matilda of, 21. 

Saddler’s Wells, 128. 

St. Samson, 1. 

i # ' 

Saint-Valery-en-Caux, 1. 
Sandilands, Isobel, 216. 

Savile of New Hall, 56. 

Scotrode, 15. 

Seaton-Ross, 76. 

Sedascue, George, 73, 80. 
Settrington, near Malton, 201. 
Sevenoaks, 44, 45, 49. 

Shannon’s Marines, Lord, 97. 
Sheffield Castle, 53. 

-John, 39. 

Shepherd’s Castle, 100. 

; Sherwood, 74. 

Shields, kite and heater shaped, 
15. 

Shirt, John, 65, 78, 106. 

-Nathaniel, 106. 

Shrewsbury, Elizabeth, Countess 
of, 52. 

-Mary, Countess of, 53. 

Silver in Gunthwaite, 177, 178. 
Sinclair, Sir John, first Bart, of 
Ulbster, 190,191. 

I --Rev. John, 190 et seq. 












INDEX 


263 


Sinclair, Lady Margaret, 215. 
Skinner, Anthony, 41. 

Sleat, Chiefship of, 200. 
Sledmere, 123. 

Snaith, 50. 

South Yorkshire, History of, 3, 7, 
13, 29. 

Southampton, Henry, Lord, 53. 
Spencer, John, 66,159,160,166. 
Spencer-Stanhope family, 32. 

-Walter, 121, 159. 

Sprotborough, 43, 44. 

Stanhope, Colonel, 97. 

Stanley, Sir Thomas, 50. 
Stapleton, Sir Philip, 74. 
Stephen, King of England, 8, 
10 . 

Stephens, Alexander, 66,189. 
Stephenson, Mr., 126. 

Stirling, Mrs., quoted, 107, 121. 
Stocks, Edmund, 11. 

Suffolk, Duke of, 62. 

Swift, John, 37- 
-Mr., 53. 

Talun, Jane, 13. 

-John of Bossall, 12, 13. 

Tavistock, Marquis of, 165, 166. 
Tax, Plate, 119. 

-Window, 119. 

Thoresby’s Diary, 98. 

Thorpe Hall mentioned, 2, and 
throughout. 

-described, 110, 122-124. 

Thorpe-Salvine, 77. 

Thurlstone, 10, 67, 100. 

Tooke, Memoirs of John Horne, 
66, 188, 189, 191, 192. 

Turin, 107. 

Turtle for dinner, 172, 173. 
Twistleton, Colonel, 128, 135. 

Ufford, Co. Northampton, 207- 
Ulverstone Abbey, 103, 207- 
Unshriven Bridge, 57- 


Van Somer of Antwerp, 46. 
Vauxhall, 128. 

Vesci, Emma de, 20. 

-John, of Coningsborough, 

20 . 

Wages, 117. 

Walker, Mrs. (Eliz. Wentworth), 
150. 

Waller, Sir William, 74. 

Ward, Mr., 150. 

Wardon Abbey, 14. 

Warren, Ada de, 7- 
-William de (i. of Scot¬ 
land), 7, 8. 

Waters, Mr., 151. 

Watson, 3. 

-William, of Cockfieid, 111. 

W aynwright of Wytwell Hall, 57- 
Webster, Mr., 63, 65, 78. 
Weever, 44. 

Wentworth, Annabella, 126 et 
seq. 

-Diana (Bosville), 106. 

-Elizabeth’s Letters, 127 et 

seq. 

-Lady (Henrietta), 89. 

-John, 31. 

-Sir Thomas, of Bretton, 65. 

-Sir William, of Bretton,106. 

Wheatear, the, 147. 

Wheatley, John, of Woolley, 56. 

-of Royston, 99. 

-of Woolley, 99. 

Whitehall, 52. 

Whitfield, Francis, 52. 

Wight, William, 84. 

Wilkes, John, 187. 

William hi., 92, 94. 

William the Conqueror, 59. 
William Rufus, 5. 

Williamson, 148. 

-Mary, 78. 

-Roger, 78. 

Willoughby, Hon. H. C., 201. 






















264 


THE FORTUNES OF A FAMILY 


Willy, Richard, 11. 

Wilson, John, of Broomhead, 4, 
14, 35, 51, 177. 

-Colonel, 75. 

Winchester, Bishop of, 79. 
Windham, Mr., 128. 

Womb well, 29. 

Wood Hall, John of the, 31. 
Wordsworth, Thomas, 57. 
Worsborough, 29. 


‘ Worsoppe ’ Manor, 53. 
Wortley, Sir Francis, of Wortley, 
65. 

-Montague, Lady Mary, 

107. 

-S., 94, 95. 

Wortleys, owners of New Hall, 
81. 

Wroxall, 62. 

Wygfall, Richard, 33. 





.